77 commercial street greenpoint

The waterfront megadevelopment at 77 Commercial Street in Greenpoint is kicking into high gear this week with three new building applications for towers at 77, 85 and 87 Commercial Street. CetraRuddy Architecture filed plans for a 30-story, 224-unit building at No. 77 and a 40-story, 296-unit building at No. 87. The two high-rises will reach 306 feet and 402 feet into the air, easily dwarfing everything else near the Greenpoint waterfront.

The final building at No. 85 will be only six stories tall but hold 200 apartments spread across 230,149 square feet. It will also have 300 underground parking spots, 360 bike storage spaces, MTA offices and parking, ground-floor retail and the development’s leasing office, according to Schedule A filings. Developer Chetrit Group has promised to set aside 200 units of affordable housing and work with the city to create Box Street Park. 

Meanwhile, site work began last month at the Greenpoint Landing, which is next door on Commercial Street and will eventually include 10 towers, four acres of park land and a K through 8 school.

77 Commercial Street Coverage [Brownstoner]
Rendering by CentraRuddy and MPFP via WSJ

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A tipster sent us this photo of the restoration work under way at 232 Carlton Avenue, the once badly deteriorated St. Mark’s Protestant Episcopal Church where a conversion to 12 condo units has been in the works for years.

The developers “appear to be successfully repairing the stone on the church on the Adelphi side, which was the hottest of messes before,” the tipster told us. “I wouldn’t have thought it possible it could look so good. Real slate roof, copper details — bravo.”

The landmarked building is now known as Carlton Mews. It is related to the Carlton Mews townhouse development at 231 Adelphi Street where a worker was tragically killed in an accident in 2012, but the two sites have different owners.

Scaffolding Goes up at Carlton Mews Church Conversion in Fort Greene [Brownstoner]

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The developer of the Ace Hotel at 61 Bond Street in Downtown Brooklyn is requesting a variance from the city to build it. There will be a public hearing tonight at a meeting of Community Board 2′s Land Use Committee to consider the request. This will be the only opportunity the public will have to comment on the matter, according to a letter that went out to neighbors earlier this month (click through to see the letter).

Confusingly, the letter did not state what exactly the developer is seeking the variance for. The rumor is the developer wants to build higher than current zoning permits, and put a bar and pool on the roof, according to a tipster who sent us the letter. The neighbors are worried, our tipster said, adding, “I was excited by Ace developing the site (vs. the typical schlock hotels that tend to get developed in Downtown Brooklyn) and remain hopeful it will be a positive.”

If you want to speak at the meeting, you must call the community board district office at 718-596-5410. The meeting will take place at 6 pm tonight in Room LC400 at the Dibner Building at the NYU Polytechnic School of Engineering at 5 MetroTech Center.

The hotel will replace a parking lot, above. An application for a new building permit was disapproved in August.

Permits Filed for Brooklyn’s Ace Hotel [Brownstoner]
Photo by Google Maps via NYY

Update: The developer would like to add density (more square feet), not height. Anyone who wishes to testify tonight can do so by signing in before the hearing, CB2 District Manager Robert Perris let us know in a comment below.

(more…)

250 ashland place rendering 92014

New York YIMBY dug up a rendering of 250 Ashland Place, aka BAM North Site 1, we haven’t seen before, and it is looking sleek.

The image shows the south side of the 52-story mixed-income tower, which is rising at the corner of Fulton Street in the BAM Cultural District, as it will be seen from Lafayette Avenue, behind Theater for a New Audience. FXFOWLE is designing the 586-unit high-rise, which will have 281 affordable units and 305 market rate ones.

Gotham Organization and DT Salazar are developing the project on a former city-owned parking lot.

New Look: 250 Ashland Place in Downtown Brooklyn [NYY]
City Plans 52-Story High Rise for BAM North Site I in BAM Cultural District in Fort Greene [Brownstoner] GMAP

church of the redeemer boerum hill

Real estate investment firm The Jackson Group has paid $20,000,000 for the Gothic Revival Church of the Redeemer in Boerum Hill, DNAinfo reported. Neighbors spent years fighting to preserve the 127-year-old structure at the corner of Pacific Street and 4th Avenue, but the Episcopal Diocese of Long Island began marketing the church as a development site last year. Church officials told DNAinfo that “mounting monthly costs” forced them to sell the building, which needs an estimated $4,000,000 in repairs.

The deal does not include space for the congregation, which was part of the church’s original plans to sell the property. The sale closed the week of September 5, but it hasn’t hit the public records yet. The Jackson Group hasn’t revealed whether they’re going to demolish the building, which sits on a lot zoned for a building as large as 70,000 square feet and up to 10 stories tall, a source told us.

