r train

The R train will finally run between Brooklyn and Manhattan on Monday morning, after 13 months of repairs following Hurricane Sandy, the Post and the Daily News report. The MTA shut down service in the Montague tube last August so workers could replace tracks, signals and communications equipment that was devastated by the storm. Since then, R trains have run only between Bay Ridge and Court Street in Brooklyn, and between Whitehall Street in the Financial District and Forest Hills-71st Avenue in Queens.

Photo by Alex

4th avenue 9th street

The MTA announced last week that the lengthy renovation of the 4th Avenue – 9th Street subway station will continue with the closure of the northbound R train stairway on the northeast corner for three months, beginning September 1. It’s going to replace the staircase. After that work finishes, the MTA will close the southbound R train entrance on the northwest corner, in order to replace that staircase.

Councilmember Brad Lander released a statement about it today, chastising the MTA for blowing all of its deadlines and not communicating with the community about construction plans.“While I am glad that the MTA is making necessary investments in our public infrastructure, I am disappointed that the delays plaguing the Culver Viaduct Rehabilitation will now cause more commuters to regularly traverse a construction zone,” Lander said in the press release.

Photo by Gryffindor via Wikimedia Commons

east river ferry

The East River Ferry returned to India Street Pier on Saturday, just as the G train shut down between Nassau Avenue and Court Square until September 2. Greenpointers reported that the ferry will run on its summer schedule, with departures every 20 to 30 minutes and stops at Pier 11 on Wall Street, Dumbo, South Williamsburg, North Williamsburg, Long Island City and East 34th Street. But temporary shuttle buses will run between India Street and the North 6th Street pier until Wednesday. And if the ferry isn’t running, Uber is offering one free ride between the Nassau Avenue and Court Square G stops until August 31.

Photo via East River Ferry

new york water taxi

Getting to Red Hook this summer will be a little easier with the relaunch of the water taxi, which will make its first trip tomorrow between the Financial District and Van Brunt Street. The free ferry runs from Pier 11, which is at Gouverneur Lane and South Street, to the Fairway Market Ferry Dock at 480 Van Brunt Street in Red Hook. The first ferry leaves tomorrow at 9:30 am from Pier 11. It will run in a continuous loop every weekend through Labor Day.

Photo by Jason Kuffer

milk bar vanderbilt avenue

Community Board 8′s Transportation Committee voted last night to install four new bike corrals in front of bars and restaurants on Vanderbilt and Washington avenues in Prospect Heights. The corrals will bring bike parking to three bars on Vanderbilt: Bar Chuko on the corner of Pacific Street, Milk Bar at Prospect Place (pictured) and Branded at Bergen Street.

Bar Corvo is also slated for a bike corral on the corner of Washington Avenue and Lincoln Place. The whole board still has to vote before it’s a done deal, but approval is likely.

Photo via Jane Kim Design

On Tuesday night, Community Board 2′s transportation committee unanimously approved the DOT’s plan to improve safety for pedestrians and cyclists on Park Avenue between Navy and Steuben streets. Park has long been one of the borough’s most dangerous streets. It’s situated directly underneath the BQE and includes several parking areas in the middle of the road. Drivers often pull out of these parking areas into fast-moving traffic where nearly three quarters of drivers are speeding. The mile-long corridor has 13.6 fatalities or series injuries per mile, and a third of all crashes happen at a right angle, usually involving a driver running a red light, according to DOT data.

The DOT adapted much of its plan from one released by the Myrtle Avenue Revitalization Project and Architecture for Humanity in 2012. Safety improvements include painting parking lanes and a buffer on the eastbound side of the street, another parking lane on the westbound side, and painting a buffer on the westbound side to narrow it down to two lanes (from three) at Williamsburg Place. Pedestrians will also have more time to cross the street and gain some protection from barriers installed on one side of the parking areas. The city hopes to implement the new safety measures in September. You can see the full presentation here.

