Queens

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Bayside, in northeast Queens, was first settled by the British around Alley Creek, the East River inlet now leading to Alley Pond Park, in the early 1700s. It was first named Bay Side in 1798 and by the time the one-word spelling appeared in the 1850s, it was a small but potent community, giving rise to governmental leaders and statesmen.

The neighborhood has always retained a small-town atmosphere centered around Bell Boulevard. The street is named for Abraham Bell, an Irish Quaker who was a partner in a shipping firm and owned a vast farm in the area, and has nothing at all to do with Alexander Graham Bell, the inventor who obtained the first patent for the telephone. The city, however, has added to the confusion by naming P.S. 205, as well as its playground at 75th Avenue and 217th Street (a couple of blocks from the boulevard), Bell Park and later, Telephone Park, in honor of the inventor.

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Chilly weather might be looming over New York, but it’s never too soon to start dreaming of another three months of sun — especially if you’ve got this beachfront condo ready to go for next summer.

Listed for $325,000, this condo at 91-16 Shorefront Parkway is steps from the Rockaway Beach boardwalk. It has one bedroom, one bathroom and a large private terrace; the brand-new kitchen, open to the living/dining room, is sleek with stainless steel appliances, caesarstone countertops and Poggenpohl cabinets.

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With the recent completion of the U.S. Open tennis tournament at Arthur Ashe Stadium and the now-expected ascension of the New York Mets into the National League baseball playoffs for the first time since 2006, Flushing Meadows-Corona Park finds itself at the center of New York City’s professional sports life as summer 2015 draws to a close.

Queens columnist Kevin Walsh guides us through the park’s sports offerings, as well as its art and history.

Read all about it on Brownstoner Queens.

[Photo: Kevin Walsh]

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View of Citifield from the Passerelle Boardwalk over Corona Yard

With the recent completion of the United States Open tennis tournament at Arthur Ashe Stadium and the now-expected ascension of the New York Mets into the National League baseball playoffs for the first time since 2006, Flushing Meadows-Corona Park finds itself at the center of New York City’s professional sports life as summer 2015 draws to a close. Let’s take a look at some of these venues as well as the park itself.

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    This 2,025-square-foot condo in prime Long Island City boasts three bedrooms, three bathrooms and also three balconies. There are floor-to-ceiling windows and exposures to the north, south and west.

    The open kitchen has Fisher & Paykel stainless steel appliances, a dishwasher, garbage disposal and large pantry. There’s also a Bosch washer and dryer. The en-suite bathroom off the master bedroom has two sinks and a rain shower.

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    This three-bedroom, one-and-a-half-bathroom rental won’t win any design awards — the kitchen cabinets need updating, there’s a pink bathroom and the floors are a little loud, to say the least. But the size, location and price of $2,900 per month make up for it.

    Located at 30-89 48th Street, the top-floor unit has a large eat-in kitchen and formal dining room, large living room, and supposedly has two balconies, though only one is pictured. As mentioned, the half-bathroom is filled with pink tiles, but the full bath is perfectly normal looking.

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    This week on Brownstoner Queens, columnist Kevin Walsh takes us on a historic tour of Ridgewood’s stretch of Myrtle Avenue, one of the lengthiest streets in both Brooklyn and Queens. The avenue’s origins date back to 1835 on a stretch of road that’s now mostly Bedford Avenue.

    Learn about how this thoroughfare — along with some of its current landmarks — has changed through the years, over on Brownstoner Queens.

    Photo by Kevin Walsh

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    Ridgewood Theatre, 55-27 Myrtle Avenue between St. Nicholas and Putnam avenues

    Myrtle Avenue, one of the lengthiest streets in both Brooklyn and Queens, runs for nearly 15 miles from Jay Street MetroTech complex in the heart of downtown Brooklyn, east to Jamaica Avenue at the former Triangle Hofbrau.

    It was first laid out in 1835 from Fulton Street to as far as Cripplebush Road, an ancient Kings County track now largely replaced by Bedford Avenue. It was extended in 1839 to Brooklyn’s Broadway, and again in 1854 as the tolled Jamaica Plank Road out to Jamaica. (Most of NYC’s toll roads of this type were made “free” around 1890-1900.)

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