Boerum Hill’s Church of the Redeemer Sells for $20 Million [DNAinfo]
Sale and Demolition Planned for 4th Avenue’s Church of the Redeemer [Brownstoner]
Photo by Nicholas Strini for PropertyShark

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The glitzy (but short) three-story mini-mall destined to replace the St. Vincent’s parking lot on a busy corner of Atlantic Avenue is no more. Walls are finally rising, and permits were approved last month for an 11-story mixed retail and residential development. Click through to the jump to see renderings sent in by a commenter. Also, the address has changed and will now be 60, not 66, Boerum Place.

The first three levels will be retail, with a total of 46,428 square feet of commercial space. Floors 4 through 11 will house 75 apartments, according to the Schedule A filing.

The developer is Alex Adjmi of A&H Acquisitions. As far as we can tell from public records, the property is still owned and leased by the Catholic church.

We have to say, at this location, a taller building makes more sense and the new design is a big improvement over the old one. What do you think? GMAP (more…)

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You couldn’t give away a new-construction condo in Bushwick in 2009, but now new ones are starting to appear – along with Miley Cyrus twerking at parties there, apparently, as a story in The New York Times makes official. Brookland Capital has just launched sales at 13 Melrose Place, which is well located on the north side of Bushwick close to Flushing.

They weren’t aiming to attract families, because all the eight units in the building there are one-bedrooms. The condos are aimed at the first time buyer and intended to equal the cost of renting, Brookland Capital’s Boaz Gilad told the Times. “If they’re renting an apartment now for, let’s say, $2,400 a month, we price our units between $2,400 to $2,700 a month for mortgage, taxes and maintenance — but now they own the unit.” Asking prices for the units range from $389,000 to $733,000 (the latter for a one-bedroom duplex with windowless storage space).

Other developments are pushing into still marginal areas by the last Bushwick stops on the J train and L train. A condo development at 1300 Decatur Street, for example, is two blocks from the cemetery and a Superfund site in Ridgewood, Queens.

Much more common are new rental developments in the area. Construction is nowhere near started on the huge Rheingold Brewery development. Above, construction is well along at the block-long development of a church and school at 616 Bushwick Avenue, a rental development not mentioned in the Times article.

The rest of the article describes well-traveled territory such as how trendy Bushwick has become, displacement and rising rents. Interestingly, a new anti-gentrification group, Northwest Bushwick Community Group, which is helping residents stay in their homes, is asking the city to start tracking displacement of residents. What do you think of that idea?

Bushwick Takes the Spotlight [NY Times]

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We were surprised to see Curbed reblog a story of ours about the third Edge tower from December yesterday but appreciate the shoutout. Later, Curbed tracked down a rendering of the tower we haven’t seen before.

The design looks pretty similar to the other Edge buildings. There is one big difference, however, that stands out: Apparently the tower at 2 North 6th Place will be dark colored. In fact, it looks black in the rendering. The other Edge buildings are glassy and white.

Has the Edge gone goth? What do you think of the design?

Photo by Curbed

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We were saddened to find this ad marketing a circa-1900 standalone wood frame house in East Flatbush as a development site for $1,000,000. Instead of describing the home, CPEX notes that the house at 780 New York Avenue sits on a 2,500-square-foot lot that’s zoned for a building as large as 10,000 square feet. A potential developer could also take advantage of the property’s 421-a tax abatement.

It seems like the house is being flipped after selling for $480,000 in May. It’s located across the street from SUNY Downstate, just outside the Prospect Lefferts Gardens border.

Photo by Nicholas Strini for PropertyShark

112 atlantic avenue cobble hill

Cobble Hill’s last remaining gas station at 112 Atlantic Avenue is biting the dust, and a four-story residential building will rise in its place. New York YIMBY first spotted the new building application for the 23,355-square-foot project at the corner of Henry and Atlantic. It will have eight apartments scattered across 17,355 square feet — which works out to about 2,000 square feet per apartment — along with 6,000 square feet of shops on the ground floor.

There will also be an automated parking garage for eight cars, a bike storage room and private roof decks for two units on the top floor. Angelo Cosentini’s On the Level is developing the building, and BKSK Architects are the architects of record.

Permits Filed: 112 Atlantic Avenue, Cobble Hill [NYY] GMAP
Atlantic Avenue Gas Station in Cobble Hill Likely to Be Lost [Brownstoner]
Photo by Nicholas Strini for PropertyShark

120 union avenue williamsburg

Developers of big Gowanus project 470 4th Avenue, Adam America, Slate Property Group and Israeli-based Naveh Shuster Limited, are moving into south Williamsburg with plans for two plots. The three developers purchased 120 Union Avenue for $15,500,000 this week, and are set to close on a site across the street at 100 Union Avenue for $6,000,000 by the end of the year, The Real Deal reported.

The group plans to spend $65,000,000 to build a six-story rental development with ground floor retail at the first address. The 75,000-square-foot building will hold 100 rental units and 2,000 square feet of shops. (more…)