Brooklyn borough president Eric Adams wants to revive the affordable housing development on a 30-acre piece of land known as the Broadway Triangle. Sandwiched between Bed Stuy, Williamsburg and Bushwick along Broadway near Flushing, the controversial development was halted by a judge’s injunction following a lawsuit by community groups arguing the plans and a rezoning of the area favored Hasidic families and discriminated against blacks and Latinos. In a written review of an unrelated project at 695 Grand Street in Williamsburg, Adams called on the de Blasio administration to resolve the legal dispute so housing can be built, Crain’s reported.

He also called on HPD to get on with the redevelopment of the Greenpoint Hospital site at 300 Skillman Avenue in East Williamsburg, which stalled in 2012 after the developer dropped out. The city planned to create about 250 affordable apartments at the site, which has been shuttered since 1982. The Broadway Triangle Community Coalition told Crain’s it has recently been talking with the city about the rezoning. The Triangle project could add another 600 affordable units, according to Crain’s.

One thing that has changed: Former State Assemblyman Vito Lopez, the king of affordable housing in the area, was heavily involved in the Triangle project, but is no longer in office. The nonprofit group he created to deliver services to constituents, the Ridgewood Bushwick Senior Citizen’s Council, which still exists and continues to be a big landlord and developer in Latino-heavy Bushwick, was one of two developers in the Triangle project, along with nonprofit partner United Jewish Organizations.

Do you think it’s a coincidence that Adams is calling for development of Broadway Triangle now that Lopez is out of the picture?

Brooklyn BP Acts to Restart Two Rez Projects [Crain's]
Broadway Triangle Coverage [Brownstoner]
Image via Urban Omnibus

meryl meisler bushwick burning

The Brooklyn Historical Society is hosting a panel on Bushwick’s 1970s arson wave, when the FDNY battled 100 fires a month, moderated by Jonathan Mahler, a New York Times reporter and author of “Ladies and Gentlemen, the Bronx is Burning.” The panel, called “Brooklyn’s on Fire: Bushwick Is Burning,” will feature photographer Meryl Meisler, a tenant lawyer, an FDNY fire marshal, a community board manager and a displaced resident, who will recount their memories of a neighborhood scarred by fire, bankruptcy and urban neglect.

Meisler, who taught in Bushwick during the ’80s, recently published a book with photos of the ‘hood from the late ’70s and early ’80s. The panel will take place at the Brooklyn Historical Society on Monday, November 17 at 6:30 pm. Tickets are $5 or free for members.

Meisler will also discuss her book, “A Tale of Two Cities, Disco Era Bushwick,” at the Brooklyn Central Library on Grand Army Plaza from 7 to 8 pm this Wednesday, October 29.

Photo by Meryl Meisler

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Dixon is finishing up construction and started leasing another group of properties in Brooklyn, most of them in Bed Stuy and Bushwick. We toured three of them, all in Bed Stuy, and found Dixon is getting faster and better at renovation.

Most of the renovations will be completed in less than a year. Some of the properties had severe water damage, requiring extensive work ranging from gut renovation to replacing some or all structural components such as joists and beams. Dixon is using contractors with experience restoring townhouses in Brooklyn and Harlem, such as All Renovation. Dixon managers oversee each site. An in-house designer creates a unique plan for every house and specs and sources all components, finishes and appliances before construction starts, which speeds things along.

We were impressed with the creative and appropriate use of finishes in each townhouse. In a narrow Romanesque Revival townhouse at 513 MacDonough (pictured after the jump) that had been covered with faux panelling and laminate flooring over the years — all of that was ripped out — an oak plank veneer (a new product engineered to withstand moisture) was used to impressive effect on a kitchen island and on a wall in a bathroom.

The quality of the bathrooms, kitchens, closets and other features was already high, but now is even better in the properties we saw. Dixon townhouses now typically have en-suite bathrooms for every bedroom and extensive closet and pantry systems with built-in shelves. One house even had two laundry rooms. They all have landscaped yards and often decks with huge, custom made floor to ceiling windows that open like doors. Two of the houses we saw this time had Aga Legacy stoves, which retail for around $6,000. An extremely luxurious all-marble bathroom at 14 Monroe spanned the width of the house in front and had both a clawfoot tub and shower.