Image via DOT

Street safety advocates will have a chance to make their voices heard at two upcoming Vision Zero workshops in Brooklyn Heights and Flatbush. Anyone can attend and suggest street safety improvements, bike lanes, or slow zones in neighborhoods throughout Brooklyn. NYPD and DOT staff will split attendees into small discussion groups and use maps to help pinpoint the borough’s most problematic streets.

The first meeting is happening from 6:30 to 8:30 pm tonight at Plymouth Church, located at 75 Hicks Street in Brooklyn Heights. And next Tuesday, April 29, there will be a second workshop from 6:30 to 8:30 pm on the second floor of the Brooklyn College Student Center at Campus Road and East 27th Street. There’s more info about the workshops on the Vision Zero page.

 

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A story in The New York Times suggests Mayor de Blasio can do an end run around Albany and forge a public transportation route to meet new needs with a modern streetcar line along the waterfront from Brooklyn to Queens. The line would make it easier for residents to get around Brooklyn; tie together transit starved areas such as Red Hook, Greenpoint and the Navy Yard; connect to ferry, bus and subway routes; and link Brooklyn to Queens.

The author estimates it would cost somewhere around $600,000,000 or so. Now that Brooklyn is less Manhattan-centric, do you think this is an idea whose time has come, or should we just improve existing bus and subway service?

Imagining a Streetcar Line Along the Brooklyn Waterfront [NY Times]

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A reader sent us the photo above with the headline “are they back?” last night. As you may recall, some of the vintage streetcars were carted off in February.

Coincidentally or not, their collector, Bob Diamond, a historic railways buff, has just finished a new report about setting up a streetcar system that would run from Red Hook to downtown Brooklyn and re-opening the unused 169-year-old subway tunnel under Atlantic Avenue that has been closed since 2010, DNAinfo reported. He has also set up a Kickstarter fund to ask for $5,000 to print up copies of the study to send to elected officials.

Do you think a streetcar from Red Hook to downtown sounds like a good plan?

Greenpoint residents called for more G train and bus service to accommodate the area’s growing population at a community forum last night about the forthcoming five-week summer suspension of the train line, the Brooklyn Eagle reported.

Longtime residents want the standard eight or 10 cars on every train instead of only four, and said the train is as crowded on weekend nights as at rush hour, perhaps because of the area’s growing young population. Others pointed out the new B-32 bus, which runs a similar route to the G train, should be extended on each end so it connects to subways in Manhattan and Queens.

The crowd booed mention of a study that said the G train is not overcrowded, and Assemblyman Joe Lentol promised to conduct his own survey. “Greenpoint is no longer the little hamlet of the past, but part of the big metropolis,” he said. 

G-Train Complaints Erupt at Greenpoint Forum [Daily Eagle]
Photo by All Nite Images

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The MTA is suspending G train service between Nassau Avenue and Court Square for over a month this summer, and Greenpoint’s elected officials are holding a town hall Thursday to discuss the shutdown. The G train won’t run in Greenpoint from July 26 to September 1 because of Sandy-related repairs, according to Senator Daniel Squadron’s office. There will be a shuttle service between the affected stops.

State Senator Daniel Squadron is hosting the meeting, which takes place April 3 at 6 pm in the Polish and Slavic Center at 176 Java Street. Borough President Eric Adams, State Senator Dilan, Assembly Member Lentol and Council Member Stephen Levin are expected to attend.

Photo by jim.henderson for Wikipedia

Atlantic-Avenue-Brooklyn-Insiders-Guide-Restaurants-Bars-Shopping-Architecture-NYC_67

Last night at Medgar Evers College, Transportation Commissioner Polly Trottenberg announced that Atlantic Avenue is going to get safety improvements for pedestrians and cyclists as part of Mayor de Blasio’s Vision Zero campaign. The DOT will install protected bike lanes, dedicated bus lanes, and pedestrian safety measures, according to a press release.

Although no timeline was announced for the improvements, Trottenberg said Atlantic would be among the first 50 priority corridors for safety improvements. Atlantic Avenue has long been one of Brooklyn’s busiest and most dangerous streets, and over 1,400 cyclists and pedestrians were injured by drivers on the road between 2002 and 2013.