House of the Day: 562 Henry Street


Here’s an 1850s Carroll Gardens Italianate you don’t have to renovate or restore; it’s already been done by the broker-owner, with all the bells and whistles. The 20-foot-wide brick townhouse is set up as an owner’s triplex over a garden rental, both with separate entrances. The top three floors have brand-new electric, plumbing, central air, bathrooms, kitchen, floors, Wolf, Miele and Sub-Zero appliances, Arclinea cabinets and Calacatta marble counters. The original staircase and the front exterior have been restored. Out back is a steel and ipe wood deck. While the house is merely a block from the BQE, we know from personal experience you can’t hear it from that distance. The listing doesn’t specify whether the house will be delivered vacant. For $3,600,000, how do you like it?
562 Henry Street [Corcoran] GMAP P*Shark

23 Comment

  • “Here’s an 1850s Carroll Gardens Italianate you don’t have to renovate or restore”, except to change the access to the bathrooms so they’re not only accessible from bedrooms.

    WTF!?!?!?!!?
    Why can’t people understand basic concepts of space planning?

  • And the door to the parlor floor powder room should have been from the hallway. Who wants to be sitting at the dining table and the door oopens and you see the toilet.

  • And the door to the parlor floor powder room should have been from the hallway. Who wants to be sitting at the dining table and the door oopens and you see the toilet.

  • uuuuuuggggghhhhh, and the laundry area in the bedroom.

    Townhouse renovators, please, for the love of an efficient layout, use the core (the center of your houses), the windowless area, for bathrooms, walk-in closets, laundry rooms.

  • uuuuuuggggghhhhh, and the laundry area in the bedroom.

    Townhouse renovators, please, for the love of an efficient layout, use the core (the center of your houses), the windowless area, for bathrooms, walk-in closets, laundry rooms.

  • I’m rich (before transaction costs).
    Seriously, although this is a beautiful apartment, even if it sells at ask, how much profit will the flipper keep?

  • I have to 2nd expert text- horribly clumsy layout decisions. Numbingly mindless. Can’t imagine the thought process behind it. Single or couple making decisions? But it was just renovated, so reno’d w/ intention to sell? Placement of closets, baths, door openings- what were they thinking?

  • I have to 2nd expert text- horribly clumsy layout decisions. Numbingly mindless. Can’t imagine the thought process behind it. Single or couple making decisions? But it was just renovated, so reno’d w/ intention to sell? Placement of closets, baths, door openings- what were they thinking?

  • This looks like a pretty nice renovation from the pictures , high end . You also get a great school district location .

  • This house was for sale in the Brownstoner Marketplace less than 2 years ago for $1.795mil. Since that time, the owners put maybe 250K more into it. They will come out way ahead no matter how this works out.

  • Pmags- No your renovation doesn’t look pretty nice from the pics. Why the tumor of a cabinet above the kitchen window? Whose idea was that? “Saving” SOME of the molding, while leaving the remaining to become runway lines on the ceiling, that doesn’t look high end to me. Looks fast and cheap. High end would entail paying the bucks to get an artisan to make matching moulding encircle newly sized room ceiling.

  • Totally agree on placement of door on parlor floor bath. Not only would I prefer it opening to the hall rather than to the dining room, I hate the the look of the hall ending at that blank wall (and no, putting an entry table and mirror there wouldn’t help much.) A door to the bath in the hallway would look much better, but not that flat, modern door with modern handle, but a period-looking door.

    I think the 2 rooms shown with couches are crying out for fireplaces, working or not – those walls just look naked. Guess one could find salvage ones, dig a big into the wall, and add them.

    Like the kitchen and deck, though I’d put more planters to hide the not so lovely (but necessary) deck side walls. Like that they resisted the common urge to put counter seating opposite the sink wall, which clutters up the dining area and reduces the spaces necessary for a dining table, in houses like this one that aren’t wide enough to comfortably accomodate both counter seating and table and chairs.

    Second floor bath placement works if you wanted a full-floor master suite. If you don’t, and want to use the two rooms there for separate purposes, then I agree, there would be much more flexibility if the bath opened to the hall. But then, unlike most, I’m not a huge fan of en suite baths, while many consider them necessary.

    Top floor – I’d have put the bathroom so it went all the way to the window. I like having a window in the bath. Much prefer them with windows than in the windowless central area of the brownstone. Closets I agree should be in the windowless central areas. While natural light is nice in a dressing room, if the closets don’t have doors, as in some closets I see in old houses with closets with windows, I think wow, I really need to block that sunlight completely so it doesn’t fade my clothing. Ideal is a dressing room with natural light, perhaps from a skylight, the room wide enough to have doors on the closets to prevent fading of clothing.

  • Yes, the flat “luan” doors (even if they are higher end and solid core) look out of place. OK for a modern loft like space but not this.

  • And, though I like the kitchen layout, I’d much prefer a full-length window to look out of when cooking, and would not have shortened that window to put a cabinet over the stove – that’s not the best place for a cabinet anyway.

  • this layout is pretty f’in terrible.

  • A perfect example of the Kitchen Bermuda Triangle at work.

  • the layout looks like a traditional layout just tweaked. They stuck the powder room on the parlor floor with a strange door placement but these are where the walls are in most traditional townhouses.Bathrooms at the stop of the stairs. I thought you guys were all preservationists.

  • It throws the whole listing into question when the owner misrepresents a key fact (that is easy to verify through public records). The house is 40 deep, not 45 (which makes it approximately 3000 square feet, not 3600). Based on very recent comps, this house should sell for $2.7mm (which is $1mm more than it might have sold for a year ago). Also, I am an architect, and, unfortunately, this is a low end renovation. It’s too bad.

  • I own a small townhouse nearby. I walked through this townhouse recently and the comments all of you have made are right. This house has quite a bad layout. And, the layout can not be changed without some very major work and reconstruction. Also, this part of Henry Street is a thoroughfare and probably not very safe for children. Lots of traffic exits 278 en route to Atlantic … right in front of this house. Agree with others on the low end renovations. I would guess $2.8 for this house based on what others are selling for in the neighborhood.

  • i wholeheartedly agree about the bathrooms. Poster child for being penny wise and pound foolish hiring a PE and not an architect. I’m sure there were some valid cost reasons for cutting these corners, but its just way to critical for this a$king price. Bit of a shame considering all the other work put into the house.

    I disagree about some of the comments on modern changes, most of which i really like. Otherwise central air is HUGE to me, and owners unit overall seems great. Deck, backyard, lots of great things here, this buyer isn’t going to care about the molding or the door, the place seems like it feels good (from pics). Not sure if i love the kitchen, but it will have to be seen to give a firm opinion.

    Unfortunately, someone still has to live here, and it can’t really be a family – well, not one with $3.6 million. I don’t think this closes over $3.0 – and in addition to that there will need to be some $$ in the deal for changing the bathrooms. $3.6 million living has *some” standards as to daily living conditions.

    Also, i wouldn’t mind living across from lucali. yum.