Dixon has also done work to preserve the historic exteriors of the houses, such as redoing the limestone and brownstone facades and ironwork. At 14 Monroe, pictured below, the original 19th century ironwork was missing, and Dixon reproduced it using a mold from a neighbor, who had already restored his own. (more…)

1182 Putnam Combo

This recently renovated two-bedroom in Bushwick would work well as a share. The bedrooms are at opposite ends of the apartment, and the living room is a decent size. There’s an updated kitchen, hardwood floors and a dishwasher.

It’s about equidistant from the Halsey and Gates J/M/Z stops. At $1,850 a month, it’s less than a thousand dollars a room. Good deal?

1182 Putnam Avenue [Fillmore] GMAP

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A new small building at 51 Troutman Street in Bushwick officially launched leasing yesterday, starting at $2,076 for a 526-square-foot one bedroom, rental agent Modern Spaces announced. There are eight units in the four story building, which is located near Silent Barn and the Myrtle Broadway JMZ stop. The most expensive unit in the building is a three-bedroom duplex, renting for $3,323 a month. One month of rent is free.

Finishes include hardwood floors, oversize windows, and Ceasarstone counters. There are hookups for washers and dryers but no actual appliances. BuzzBuzzHome was the first to spot the listings.

Two years ago the site was an empty lot. The property changed hands for $450,000 in 2013, and the owner uses a mail drop on Lee Avenue in South Williamsburg.

Click through for more photos. What do you think of the design, location and pricing?

51 Troutman Listings [Modern Spaces] GMAP
(more…)

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After only 11 months, “Girls” star Zosia Mamet and boyfriend actor Evan Jonigkeit are selling their house in Bushwick, as Bushwick Daily was the first to report. They don’t seem to have changed the interior much, except to paint the kitchen cabinets white.

The house at 896 Flushing Avenue was already gut renovated without a shred of original detail left when they purchased it. Flushing Avenue is an extremely busy street and truck thoroughfare, and the house is across the street from the huge Rheingold Brewery complex, soon to be a construction site.

Although the house is 22 feet wide and technically a six-family, we thought they overpaid at the time when they purchased it for $1,000,000. Now they are asking $1,600,000. Do you think they will get it? And what does this mean for Bushwick?

Zosia Mamet Is Flipping the Pink Building She Bought in Bushwick Less Than a Year Ago [BK Daily]
OMG! Zosia Mamet Buys a House in Bushwick [Brownstoner]
Photo by Christopher Bride for PropertyShark

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Rabsky Group, a partner in Read Property’s gigantic Rheingold development in Bushwick, has picked up 12 mostly empty lots close by, according to public records. Rabsky paid $53,000,000 for the 12 residentially zoned lots on Bushwick between Montieth and Forrest streets. One of the sellers was Read Property; the other one was Princeton Holdings, according to a story in The Real Deal.

No addresses were given for the parcel in the story, but the group is filed in public records under 501 Bushwick Avenue. The ramshackle block consists mostly of empty lots and parking lots across from a car wash and the Rheingold Gardens affordable housing complex. It is also not far from the Bushwick Houses public housing complex on the corner of Flushing and Bushwick.

Current zoning (R6a) will limit development here to six or seven stories.

Read and Princeton still own properties covering the remaining quarter of the block, as well as more lots across Montieth Street. Bushwick has been roaring with construction since the summer, and development of these properties will further transform this side of Bushwick.

Dushinsky Pays $53 Million for Big Bushwick Development Site [TRD] GMAP
Photo by Google Maps

797 Broadway, SB, PS

Brooklyn, one building at a time.

