Revised School Rezoning Plan Divides Park Slope


The Department of Education’s revised plan for Park Slope school rezoning leaves parents cut out of P.S. 321 fuming, according to DNAinfo, although it doesn’t touch P.S. 39. The rezoning plans for P.S. 10 and 107 remain as they were proposed last month. The new rezoning plan calls for carving 13 blocks out of P.S. 321′s area. The new plan is “a better fit based on the feedback we’ve gotten,” said Department of Education Director of Planning Carrie Marlin at a public meeting last night where the new scenario was unveiled. The blocks cut out of P.S. 321′s zone fall west of 5th Avenue, as illustrated in the zoning map above. Children living in that area would attend a new elementary school at 211 8th Street, set to open next year. In response to charges that the rezoning would decrease diversity at P.S. 321, Marlin said it would have a “very very minimal impact,” taking the kindergarten class from 78 percent white to 81 percent white. The current plan calls for P.S. 321 assistant principal Elizabeth Garraway to run the new school.
DOE Releases New Rezoning Plan for Park Slope Schools [DNAinfo]
Plan No. 2 for Park Slope School Rezoning [Brownstoner]
Image from BOE via DNAinfo

85 Comment

  • How about initially to have the new school to covers the same zone as PS321. Parents with in the zone have the options to choose. Then lotto for PS321 seats. For the ones that didn’t get in they will attend the new school. That would give all the families within PS321 zone a fair shot. Once the new school is able to build a track record for itself, then we can start talk about rezoning. Maybe then they will have less resistance.

    • That idea would never fly. A kid living at President and 8th av having to walk to the new school on 4th av because of a lottery? And if a lottery is good for old 321 area, why not open it up to the whole city? If you stay with the devil’s bargain of zoned schools it is inevitable that the zone has to shrink. And that means some people are going to end up out of the zone.

      • I know the kids that getting zoned out would be glad to take that walk any day if they can remain in PS321. The walk from 3rd ave and President to the new school is not that much better anyway. think about walk 11 blocks on 4th Ave in the winter. The problem with this plan is, they are taking those blocks away from one of the best schools in the city and send them to a school of unknown.

        • Except they’re not. It’s not unknown. They’re giving those people the assistant principal from 321. If anything, this just shows that the DoE is actually responsive to shrill rich people and tries to accommodate them.

          I know one of the things that makes my school so wonderful (even though we are not 321) is that we have science labs, art rooms, a gym, phys ed classes, a media room, and all of the extras that schools with room can afford to have.

          I said it before, but I’ll say it again: 321, like the Park Slope Co-op is a victim of its own success. Spreading its good fortune (which, it might be worth mentioning was one of the things its namesake would approve of) instead of stockpiling it is the right thing to do.

        • Except they’re not. It’s not unknown. They’re giving those people the assistant principal from 321. If anything, this just shows that the DoE is actually responsive to shrill rich people and tries to accommodate them.

          I know one of the things that makes my school so wonderful (even though we are not 321) is that we have science labs, art rooms, a gym, phys ed classes, a media room, and all of the extras that schools with room can afford to have.

          I said it before, but I’ll say it again: 321, like the Park Slope Co-op is a victim of its own success. Spreading its good fortune (which, it might be worth mentioning was one of the things its namesake would approve of) instead of stockpiling it is the right thing to do.

        • 3rd Ave and President is not in 321 right now. It starts on the e side of 4th Ave.

        • Totally agree with you that the walk from President to the new school on 8th street is TOO FAR. Even in 1915 when they built the subways, they saw a need for two stops along this stretch! It makes far more sense to take from the 321 zone at 5th street or 4th street, much closer to 8th street.

  • what is going on with 133? beautiful brand new big building and it’s like DOE is pretending it doesn’t exist.

  • what is going on with 133? beautiful brand new big building and it’s like DOE is pretending it doesn’t exist.

  • I remember being pregnant and looking for an apartment in Brooklyn and every real estate agent I spoke with trying to steer me towards Park Slope and PS 321. I wasn’t interested, but it was kind of a battle, often met with utter incomprehension, when I tried to explain that. However, if I may (again!) comment from an outsider’s totally biased perspective, they’re setting up a new school for you people. Your children will still get all of the advantages and benefits they get at the old school, because their classmates will continue to have affluent parents. Furthermore, you’re even getting a principal FROM the old school. Are people really upset? I mean, really?

