Park Slope’s P.S. 133 Opens in New Building

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P.S. 133, whose new admissions standards have been hailed as a model for diversity, opened this week in a new building on its former site at 610 Baltic Street in Park Slope. A reader sent in these photos of the campus, which serves 935 students from pre-kindergarten through fifth grade.

The new facility has 39 standard classrooms and six special education ones, as well as science labs, prep rooms, a kitchen, cafeteria, auditorium, library, gymnasium, medical suite, guidance offices, parent community rooms and administrative offices. And it incorporates part of the old school’s facade in its auditorium.

In a complicated deal last year, the Community Education Council approved a Park Slope school rezoning pushed by the Department of Education in exchange for a diversity program at P.S. 133 that gives preference to English language learners and students who qualify for free and reduced lunch.

“P.S. 133, in its new building, has become more than just a school, it has become a symbol of the value of diversity in New York City,” Council Member Brad Lander said in a prepared statement. The official ribbon cutting took place August 29. Click through to see more photos of the interior of the new building.

Park Slope School Rezoning Is a Go [Brownstoner]
More Drama from the P.S. 321 Rezoning [Brownstoner]
Development Watch: P.S. 133 Taking Shape [Brownstoner]
P.S. 133 Not Opening Until September 2013[Brownstoner] GMAP


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3 Comment

  • “PS 133, in its new building, has become more than just a school, it has become a symbol of the value of diversity in New York City,”

    You know what – how about it just becomes a symbol of quality education (beautiful building btw)

  • eradicator

    U might want to rotate the picture.

  • NeoGrec

    Good luck to the kids and their teachers. I hope this turns out to be a terrific school and an asset to the entire community. But on the matter of architecture, it gets a failing grade. I appreciate the attempt to recreate the classic gothic look of the original, but there’s something that really doesn’t work about the proportions of the the new building. From 4th Ave, it looks like a giant Lego construction. Lumpy shoe boxes, fitted awkwardly together with that oddly placed not-quite-corner tower. Maybe the architect was working off plans drawn up by the 3rd grade?