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Arts in Bushwick’s “Making History” pays homage to local artists by featuring exactly 400 of them in a special exhibition at Storefront Ten Eyck. The show will survey the Bushwick arts scene by including diverse artists with studios in Bushwick, who have had studios in Bushwick over the past 10 years, or who have recently participated in Bushwick gallery shows.

The exhibition, which runs from April 19 through May 10, will culminate with a benefit event. Ticket sale proceeds will go towards publishing a book celebrating Arts in Bushwick and commemorating the tenth anniversary of its Bushwick Open Studios.

You can see the full list of artists here. Tickets to the May 10 benefit are $200 and include one piece of work from a local artist. For more information or to buy tickets, go here.

Image by Arts in Bushwick

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Forget the renderings. The condos at 4 Downing Street, in the building formerly known as the Broken Angel, are very beautiful in person.

The design and finishes are restrained, carefully considered, and meticulously constructed. We toured one finished model apartment as well as several others under construction Thursday.

A few artifacts from Arthur Wood’s Broken Angel remain. (more…)

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The Acoustic Ecology Festival will take over the Old Stone House and surrounding park in Park Slope next week. Acoustic ecology — the study of how the acoustic environment affects those creatures living within it — has grown over several decades to include composers, sound artists and even scientists. Throughout the festival artists will perform, conduct talks and guide sound walks around the Old Stone House. (more…)

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A highly anticipated installation at the Flatbush Trees will happen May 18 through May 22, artist Dave Eppley told Community Board 9 last week. Eppley has been working for the last six months with students at a nearby school to design flower bouquets made out of sign vinyl that will be applied to the dilapidated 1970s-era tree sculptures, located at the intersection of Ocean Avenue, Flatbush Avenue and Empire Boulevard, right across from Prospect Park.

Apparently made of concrete and some other weather-impervious material, the tree-shaped sculptures also serve as a street signs and mark a park entrance.

A sign maker by trade as well as an installation artist, Eppley said he does not expect the decorations to last more than a few years, and that is intentional. “I hope another artist will adopt [the Trees] as their own in a year or two,” and do something else with them, he said.

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The Transit Museum is hosting its yearly “Platform” performances inspired by mass transit and urban development next week, where attendees can experience animation, dance, film and interactive art pieces. In a decommissioned subway station on Court Street, the Shakedown Dance Collective will perform “riffs on real-life NYC transit experiences collected from the general public” — including manspreading and public drunkenness.

Genevieve DuBose will host a museum-wide game of human bingo, and Bob Goldberg will present a video time-capsule and live accordion journey based on riding the subway through Brooklyn and Manhattan. There will also be a two-man play based on the demolition of the old Penn Station, and live comedy inspired by conversations overheard in a subway car. (more…)

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Artists, developers, gallery owners and community leaders will gather at Brooklyn Borough Hall Friday morning for a conference on creating and preserving art along the Brooklyn waterfront. The event, “Spaces and Places,” will explore the history of art in the borough. Artists and gallery owners will discuss how art has been made, shown and sold along the Brooklyn waterfront and the issues facing those who make and display art there.

Speakers include Tom Finkelpearl, commissioner of NYC’s Department of Cultural Affairs; Deborah Schwartz, president of the Brooklyn Historical Society; Borough President Eric Adams; Anita Durst, artistic director of chashama; Kathleen Gilrain, executive director of Smack Mellon; Lisa Kim of Two Trees; and Greg O’Connell Jr. of the O’Connell Organization.

See the full list of speakers here. The Brooklyn Historical Society and CUNY’s Brooklyn Waterfront Research Center are organizing the free event, which you can register for through Eventbrite.

