5th Ave Reno: Too Much Glass, You Think?

Hubby and I are now in the last stages of the design development phase with our architects Len and Quncie. As many of you know this phase is all about the dreams, the wish list, and the delusions of grandeur: bigger, brighter, better!

But after the delusions wear off, you begin to realize that perhaps, just maybe, you dreamed a bit too big! The existing space is 1,300 square feet. We need more space so we decided to build up, way up.  The 22-foot glass wall is beautiful, but I am starting to believe that the glass may overwhelm the existing space. “Maybe if we removed the glass railing you won’t feel as if there is glass everywhere,” Hubby suggests.

So Quncie shows us different perspectives of a partial glass railing, a partial metal railing, a full sheetrock railing and a railing that includes, glass, metal and sheetrock.

 


We will let you know what we decide.

Also, the constructions plans are done and we are ready to bid the job. We have done our research and have narrowed our selection to four potential contractors. I’m so ready and extremely excited to begin this reno journey. 

Next week we meet the contractors! Please stay tuned…

18 Comment

  • Much better without all the glass. I think it helps to define individual spaces within the structure better. I’m not sure if you answered my earlier question. How do you plan to deal with privacy issues on the back of the house with that floor to room glass wall? Electronic retractable blinds/shades? Glass with a filler that goes opaque when an electronic charge is applied to it? All that glass is appealing if you like a lot of light but trust me, after a while you are going to feel like you are putting on a show for your neighbors with a view. Plus, and this is kind of important, especially if you have kids or plan on having kids, all that light flooding in at the crack of dawn is going to cause everyone to wake up early every day. Picture your 2 year old waking up at 5:30 in the summer when you want to sleep to 7 or 8. Just something to think about.

  • hauteartist

    I hate the word “Hubby” that is all.

  • hauteartist

    I hate the word “Hubby” that is all.

  • i like it but why not add another complete floor over the living room? that would give you a lot more space no?

  • fractalogical

    Have you submitted these plans to the DOB yet? Getting work like this approved could take quite a while. I suspect the examiner will require you to add sprinklers throughout as well.

  • fractalogical

    Have you submitted these plans to the DOB yet? Getting work like this approved could take quite a while. I suspect the examiner will require you to add sprinklers throughout as well.

    • Is this an addition to a house? Brick or frame? We had to cut way back on our plans but the design part was really fun. Some of the comments are spot on, I find, as we are now in the construction/hemmorhaging money phase of our project. But I look forward to seeing this project evolve. I agree all that glass is going to cost a fortune, both upfront and in heating/cooling costs, but it’s sure pretty to look at right now!

  • Silly to have floating stairs but then fill in the handrail?

    Also, those stairs look awfully steep.

  • we got some many dark spaces and stone in bklyn, glass is good !

  • we got some many dark spaces and stone in bklyn, glass is good !

  • There are three practical problems with this much glass:

    1) It will be extremely energy inefficient. Doesn’t matter if you use the best stuff there is, compared to a similar structure with a solid wall you’re heating costs will be much higher.

    2) Unless you and your family are exhibitionists, you will probably feel uncomfortable with the lack of privacy.

    3) This much glass tends to convey a feeling of unease. It seems counter-intuitive, but generally humans prefer a sense of enclosure for their shelter.

    Beyond the overabundance of glass though, I really like your design. The stairs and balcony convey a wonderful sense of depth, and the bookshelf up top is awesome.

  • There are three practical problems with this much glass:

    1) It will be extremely energy inefficient. Doesn’t matter if you use the best stuff there is, compared to a similar structure with a solid wall you’re heating costs will be much higher.

    2) Unless you and your family are exhibitionists, you will probably feel uncomfortable with the lack of privacy.

    3) This much glass tends to convey a feeling of unease. It seems counter-intuitive, but generally humans prefer a sense of enclosure for their shelter.

    Beyond the overabundance of glass though, I really like your design. The stairs and balcony convey a wonderful sense of depth, and the bookshelf up top is awesome.

  • architect66

    Yes, the glass wall will turn your home into an energy hog. Even if you spec a super high performance glass curtainwall, your chances of finding a home renovation contractor who can work with it at a reasonable cost in Brooklyn are like – nil. You should definitely ask your potential contractors if they’ve ever done anything comparable to a 22′ high glass curtain wall. Anyway, if you are made of money or absolutely must have it, do yourself a favor and invest in a good shading system. Get one that integrates with the rest of the architecture and can be controlled by light sensors. Lutron makes one and there are others as well.

  • Have you considered how you will feel when the glass railing has fingerprints all over the top edge? In the design stage, it’s easy to get lost in the idea of the design in it’s pristine form. Imagine what it will look like smudged and if that doesn’t bother you, then go for it. I’d be walking around with a bottle of Windex!

  • Can the homeowner weigh in on some of the questions posed in the comments?

  • Can the homeowner weigh in on some of the questions posed in the comments?

  • Your poor architect! Your plans are done and now you have second thoughts about the design and decide to ask a bunch of strangers what they think? Oh well, I do agree with “hubby” that the glass railing is too much. And I agree with others that this is a very expensive design and there is too much glass, way more volume than you need.

  • Your poor architect! Your plans are done and now you have second thoughts about the design and decide to ask a bunch of strangers what they think? Oh well, I do agree with “hubby” that the glass railing is too much. And I agree with others that this is a very expensive design and there is too much glass, way more volume than you need.