    I bet there will be organic milk and compostable lunch trays too. You know, the really important things.

    I’d think not having to walk up that hill in the snow would be a huge plus myself.

    • i’d rather walk up the hill in the snow than on 4th avenue, where kids are sure to get splashed by the cars speeding down the highway thru the slush.

      but the proposed building is nice (high ceilings!) and the prospect of small classes and more building space is positive.

      the yard facing 4th ave is a bit of a bummer.

      but i agree with you: same parent pool will make this school similar to others in quality.

    • thank you heather! best comment yet!

  • Do the solid lines include both sides of the street? For example 5th avenue eastside and 5th avenue westside…

  • Any way for childless park slopers living in the new 321 to make some $$$ off of this?

  • Heather is right. 321 is extremely crowded, to the extent where it’s starting to have an impact on the quality of education. Liz Garraway is terrific, and will do a great job as principal of the new school. The DOE seems committed to making this school a success. All of the anti-rezoning arguments I’ve heard seem to suffer from misinformation, false assumptions and some rather ugly targeting of families who have had to move out of zone – some of them, to be sure, planned it that way, but not the majority.
    Hopefully the open houses planned by the DOE will convince people that they’re not victims of “reverse discrimination,” as one parent opined. Really, rather than buying themselves a spot in one of the “best schools in the city with a million-dollar PTA” (sheesh), they’ll have a chance to build something great together, with 321′s guidance and (from all appearances) the DOE’s support.

  • Capping the number of students at 321 and putting a waitlist in place that puts priority of zoned kids above non-zoned kids and non-zoned siblings would help fix the big problem of 30-40% not even being zoned for the school. I do believe 321 can handle the existing child population if they were actually neighborhood kids. Fix that first, and then let’s see about permanently redrawing lines. Some will choose the new school after they see how it turns out, especially those nearer to 4th Ave who might not want to walk up the hill, or want to be closer to their subway commutes. But until that time, when the school establishes itself, it should be used as overflow from the 321 lottery or as a school of choice (for those who do want to take a chance).

    • non-zoned siblings are currently 3d priority, after zoned siblings and zoned kids. capping the school is an option but the demographics don’t support the notion that the school can support the population under current citywide DOE policies.

      • There needs to be a change to DOE policy to stop abuse of the system. It is common knowledge that people rent an apt in 321 just to get their kid in, and then move outside the zone. Redrawing the lines because of this pressure from cheaters is unfair to people who are playing by the rules and have bought in zone, planning to stay.

        • you can say there needs to be a change of DOE policy, but since these people are doing something that is expressly allowed by the DOE’s policy means that they are not “cheating.” they ARE playing by the rules! so let’s be clear: you think the rules need to be changed to protect only the people who can afford to live in the neighborhood forever, as opposed to what they do now, which is to protect the schools themselves from excessive mobility and to protect the children of people who can afford to live in the zone for at least one year. you may have thought you were playing by the rules, but from the DOE’s perspective, you weren’t really even in the game.

        • you can say there needs to be a change of DOE policy, but since these people are doing something that is expressly allowed by the DOE’s policy means that they are not “cheating.” they ARE playing by the rules! so let’s be clear: you think the rules need to be changed to protect only the people who can afford to live in the neighborhood forever, as opposed to what they do now, which is to protect the schools themselves from excessive mobility and to protect the children of people who can afford to live in the zone for at least one year. you may have thought you were playing by the rules, but from the DOE’s perspective, you weren’t really even in the game.

      • There needs to be a change to DOE policy to stop abuse of the system. It is common knowledge that people rent an apt in 321 just to get their kid in, and then move outside the zone. Redrawing the lines because of this pressure from cheaters is unfair to people who are playing by the rules and have bought in zone, planning to stay.

  • Capping the number of students at 321 and putting a waitlist in place that puts priority of zoned kids above non-zoned kids and non-zoned siblings would help fix the big problem of 30-40% not even being zoned for the school. I do believe 321 can handle the existing child population if they were actually neighborhood kids. Fix that first, and then let’s see about permanently redrawing lines. Some will choose the new school after they see how it turns out, especially those nearer to 4th Ave who might not want to walk up the hill, or want to be closer to their subway commutes. But until that time, when the school establishes itself, it should be used as overflow from the 321 lottery or as a school of choice (for those who do want to take a chance).