Name: Mixed use commercial loft building
Address: 797 Broadway
Cross Streets: Corner Fayette Street
Neighborhood: Bushwick
Year Built: Mid to late 1880s
Architectural Style: Romanesque Revival
Architect: Probably/perhaps Theobald Engelhardt
Other Buildings by Architect: Factories, breweries, row houses, private homes, churches, loft buildings, warehouses, and more, mostly here in the Eastern District of Bushwick/Williamsburg/Eastern Bed Stuy
Landmarked: No

The story: Brooklyn’s Broadway is one of those great streets that needs to be walked. If you are interested in architecture, Broadway can be immensely frustrating, because the elevated tracks obscure everything, including some great commercial architecture. The tracks also make decent photography of those buildings next to impossible. If you are in a car, you miss a lot of details, and if you are driving that car, your eyes should be on the street, because Broadway seems to bring out the crazy in drivers. But the good stuff is there, nonetheless, and if you get a chance, start walking and look up once in a while. One of the buildings you see may be this one, on the corner of Broadway and Fayette Street, between Park and Flushing Avenues. (more…)

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Developer Read Property Group is moving ahead with its massive for-profit development that will transform Bushwick. Permits for the first of 10 buildings were filed yesterday, as New York YIMBY was the first to report.

The building at 123 Melrose Street (outlined in the right bottom corner, above) will have eight stories and 385 units over 285,000 square feet of residential space. YIMBY notes that works out to an average of just under 740 square feet per unit. The Schedule A calls for 64 units per floor on the middle floors, with 11 units on the penthouse level. It sounds like rentals, although we don’t know that for sure. The developer agreed to make 30 percent of the apartments in the complex affordable in exchange for a zoning variance granted in the last days of the Bloomberg administration, though we don’t know how many affordable units this particular building will have. The mostly empty site was previously zoned for industrial use only.

Bushwick has a significant amount of affordable housing, much of it built under the reign of ex-state Assemblyman Vito Lopez, but the size of this for-profit complex will probably rival only Hope Gardens, public housing built on the ruins of the fires that swept Bushwick in the 1970s.

Permits Filed: 123 Melrose Street, 385-Unit Rheingold Brewery Building in Bushwick [NYY]
Rheingold Coverage [Brownstoner]
Image by Meredith Hoffman for DNAinfo

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The striking and prominent house at 1020 Bushwick Avenue sold last year and is now being renovated. We noticed a few weeks ago that it is empty inside, and when we stopped by this past weekend, it looked like work had started.

We’re guessing the new owner intends to live there and is restoring the interior, based on what we can discern from looking at public records. The house was previously occupied by a member of the family who owned it for many years, and his extensive vinyl record collection was visible through the parlor floor windows at night.

The house sped to contract in less than one month and sold for $1,210,000 one year ago, $321,000 above the asking price of $889,000. Interior photos can still be viewed at the Douglas Elliman website.

The Queen Anne style house was built in 1888 and designed by architect Frank Keith Irving. It is part of a Linden Street row with unusual and exotic ornamentation. There is a face on the dormer facing Linden Street and terra cotta dragons under the cornice. It was a Building of the Day in 2011. More details can be seen on Montrose Morris’ Flickr page.

There may be more interior detail left than the photos show. The listing says the house has “multiple wood burning fireplaces, crown molding, a tin ceiling and ceiling medallions.”

1020 Bushwick Avenue Listing [Douglas Elliman]
Building of the Day: 1020 Bushwick Avenue [Brownstoner] (more…)

30 linden street bushwick 92014

One thing this listing has going for it are the brownstone details, which are rare in Bushwick. The three-story house at 30 Linden Street is a fairly late Victorian, in the style of many Crown Heights buildings, with paneling and an ornate screen in the hall and elaborate plaster details in the hall and an apartment.

It will be delivered vacant, says the listing, but it needs work. There are six “Class A” units, and no C of O. It’s also a lis pendens. (There is also a long list of complaints against the landlord, including dozens from this year, and a judgement against him in 2009 for heat and hot water, as well as a pending court case about the same.)

The owner tried to sell in 2011 and 2012 but was unsuccessful. It’s being marketed as an investment property, and there is FAR for an addition. Given all this, though, we find the ask of $1,499,000 ambitious.

30 Linden Street [Elliman] GMAP

1090 greene avenue bushwick bohack house

We were relieved to see the Landmarks Preservation Commission voted yesterday to landmark 1090 Greene Avenue in Bushwick. It is one of the last well-preserved wood frame houses in the area. Preservation advocate Historic Districts Council called it “a distinctive reminder of 19th-century Bushwick.”

It is rare for the LPC to landmark wood frame houses, perhaps because they are so often altered beyond recognition. (more…)