Brooklyn Also out of Gas


We are receiving reports that stations in Brooklyn are out of gas. “We drove from Park Slope to Coney Island last night and passed 20 stations that were all out of gas. My colleague said she drove Pro Heights to Greenpoint in the middle of the night and could not get any then either,” emailed a reader. Gas stations throughout Crown Heights and along Bushwick Avenue near the Jackie Robinson are out. People with generators and cars have drained them, and apparently they have not received new deliveries, although roads into Brooklyn are open. Has anyone found a gas station open in Brooklyn with gas? Update: A reader found a station on Coney Island that still has some gas, above. It’s hard to tell, but the cars in the right-hand lane and past the station, beyond, are waiting in line for gas.

20 Comment

  • Theres a Getty at 3902 Ave U in Marine Park with gas but the line is 3 or 4 blocks long. You could waste a lot of gas just waiting.

  • The problem with gasoline deliveries is not the roads into Brooklyn, it is disruptions to regional refining and fuel distribution. New York gets most of its gasoline via regional refineries (mainly New Jersey and Philadelphia area), via oil product pipelines from the US Gulf Coast, and via imports in New York Harbor. Philly refiners are back online, but about 25% of Northeast refining capacity is in and around Linden, New Jersey, and the refiners there (Phillips 66 and Hess) are either awaiting the restoration of power or suffered flood damage. Almost one-third of gasoline and diesel supplies to the US Northeast come via the Colonial Pipeline from the US Gulf Coast, which has a spur that terminates at an oil hub in Linden. Almost all the oil terminals there are without power or suffered flood damage, so while Colonial will be able to resume deliveries from Friday (on back-up generators), their customers are not yet able to take the fuel. The storage tank operators may have fuel in their terminals, but they can only pump it onto trucks if they have back-up power generators and if seawater corrosion did not impact electrical systems and control panels. No one there was prepared for 14 foot storm surge. It is going to take time for fuel distribution networks to return to normal. The EPA has just issued temporary waivers allowing the use of conventional gasoline (as opposed to reformulated gasoline), as well as waivers to allow higher-sulfur content diesel. These easier fuel specifications are intended to bring flexibility into the refining system until everything goes back to normal. This means fuel deliveries to the retail stations can be sporadic. Nice biking weather today!

    • Great to have someone here who knows what he’s talking about.

      Are there any other options, like trucking the fuel in from Oklahoma or some place like that?

      • R-squared, there are a few options, but it won’t be quick. First, there is plenty of fuel sitting in cargoes offshore that have not been able to unload into New York Harbor because the Coast Guard will not let any vessels into the Arthur Kill waterway due to a diesel spill caused by the storm. As of Thursday, barges will be allowed to unload at operational facilities in the Upper Bay, North River (Hudson) and East River; Arthur Kill is still off limits, but at least some ports are reopening to let barges bring the fuel in (though large tankers can’t come in yet). Second, Colonial on Friday will start limited deliveries to those tanks able to take them in Linden. A lot of terminal operators there are still shut, but one of them, NuStar Energy, got some back-up generators in place today and should be reopening its truck bays on Friday. Third, there are some terminals open in the Bronx, Brooklyn, Connecticut, and further afield in Delaware, Philadelphia, Maryland and Virginia. Colonial can make some deliveries downline (in Maryland and Virginia), and those oil products can be trucked up here. New York City is not the only area short of fuel, so we don’t necessarily get first call. There are also limitations on available tanker trucks. Fourth, there are cases where there is gasoline available in storage, but it can’t be pumped out due to electricity outages. As power is restored and back-up generators are brought in, this can help at a number of retail stations. All told, some deliveries should start to flow on Friday, but it will probably take a week to get to anything approaching normal. It doesn’t help when you have panicked drivers running around trying to hoard up on fuel. The key thing to watch in the next couple of days is whether the Coast Guard will allow vessels into the Arthur Kill, and to watch how quickly terminal operators in Linden can deal with flooding and power. Also, the quicker more subway lines can reopen, the less demand for gasoline there will be from people who usually take mass transit. I’m sticking to my bicycle.