  • once again agreeing with heather! it really shows that people will complain about anything. our little snowflakes will have to walk along – clutch pearls – 4th avenue!! (isn’t that where they live?)

    at the same time, it’s very telling that the folks “put back” in 321 and 39 zones are the most affluent and it’s pretty obvious that the CEC, DOE and politicians are bowing to pressure from these same rich folks. i guess it probably does help that the DOE’s marc sternberg lives among the “haves” at PS 107. cynicism validated all ways around with this one.

  • once again agreeing with heather! it really shows that people will complain about anything. our little snowflakes will have to walk along – clutch pearls – 4th avenue!! (isn’t that where they live?)

    at the same time, it’s very telling that the folks “put back” in 321 and 39 zones are the most affluent and it’s pretty obvious that the CEC, DOE and politicians are bowing to pressure from these same rich folks. i guess it probably does help that the DOE’s marc sternberg lives among the “haves” at PS 107. cynicism validated all ways around with this one.

    • Actually, if I was a 39 parent I’d be very concerned. The school is already at capacity, with K waitlists for the last 2 years. The new condos under construction on 4th ave/6th st. will overburden the school all by themselves. One of the things parents like best about 39 is the small class size, which will be unsustainable once the new-condo kids start enrolling.

      • sure, the interests of the current parents (who want to keep their small class sizes by keeping their neighbors out) are not aligned with those of future parents (who will start trying to do the same…but only after their own kids are in). i don’t know anything about the new condos but i wouldn’t be surprised if the developers were, ahem, influence enough to be the tiebreaker between warring factions of parents. again, cynical me.

  • Heather your opinion might be better received if it wasnt so heavily laden with hostility (or is that just masqueraded envy?)

  • Poor people west of 4th Ave never had a chance against the well-oiled “liberal” money machine of Park Slope.

  • Admit it, Heather. You and your child are snowflakes, too. Just not 321 snowflakes. Because if you really wanted a racially diverse population, you’d be sending your kids to parochial school. How many times are you going to boast about finding a place to live that was NOT zoned for 321? Your snobbish pride is showing; the very thing you claim to detest about Park Slope. But in all your boasting, you haven’t said you don’t care about your child’s education, or that you sought a miserable school district for your child to prove your greater devotion to the common man. Is it really such a stretch to understand that parents–any parents, anywhere, yourself included–care about their children’s education? Try for a moment to recognize that all parents share a concern about quality education for their children, an increasingly limited commodity in the NYC school system, as in most urban areas. But if it suits you better to pretend you’re a yellow snowflake, without the money or influence, and contemptuous of the sea of white ones, brag on.

  • As has been mentioned by several posters, outdated attitudes (and knowledge) on the part of many brokers feeds the cycle of perception that 321 is THE place to be. Before you have a child in school, you really do not understand the various pros and cons of the many good schools in the area, and all you have to rely on is the broker’s notion of what schools are popular. Educate the brokers – that will help the fears of property value change (although the cynical might point out that brokers are not without their own motives).

    http:www.nycschoolmaps.com

  • The single important question that as far as I know has not been answered is who will ‘attend’ this new school.

    If it is only kids from the newly zoned area – within 2yrs the new school will be as good or better than 321 (overrated anyway) BUT if 15 uses this new school as an ‘extra’ school to stick all the people they dont want at their existing schools, the parents have every right to be pissed.
    Given how they divided up the new zoning plan it is clear who the DOE and D15 is concerned about – and therefore I suspect this new school will always be viewed as the ‘lesser’ school and will be forced to take all the D15 unwanted students as well.

    • My understanding is that the new school(wished that they have a name for it already) is for the proposed new zone only. The max occupancy for the new school is under 300. According to one of the parent’s research which based on the consensus data, it will be over crowded very soon as there are about 500 children under the age of 5 in the proposed new zone. If that study is correct then this new plan will not solve the over crowding issue. Also, this study only counted the blocks that were in the previous plan only.

      • I can’t believe I’m saying this, but I have to think the DOE would have at least looked at the census data. With 500 kids under 5, that’s around 100 kindergarteners. Seems the DOE is projecting that around half of them will need the zoned school (given the school size), and that doesn’t seem unreasonable. Considering families grandfathered in to 321, people leaving the zone and entering it, and families that will choose private schools or other “choice” public schools, etc., it actually seems about right. And don’t forget that the PS 133 building is brand new and expected to house over 500 district 15 kids. I’m sure they are assuming that some percentage of those will be from this new zone – which is right next door to PS 133. And even if not, the new 133 (and all the charters the mayor’s going to ram through over the next 2 years) probably won’t directly effect this area of park slope, but they may reduce the pressure on the D15 choice schools like 372 and BNS.

