08/20/12 10:30am


Friends had told us we could furnish our entire house for about the price of a new Apple computer at the Madison-Bouckville antique show in Bouckville, N.Y., about a five hour drive from Brooklyn. So we rented a cargo van in Crown Heights and set off on the road. Similar to Brimfield, the show consists of tents in fields. Fortunately, the weather was beautiful. The pay field ($5) was the best with oodles of fine antiques at great prices. The other fields were a little bit more like a flea market, but there were some great finds there too.  If you are looking for Empire furniture — a big period in New York state history — you will find it here. (more…)

05/25/12 11:45am


Shopping blog Racked came out with its list of the 38 Top Independent Boutiques in New York City this week and Brooklyn appears to have held its own. Thirteen Brooklyn spots made the cut, with the lion’s share of those being in Greenpoint and Williamsburg. In addition to North Brooklyn staples like Bird and In God We Trust, Fort Greene stalwart Stuart & Wright were highlighted as well as a handful of places on Smith Street like Epaulet and Dear Fieldbinder.

03/31/11 9:30am

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Today The Daily News reports that a flea market is planned for Coney Island this year that’s claiming it will be New York’s biggest such market. While details about the venture are scant—its organizers wouldn’t answer a reporter’s questions, so it’s unclear, for example, where in Coney it would be set up—the event is being organized by management from the former Aqueduct Flea Market in South Ozone Park, which has been displaced from the Aqueduct’s parking lot. The flea market is going by the name “BK Festival,” and a teaser website for it says it will have a “festival style” and have a “free shuttle bus” for tourists. In other Coney Island news, The Eagle notes that the Wonder Wheel will open in mid-April.
Aqueduct Flea Vendors Eying Move to Coney Island [NY Daily News]
BK Festival [Official Site]

02/24/11 4:00pm

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The map above is part of a Country Living feature called “Brooklyn’s Small-Town Charms.” Here’s part of the piece’s intro: “Today, Brooklyn still feels more heartland than Big Apple, with ribbon-worthy pie cafés hanging out shingles next to soda shops and general stores. To make navigating this supersized Mayberry manageable, we planned day trips around three of our favorite areas — Greenpoint and Williamsburg; Atlantic Avenue, Carroll Gardens, and Red Hook; and Prospect Park and Park Slope (highlighted on map) — then homed in on the best spots to shop, eat, and explore.” Brooklyn as a “supersized Mayberry”? OK.
Brooklyn’s Small-Town Charms [Country Living]

09/20/10 10:01am

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Fresh off the news that the Greene Hill Food Co-Op signed its lease at 18-24 Putnam Avenue, Fortune takes a look at “the rise of the grocery co-op,” focusing specifically on the Park Slope location. The PSFC is the largest consumer-owned co-op by sales in the United States, raking in $39.4 million dollars (or $6,500 per square foot) last year. The reason for success and the big savings? Inventory based on customer demand, requiring all members to work at the store and only allowing members to shop, and a limited selection of items within a small store footprint. And while the article says competing grocery stores have brushed off the PSFC as a one-time success story, it also notes that 200 co-ops are currently in start-up mode. That’s the largest number since the 70s!
The Rise of the Grocery Store Co-Op [Fortune]
Photo by nancyscola

01/08/10 2:00pm

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Yona Lee, the latest vintage shop on 5th Avenue, is open for business. The owner of the store used to have an outpost in the East Village that she sold off a few years ago. According to a salesperson, the store primarily specializes in threads from the ’70s, ’80s and ’90s ’60s, ’70s, and ’80s, with prices starting at around $25 for shirts. It’s between Sackett and Degraw.
5th Ave Transforming Into Vintage Row [Brownstoner] GMAP

12/31/09 12:00pm

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As if on cue, today’s snow is a perfect illustration for the use of the Snow Wovel. This ergonomic snow removal device is designed to eliminate stress of the back, and make snow removal easy and dare I say fun! Having one of these babies in Brooklyn will make you either the envy, or the laughingstock of your block, but have we ever cared what other people think? It is easy to assemble, folds up small for off-season storage, and the $120 price is cheaper than a doctor’s visit for throwing your back out. You could probably make the money back renting it to the neighbors, but you might want to Lojack it first. Watch the video on their website. I want one.
Wovel: World’s Safest Snow Shovel

12/28/09 2:30pm

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When I was in high school, they wouldn’t let girls take Shop, or boys take Home Ecch. I blame the gender biased teaching of the 1970′s for my inability to successfully tinker with electronic and electrical doodads. Because if I could, I would have built one of these babies a long time ago. What better accoutrement for a Victorian home and office could one have? And don’t forget the keyboard. Steampunk is an interesting phenomenon, with some amazingly inventive people working in the genre. The possibilities for inventive transformations of modern technology are only as limited as the imagination. The site’s creator, Jake Von Slatt, shows how to build one of these, so get out those tools!
Photo: Jake Von Slatt/steampunkworkshop.com.

12/23/09 10:00am

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An awning has gone up on the old Celine clothing store space on 5th Avenue between Sackett and Degraw saying a vintage shop named Yona Lee is going to fill the storefront. Per a reader, the vintage store will be the fourth such business on this stretch of 5th Avenue: “This strip is becoming quite the vintage row…Beacon’s Closet up on Warren and 5th, Odd Twin on Lincoln and 5th…Monkeys’ Whistles & Motorbikes is also on this block between Lincoln and Berkeley.” GMAP

10/09/09 10:01am

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A construction fence recently went up in the gutted building on 5th Avenue between Degraw and Sackett that’s hosted the Socksmith—that guy who sold socks, belt buckles and other stuff—for some time now. (Here is Park Slope had an interesting writeup about him a few months back.) We’re not likely to see the Socksmith in that location again because DOB permits show the space is being renovated, and a person working in the vintage shop next door, which is called Monkey Whistles and Motor Bikes, said they’d be moving into the fixed-up digs when construction’s complete. GMAP DOB

09/21/09 10:45am

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According to online finance site Mint.com, residents of Brooklyn cut back on spending in 2009 in the first half of the year more than any other city in the United States. Compared to 2008, the average Brooklynite has spent 28 percent less this year, whereas the national average for spending per person dropped only 13 percent. One caveat: Mint.com collects data from its users; thus the sample pool for the spending data is self-selecting and most likely an inaccurate representation of the U.S. Even with Mint.com’s particular demographic in mind, it’s an interesting observation. Also, if you take a look at the graphic, you’ll see that the greatest decreases in spending for which Mint.com has data were in New York and California—states with cities that rank highest for cost of living in the U.S.
The Most Frugal Cities in America [Mint.com]