      • R-squared, there are a few options, but it won’t be quick. First, there is plenty of fuel sitting in cargoes offshore that have not been able to unload into New York Harbor because the Coast Guard will not let any vessels into the Arthur Kill waterway due to a diesel spill caused by the storm. As of Thursday, barges will be allowed to unload at operational facilities in the Upper Bay, North River (Hudson) and East River; Arthur Kill is still off limits, but at least some ports are reopening to let barges bring the fuel in (though large tankers can’t come in yet). Second, Colonial on Friday will start limited deliveries to those tanks able to take them in Linden. A lot of terminal operators there are still shut, but one of them, NuStar Energy, got some back-up generators in place today and should be reopening its truck bays on Friday. Third, there are some terminals open in the Bronx, Brooklyn, Connecticut, and further afield in Delaware, Philadelphia, Maryland and Virginia. Colonial can make some deliveries downline (in Maryland and Virginia), and those oil products can be trucked up here. New York City is not the only area short of fuel, so we don’t necessarily get first call. There are also limitations on available tanker trucks. Fourth, there are cases where there is gasoline available in storage, but it can’t be pumped out due to electricity outages. As power is restored and back-up generators are brought in, this can help at a number of retail stations. All told, some deliveries should start to flow on Friday, but it will probably take a week to get to anything approaching normal. It doesn’t help when you have panicked drivers running around trying to hoard up on fuel. The key thing to watch in the next couple of days is whether the Coast Guard will allow vessels into the Arthur Kill, and to watch how quickly terminal operators in Linden can deal with flooding and power. Also, the quicker more subway lines can reopen, the less demand for gasoline there will be from people who usually take mass transit. I’m sticking to my bicycle.

  • Reads like a taste of Coming Attractions! – Coming soon to a theater near you(only it’s real life) – Climate Change!

  • A friend driving north out of Brooklyn to the Hudson Valley just texted that the first station with gas he encountered is the first rest stop on the New York State Thruway, in Sloatsburg. As you might imagine, there’s a long line.

  • “Reads like a taste of Coming Attractions! – Coming soon to a theater near you(only it’s real life) – Climate Change!”

    Coming soon? !? More like “Now Playing: Climate Change”. What do think is responsible for us getting a “100 year storm” every year now? Last summer was the most significant melting of the polar ice cap, and we didn’t even have a winter last year. The increase in moisture and higher temps caused by global warming are what explain the severity of Irene and Sandy in back to back years. Coincidence? Maybe if it was only one storm, but two severe storms in back-to-back years is a trend.

  • The Hess on 4th ave at 31st street. Just came from there. It’s a zoo but they have gas.

  • I filled up at the Hess station at the corner of Cypress Ave and Cooper. Plenty of gas no waiting. I know this is not technically in BK, its in Queens, but it is right off the Jackie Robinson at the Cypress Ave. exit.

  • I filled up at the Hess station at the corner of Cypress Ave and Cooper. Plenty of gas no waiting. I know this is not technically in BK, its in Queens, but it is right off the Jackie Robinson at the Cypress Ave. exit.

  • The roads are barely dry and the climate change nutters are already out turning this into politics. D.cks.

  • The roads are barely dry and the climate change nutters are already out turning this into politics. D.cks.

  • Bkresident – I’m with you in my thinking, and totally stand corrected in my choice of words…definitely Now Playing…

    Petunia – I remember those old Palmolive commercials, and like your reference…would make a good billboard, a slogan for a group trying to make some policy changes happen.

  • “The roads are barely dry and the climate change nutters are already out turning this into politics. D.cks.”

    Really Shankly? Your comment was the first that referred to politics, so who is the D.ck? Those speaking about climate change weren’t pushing politics but science. Keep putting your head in the sand.

  • The gas station on Atlantic & Henry St is open. I waited from 9:30 – 11:45. It was pretty orderly except for the last 30 mins when the cops let several undercover vehicles cut the line (like 30 or so) and as a result some drivers coming from their direction were also able to cut the line. Overall, though, it was a good experience. The line started on Columbia at 9:30. Not sure how far back it is now. Oh, and they were giving full tanks and taking credit cards. Good luck!

  • Still looking was in line for over to hours and when I was a car in front of me the cop said an hour ago they started restricting nurses from getting gas from the first responders line only FDNY. I told the sergeant I am a visiting nurse that must give people injections and change their bandages in the morning and she said she don’t care it’s strict now. So how are visiting nurses first resoomders and can’t provide care to people in need. I suggested she have an officer walk around the block and tell people in line and she just looked at me. What happened to working together for the greater good? So sad