      • Psloper – the max. occupancy for the new school is incorrect. If you’ve seen the school, it is significantly larger than PS 39, which currently has 339 kids. According to the DOE, and according to one’s own eyes, that occupancy number, found online, is an underestimate.
        That is one example of the misinformation that keeps getting thrown around in this argument.
        Another is the characterization of all out-of-zone 321 families as “cheaters.” It is terribly convenient for re-zoned families to believe this, and by nature of the issue, there is no data to doublecheck. It is much easier for parents to target an imaginary army of upper-middle-class parents “gaming the system” for a year, than to admit they’re trying to kick out a group of children who are much more diverse in every way than the so-called diversity of families west of 5th ave. *with kids under 5*.
        The census data does not give separate figures for those families with pre-k and grade-school children; if it did, their ethnic makeup would probably look a lot different from that of older families. And I’m not saying these one-year 321-zone residents don’t exist, they certainly do, but they are not the majority.

  • The single important question that as far as I know has not been answered is who will ‘attend’ this new school.

    If it is only kids from the newly zoned area – within 2yrs the new school will be as good or better than 321 (overrated anyway) BUT if 15 uses this new school as an ‘extra’ school to stick all the people they dont want at their existing schools, the parents have every right to be pissed.
    Given how they divided up the new zoning plan it is clear who the DOE and D15 is concerned about – and therefore I suspect this new school will always be viewed as the ‘lesser’ school and will be forced to take all the D15 unwanted students as well.

  • Helloooooo, anyone still here?
    I have no opinion about the rezoning.

    Where can I find information about schools?
    Are there any sites other than insideschools.org and greatschools.org?
    I found some information on insideschools outdated :(
    When I’m looking at schools, what should I be looking at besides the test scores?

    • expert_textpert, that is one of the reason why parents got zoned out are so upset. DOE so far only gave a them a empty building, the name of the principal but nothing else. Only after many complains then they finially scheduled an open house on the 19th at 6:30PM.
      besides the test scores I also look at class size, school PTAs. But test scores is the track record. Some would also look for diversity but I don’t think that is an issue in NYC public schools.

    • expert_textpert, that is one of the reason why parents got zoned out are so upset. DOE so far only gave a them a empty building, the name of the principal but nothing else. Only after many complains then they finially scheduled an open house on the 19th at 6:30PM.
      besides the test scores I also look at class size, school PTAs. But test scores is the track record. Some would also look for diversity but I don’t think that is an issue in NYC public schools.

    • I found asking around at playgrounds worked–not scientific, but it gave me an idea about what to look for. Parent messageboards have some information too–just actively solicit opinions, tour when the tours start ( early December, I think?) and see what you like. If you’re not expecting ponies, unicorns and compostable lunch trays, you’ll find many good options. Gentrified Brooklyn is so prosperous at this point that a lot of local energy is being invested in our schools–and there are many good ones.

    • I found asking around at playgrounds worked–not scientific, but it gave me an idea about what to look for. Parent messageboards have some information too–just actively solicit opinions, tour when the tours start ( early December, I think?) and see what you like. If you’re not expecting ponies, unicorns and compostable lunch trays, you’ll find many good options. Gentrified Brooklyn is so prosperous at this point that a lot of local energy is being invested in our schools–and there are many good ones.

  • people, CLASS SIZE MATTERS. If 321 has 25 to 30 kids in every class, that is not a desirable scenario in which to see one’s child get educated. I think Brklynmind is right, and the fear here has everything to do with non-white/affluent families attending the new school. Otherwise, these re-zoned families should be embracing the new place. Just think–speaking clean classrooms and potentially smaller classes. What could be better?

    • I agreed class size matter but to an extent. why are majority of the NYC schools have smaller class size than 321 but performed much worst?
      At the end how can one fault the parents that wanted good education for their children which they had planed for and now trying to fight for? Wished we can have this kind of arrugment at every NYC school then our public school system would be a lot better.

      • What I think you’re missing is that we do have these kind of arguments at every NYC school, they just don’t get the same kind of press that 321 does. I know in District 13 both 9 and 11 have exploded in enrollments. My daughter’s class had 32 students in September. (2 moved away, so it now has 30.)

