Queens

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    This 2,025-square-foot condo in prime Long Island City boasts three bedrooms, three bathrooms and also three balconies. There are floor-to-ceiling windows and exposures to the north, south and west.

    The open kitchen has Fisher & Paykel stainless steel appliances, a dishwasher, garbage disposal and large pantry. There’s also a Bosch washer and dryer. The en-suite bathroom off the master bedroom has two sinks and a rain shower.

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    This three-bedroom, one-and-a-half-bathroom rental won’t win any design awards — the kitchen cabinets need updating, there’s a pink bathroom and the floors are a little loud, to say the least. But the size, location and price of $2,900 per month make up for it.

    Located at 30-89 48th Street, the top-floor unit has a large eat-in kitchen and formal dining room, large living room, and supposedly has two balconies, though only one is pictured. As mentioned, the half-bathroom is filled with pink tiles, but the full bath is perfectly normal looking.

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    This week on Brownstoner Queens, columnist Kevin Walsh takes us on a historic tour of Ridgewood’s stretch of Myrtle Avenue, one of the lengthiest streets in both Brooklyn and Queens. The avenue’s origins date back to 1835 on a stretch of road that’s now mostly Bedford Avenue.

    Learn about how this thoroughfare — along with some of its current landmarks — has changed through the years, over on Brownstoner Queens.

    Photo by Kevin Walsh

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    Ridgewood Theatre, 55-27 Myrtle Avenue between St. Nicholas and Putnam avenues

    Myrtle Avenue, one of the lengthiest streets in both Brooklyn and Queens, runs for nearly 15 miles from Jay Street MetroTech complex in the heart of downtown Brooklyn, east to Jamaica Avenue at the former Triangle Hofbrau.

    It was first laid out in 1835 from Fulton Street to as far as Cripplebush Road, an ancient Kings County track now largely replaced by Bedford Avenue. It was extended in 1839 to Brooklyn’s Broadway, and again in 1854 as the tolled Jamaica Plank Road out to Jamaica. (Most of NYC’s toll roads of this type were made “free” around 1890-1900.)

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    This Tudor house in Murray Hill was built in 1935 and is listed as a first- or second-floor rental or a whole-house rental. The house has a back deck, a basement with a washer and dryer, a garage, and a plentiful garden area in the front. There are three bedrooms and two bathrooms throughout the whole house.

    The kitchen is beautiful with dark wood cabinets and marble countertops. There is lots of counter space and an island for even more. The kitchen also comes with a dishwasher. The living room is large and all of the bedrooms seem to be a good size. The first-floor and second-floor monthly rental is $2,000, and the whole-house monthly rental is $2,600.

    The Q16 bus is a quick walk down the street, and the Q28, Q31 and Q76 buses are a nine-minute walk down 32nd Avenue. The Broadway LIRR station is also about a 16-minute walk away from the house. Browne Park is seven blocks over from the building, and there is a supermarket about two blocks away. The area is mostly residential, but two blocks away along Francis Lewis Boulevard there are small shops and dining options. You’ll find even more dining options closer to the Broadway LIRR station along Northern Boulevard. Click through for more photos.

    29-41 166th Street S [Century Homes Realty Group LLC] GMAP

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    Today’s listing is a two-family home on the border of College Point and Whitestone. The upstairs unit has three bedrooms and two bathrooms, while the lower apartment has one bedroom and one bathroom.

    Located at 14-43 138th Street, the house boasts a fully solar powered heating and electrical system. It’s a fantastic location, walking distance from Target, BJ’s Wholesale and other shopping, and Spa Castle, and a few blocks from Powell’s Cove Park and GU Harvey Playground. There are buses accessible from 14th and 20th avenues.

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    This two-story Queens Village house has three bedrooms and two-and-a-half baths. It has a sizable eat-in kitchen and also a separate dining room, and there are nice-looking hardwood floors throughout the house.

    One of the home’s best highlights is the enclosed sun room with bay window, accessed through French doors. The three bedrooms are reasonably sized, and in terms of common areas there’s a finished basement, living room and a large backyard with patio.

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    The present-day intersection of Main Street and Northern Boulevard has served as the heart of Flushing since the mid 1600s. It’s changed significantly since then, and columnist Kevin Walsh takes us on a tour through Main Street’s history, including a grand, now-shuttered theater, a church that’s been a neighborhood mainstay since the early 1700s and more.

    Read all about it on Brownstoner Queens.

    Photo by Kevin Walsh

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    RKO Keith’s, Northern Boulevard and Main Street

    Since the mid 1600s, the heart of Flushing (named by early Dutch cartographers Vlissingen, later bowdlerized to Flushing by the settling Brits) has been the T-shaped intersection of the present Main Street and Northern Boulevard. In its early years Flushing was a hotbed of religious conflict, as the New Netherland colony Director-General Peter Stuyvesant was intolerant of any other religion but the Dutch Reformed Church; the colonists’ burgeoning religious independence led to the creation of the Flushing Remonstrance, a display concerning which can be found at Flushing Library; and the travails of John Bowne, whose early-1660s home still stands on Bowne Street.