42 west street greenpoint 82014

Eight years after a 10-alarm fire engulfed several of its buildings, Greenpoint Terminal Market’s vacant warehouses are finally seeing some new life. 67 West Street, a five-story brick warehouse that survived the fire, has since been transformed into event spaces for weddings, galleries and artist studios. And across the street, a 65,000-square-foot factory building at 42 West Street (pictured) is slowly being converted to commercial space. (more…)

greenpoint-houses-monitor-street-082814

Greenpoint has a charming old-world European feel, as anyone who has visited its Polish grocery stores knows, but house prices have moved into the stratosphere in the last two years, despite new apartment developments. A look at the area in the Times real estate section yesterday started off with a slightly misleading anecdote about a couple who almost gave up but then found their dream house there – in 2011.

Prices for two and three family row houses, most clad in vinyl siding and often in need of renovation, have risen from $750,000 to $850,000 in 2012 to $1,300,000 to $2,000,000 today, according to the story. The story also described other amenities in the area, including “destination restaurants” — and the ever-popular “destination” donut maker, Peter Pan — as well parks and schools.

The coming of 5,500 new units over 22 acres at Greenpoint Landing was noted briefly in passing without additional comment. Notably, the story did not mention “Girls.”

Living in Greenpoint [NY Times]
Photo by Bridge and Tunnel Club

22 clay street greenpoint

The wrecking ball may be coming soon for several buildings in the Harte and Company Factory complex in Greenpoint, where the developer filed demolition permits earlier this month. Applications have been filed to knock down 71 Dupont Street, 93 Dupont Street, 22 Clay Street, 26 Clay Street (pictured above), 30 Clay Street and 32 Clay Street. However, no permits have been filed for the main factory building at 280 Franklin Street, a big Arte Moderne structure from the 1930s. The developer, Dupont Street Developers LLC, hasn’t said whether the building and its unique curved glass facade will be part of the site’s planned residential project. (more…)

1059 manhattan avenue greenpoint 82014

Six stories out of seven have risen at this long-stalled site at 1059 Manhattan Avenue between Freeman and Eagle Streets in Greenpoint. Eventually, the seven-story apartment building will have 23 units spread across 19,867 square feet, per new building permits.

Demolition permits were filed in 2000 and building permits were filed in 2003. When we first wrote about it way back in 2007, we asked, “anyone know why it’s taking so long?” Little did we know that it was only half way there. The architect of record is Asher Herkowitz. The current owner, an LLC, bought the 21,000-square-foot property in 2012 for $2,900,000.

Development Watch: 1059 Manhattan Avenue [Brownstoner] GMAP

1133_Manhattan_Ave

Nearly 60,000 people have applied for the 105 affordable units that will be available at 1133 Manhattan Avenue in Greenpoint according to the Daily News. The 58,832 applications for the building was the highest number for any affordable housing project in the city. When completed, likely in the fall according to the developers website, the building will be half market rate rentals and half income-restricted. The income caps range from a single person earning $18,618 to qualify for a studio to, at the high end, a family of four with a combined income of $146,825 for a two bedroom apartment. (more…)

79 quay street rendering greenpoint 82014

Developer Cayuga Capital Management plans to convert a large brick warehouse at 79 Quay Street in Greenpoint into townhouses and build a boxy apartment building behind it, according to New York YIMBY. The cube-filled apartment building will rise six stories tall and wrap over the warehouse-turned-townhouses, which are pictured on the left side of the rendering. All told, the development will be 60,000 square feet. Gowanus-based architects Cycle Cities will design the project. Cayuga and Cycle Cities are also collaborating on a 12-story office and retail development at 87 Wythe Avenue in Williamsburg, reported by the WSJ on Monday.

The developer purchased the 23,500-square-foot warehouse at Quay and West Streets for $3,800,000 in March, according to public records. What do you think of the design?

Revealed: 79 Quay Street [NY YIMBY]

45 india street greenpoint 82014

A four-story, seven-unit condo building we first wrote about last year has risen three stories at 45 India Street in Greenpoint. Lubrano Ciavarra Architects is designing the building, which will feature a “corduroy” brick facade, according to the architects.

The 9,920-square-foot development will have two one-bedroom units on the ground floor, one of which will have a private garden and terrace, two two-bedroom, two-bath apartments on each of the second and third floors, and a three-bedroom penthouse on the top level. Each unit will have its own independent HVAC system, washer/dryer and cellar storage unit. The development’s amenities will include a shared garden, terrace and gym. We found a rendering on the fence that matches the one we published last year. Click through to see it.

Rendering and Details About New Greenpoint Build [Brownstoner] GMAP
(more…)

74 kent street greenpoint

Developer Caerus Group is in contract to buy one of the landmarked Eberhard Pencil Factory buildings at 74 Kent Street in Greenpoint for “close to” $8,000,000, according to a company spokesperson. They plan to restore the vacant building and convert it to office space, much like the Kickstarter HQ next door at 58 Kent.

(more…)

brooklyn-expo-center-79-franklin-081414

The Brooklyn Expo Center, a convention center at 79 Franklin Street in Greenpoint, was looking close to done when we dropped by Tuesday. It will open September 13 and 14 with the Brooklyn Antiques and Book Fair, according to The Brooklyn Paper. The owner is controversial developer Joshua Guttman, whose Greenpoint Terminal Market and four other properties have burned in suspicious fires, although he has never been implicated, said the paper. (more…)

tree care

If you want to help make Greenpoint and Williamsburg a little greener, you can plant and take care of trees with the Human Impacts Institute every Tuesday through the beginning of September. Volunteers clean up, aerate and mulch tree beds, as well as plant bulbs in tree bed soil. For the month of August, green thumbs can meet up at P.S. 31, located at 75 Meserole Avenue (at the corner of Lorimer Street) every Tuesday morning from 10 am to noon. The one exception will be next Tuesday, when “Tree Care Tuesday” will take place in the evening from 5 pm to 7 pm. Check out the institute’s calendar for more details. Participants should RSVP by emailing info@humanimpactsinstitute.org or calling (917) 727 9761.

Photo via Human Impacts Institute

723 Manhattan Ave, Meserole Theater. CB, PS

Name: Former Meserole Theater, now Rite Aid Pharmacy
Address: 723 Manhattan Avenue
Cross Streets: Norman and Meserole Avenues
Neighborhood: Greenpoint
Year Built: 1921
Architectural Style: Neo-Classical Georgian
Architect: Eugene DeRosa
Other Buildings by Architect: Brooklyn — Terminal Theater, Park Slope, Kenmore Theater, Flatbush. Manhattan — 8th Street Playhouse, Times Square Theater, Broadway Theater, Apollo Theater (42nd Street).. Also St. George Theater on Staten Island, and other theaters in NYC and around the country
Landmarked: No

The story: The Meserole family was one of the five founding families of Greenpoint. Jan Meserole came to this area in 1663 and settled in. The family homestead was centered here, and the family mansion stood on the site of this former theater. In 1919, when plans for this building were announced, the old mansion house was home to the Young Women’s Hebrew Association. It was quickly torn down, and Sol Brill, a well-known theater and amusement park impresario had this theater built.

It’s a deceptive building, at least the entrance is. The narrow lot on Manhattan Avenue would lead one to believe that this is a very small building. It’s only got a 25 foot width on the Manhattan side, in what looks like a one story building scarcely big enough for any kind of theater. But walk down the length of the lobby, and the building opens up to a huge theater space, all of which faces out onto Lorimer Street. When the Meserole Theater opened in 1921, it had seating for two thousand people. (more…)