        Our school also has a ton of kids from out of zone, people starting there and then moving out of zone, and suffers from some of the same pressures (to a much lesser extent) that 321 does. But I’m grateful there’s not the same mean-spirited attitude about it. I realize that sounds sanctimonious, but I’d be less so, if a debate about 321 and the zone changes could take place without the wangst. You’ve got people accusing others of cheating by changing apartments? People complaining about property values? Hand-wringing about diversity, but then turning around and worrying about too much diversity? From an outsider’s perspective, it’s a little much.

        • Wow, that’s rich, Heather! Every post on Brownstoner involving 321 provokes the most mean-spirited of comments FROM YOU.

          Since you’re an outsider, as you say, perhaps you should stop commenting on this altogether. It would be a welcome respite for those of us who are affected by the proposals, live in the relevant zones, and have an understanding of the issues. We are getting awfully tired of your sanctimony on this and really any Park Slope-related post.

          • Don’t you have a yoga class to go to, dandelion? If memory serves, your comments about district 13′s issues have always been so insightful and nuanced.

          • Looks like your memory doesn’t serve. And at least I lived in district 13. You haven’t lived in district 15, which as cupolacoffee so well points out, you never cease to boast about.

            A yoga class? How clever. Unfortunately I’m too busy working so I can afford to live in a good school district and not accept less and then pretend it’s my preference because I couldn’t afford better and am bitter and envious about it.

          • Looks like your memory doesn’t serve. And at least I lived in district 13. You haven’t lived in district 15, which as cupolacoffee so well points out, you never cease to boast about.

            A yoga class? How clever. Unfortunately I’m too busy working so I can afford to live in a good school district and not accept less and then pretend it’s my preference because I couldn’t afford better and am bitter and envious about it.

      • Psloper, what do you mean “performed worse”??? The DOE “grades” are a complete shame. Both PS 29 in Cobble Hill and PS 261 in Boerum Hill got C’s again this year. Yet most agree that they are both excellent schools. . . . As for test scores, if you have a homogenous white UMC class student body (a la 321), the test scores are going to be high. But you likely won’t end up with any diversity. I guess it depends what you’re looking for in an elementary school–for your kid to meet people who are only like him/her, or something else. I don’t blame parents for being upset they are being zoned out of 321 for an unknown school but “race” is the elephant in the room in all these dialogues. White professionals are simply terrified of being near people of color. They would rather have their kid sit in a classroom with 30 white kids and one overworked teacher than 21 kids, half of whom are black or Hispanic.

      • Psloper, what do you mean “performed worse”??? The DOE “grades” are a complete shame. Both PS 29 in Cobble Hill and PS 261 in Boerum Hill got C’s again this year. Yet most agree that they are both excellent schools. . . . As for test scores, if you have a homogenous white UMC class student body (a la 321), the test scores are going to be high. But you likely won’t end up with any diversity. I guess it depends what you’re looking for in an elementary school–for your kid to meet people who are only like him/her, or something else. I don’t blame parents for being upset they are being zoned out of 321 for an unknown school but “race” is the elephant in the room in all these dialogues. White professionals are simply terrified of being near people of color. They would rather have their kid sit in a classroom with 30 white kids and one overworked teacher than 21 kids, half of whom are black or Hispanic.

    • I agreed class size matter but to an extent. why are majority of the NYC schools have smaller class size than 321 but performed much worst?
      At the end how can one fault the parents that wanted good education for their children which they had planed for and now trying to fight for? Wished we can have this kind of arrugment at every NYC school then our public school system would be a lot better.

  • Have been trying to reply to expert_ but the replies keep vanishing. Trying once more, hope it is helpful:
    I think test scores can be misleading, and the DOE school grades are pretty useless. If you’re looking in D15, scrolling through archived Park Slope Parents discussions can give some insight if you have the time, but also look at nycschoolhelp.com – Joyce Szuflita’s site. Before you pay her for a consult (she’s quite helpful), decide on your priorities – small classes or lots of enrichments; progressive vs traditional; kids w/different abilities and backgrounds vs homogenous high-test-scorers, etc. Some schools are improving rapidly but may still have a few iffy teachers from an earlier administration. None of these fine D15 schools have it all.