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Crown Heights was once home to the city’s first black-owned gay club – the Starlite Lounge at 1084 Bergen Street, on the corner of Nostrand Avenue. Filmmaker Kate Kunath set out to chronicle the bar’s 50-year legacy in “We Came to Sweat,” which premiered last year and will screen tomorrow at the Queens World Film Festival in Jackson Heights. She told Vice the film began as an effort to save the bar, “the oldest black-owned, non-discriminating club,” which was sold in 2009 and finally shuttered for good in 2010. The whole interview is worth reading, but one quote in particular caught our eye:

“There was this unspoken common ground of the patrons, which was their willingness to say ‘f*ck the establishment!’ — whether that was over politics, religion, sexual shame, or social norms. And the energy of that was intoxicating. But what I took away from the plight is that nothing is permanent, progress is not a straight line and losing space is losing ground in the bigger picture.”

“We Came to Sweat” is screening tomorrow at 10 pm at P.S. 69 in Jackson Heights, Queens. Tickets are $12 or $9 for seniors and students, and available here. Pictured is the building in 2006, before the bar closed. It still stands, but a deli and dollar store have moved into the Starlite’s old space.

“We Came to Sweat” Tells the Story of New York City’s First Black-Owned Gay Club [Vice]
Starlite Coverage [Brownstoner]
Photo by Gregg Snodgrass for PropertyShark

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Artists and photographers who were part of the 2010 exhibition “The Gentrification of Brooklyn: The Pink Elephant Speaks,” will gather at the Brooklyn Historical Society tomorrow to discuss what it means to be a working artist — and maybe a gentrifier — living in the borough today. Dexter Wimberley, who curated the show at the Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Arts, will lead the discussion.

Panelists will explore “how they’ve survived (or thrived) in the years since the exhibition, and share how their art has been influenced by the rapid changes in the borough,” according to BHS. Artists Oasa Sun DuVerney, Nathan Kensinger and Sarah Nelson Wright will speak, as well as MoCADA director James Bartlett. The free panel will run from 6:30 to 8:30 pm tomorrow evening at BHS, and tickets are available here. Above, a painting by Tim Okumura from the exhibition.

Photo by Tim Okumura for Fort Greene Focus

Artist Jennifer Maravillas has spent the last three years walking all 9,000 blocks of Brooklyn and collecting trash to create a 10-foot-by-10-foot map of the borough, according to Animal New York. She recently finished the map, titled “71 Square Miles,” and it went on display yesterday at BRIC in Fort Greene. The Prospect Heights resident donned rubber gloves to pick up the refuse, tracking her movements in mainland Brooklyn first by labelling blocks and later with a running app. You can check out a digitized version of the map here or see it in person through September 6 as part of the “Mapping Brooklyn” group exhibition at BRIC.

Artist Finishes Trash Map of Brooklyn After Walking Every Single Block [Animal NY]
Video by Animal NY

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The Bushwick Community Darkroom is moving to a bigger space and expanding the types of processing it offers as well as classes and other events. Founder and Director Lucia Rollow, who is also one of the organizers of Bushwick Open Studios, plans to shut down the current darkroom in The Loom at 108 Thames during the month of March, then reopen at the new location at 110 Troutman Street at the beginning of April, she told us. The new space, which measures 2,400 square feet, will be renovated inside and out during the month of March.

This will be the third location for the darkroom, which Rollow started in the basement where she was living. The darkroom offers classes, darkroom rental and exhibitions.

To celebrate and raise funds for the move, there will be a party and art show on Tuesday, February 24, featuring photographs by Wilson Novitzki, Scott Nyerges, Caleb Savage, Rollow and Sarah Graham. Brooklyn bands, including Dan Zanes, will perform, and there will be rum punch from an El Dorado bartender. A RocketHub campaign to help with the move concludes at the end of the month.

The new darkroom will offer more space, more processing stations, and large-format and alternative-processing facilities. There will be a group darkroom with eight to 10 stations, a private dark room for black and white and other alternative processes, four private color darkrooms, and one 33-inch Colex RA4 processor, among other things. The darkroom will also expand its classes, including middle school after-school programs, and there will be lockers, movie nights, lectures and workshops.

Annual memberships cost $75 or $115 a month; a lifetime membership is $2,000. GMAP

Photo by Bushwick Community Darkroom