  • Have been trying to reply to expert_ but the replies keep vanishing. Trying once more, hope it is helpful:
    I think test scores can be misleading, and the DOE school grades are pretty useless. If you’re looking in D15, scrolling through archived Park Slope Parents discussions can give some insight if you have the time, but also look at nycschoolhelp.com – Joyce Szuflita’s site. Before you pay her for a consult (she’s quite helpful), decide on your priorities – small classes or lots of enrichments; progressive vs traditional; kids w/different abilities and backgrounds vs homogenous high-test-scorers, etc. Some schools are improving rapidly but may still have a few iffy teachers from an earlier administration. None of these fine D15 schools have it all.

  • You’re a model of enlightened parenting, Heather. The doorstep of your child’s bedroom never darkened by ponies and unicorns, and you don’t need no stinkin’ recycling. So bold you let yoga into your vocabulary, yet so prole that you pronounce it with contempt. U kewl. Awesome sauce on your table at every meal.

  • No, I’d say it serves quite well, dandelion. Did you not get a slot at Arts & Letters or something? Was that what caused your original meltdown? We’re really happy in district 13. We had opportunities to leave it and chose not to. I have no idea what your issue with it is or was and I don’t really care.

    Have a nice time in Park Slope? I’m happy for your family? It’s probably good we’re not on the same PTA?

    Xo,

    H

  • No, I’d say it serves quite well, dandelion. Did you not get a slot at Arts & Letters or something? Was that what caused your original meltdown? We’re really happy in district 13. We had opportunities to leave it and chose not to. I have no idea what your issue with it is or was and I don’t really care.

    Have a nice time in Park Slope? I’m happy for your family? It’s probably good we’re not on the same PTA?

    Xo,

    H

  • Heather, dear, your smug 30-something is showing. Apparently you’re neither old nor wise enough to recognize your part in turning your neighborhood into the racial and cultural vacuum you pretend to abhor. So here’s two history lessons: 1) it’s inevitable that you’ll become your mother, and 2) Park Slope was a diverse, affordable, working class, neglected, divided, even redlined neighborhood as little as 30 years ago. “Way back when” the diversity, affordability and extended families kept a younger generation here, and attracted newcomers. Gradually, and in the last decade, rapidly, the neighborhood changed. Now your very presence–yes, you, of all people–is helping convert your current neighborhood and district into something that will soon resemble modern-day PS. But when that happens, I’m confident we’ll find you boasting about being in the vanguard of people who weren’t ascared to school your child back in the day, when “diversity” still roamed the brownstone belt. Why, a few years down the road we’ll probably even find you riding a unicorn, waving a multi-culti flag.

  • Heather, dear, your smug 30-something is showing. Apparently you’re neither old nor wise enough to recognize your part in turning your neighborhood into the racial and cultural vacuum you pretend to abhor. So here’s two history lessons: 1) it’s inevitable that you’ll become your mother, and 2) Park Slope was a diverse, affordable, working class, neglected, divided, even redlined neighborhood as little as 30 years ago. “Way back when” the diversity, affordability and extended families kept a younger generation here, and attracted newcomers. Gradually, and in the last decade, rapidly, the neighborhood changed. Now your very presence–yes, you, of all people–is helping convert your current neighborhood and district into something that will soon resemble modern-day PS. But when that happens, I’m confident we’ll find you boasting about being in the vanguard of people who weren’t ascared to school your child back in the day, when “diversity” still roamed the brownstone belt. Why, a few years down the road we’ll probably even find you riding a unicorn, waving a multi-culti flag.

  • If you actually knew me, cup, or even read what I’ve said, you’d realize many falsehoods in your assumptions, cup. However, I am flattered that you think I am young, blonde and asian, so I’ll let it slide.

  • If you actually knew me, cup, or even read what I’ve said, you’d realize many falsehoods in your assumptions, cup. However, I am flattered that you think I am young, blonde and asian, so I’ll let it slide.

  • So you’re acting your shoe size. Thanks for clearing that up. And your hairdresser hasn’t returned your calls?

  • Sorry, I’m late responding.
    Thanks to those that replied to my question.
    Got it, look at test scores, class size, program, pta. Talk to other parents in nabe.

    We still have 2 years before sending the ‘brat’ off to pre-k. But we’re looking to move (looking in several nabes) and the school will be a big factor. Unless, we find something great in the ghetto and we can use our friends address in Brooklyn Heights.
    [^^^^^^^ Sarcasm]