So Much for Affordable Parking at Barclays


Now we know what free market rates are going to be like for parking on nights when Barclays is hosting sporting events or concerts. A tipster just sent in this photo of new signage advertising a flat parking fee of $30. At that rate, you can bet drivers are going to spend time combing the surrounding neighborhoods for free street parking. And this is all the way down on Grand and Atlantic. The arena’s still a good 15-minute walk from here!

32 Comment

  • Or… gasp… they might actually use public transportation and one of the 9 subway lines running through Atlantic/Flatbush, one of a dozen bus lines or the LIRR.

  • We want expensive parking here. If it’s cheap, drivers will flood the neighborhood. (Some will anyway in the search for free on-street parking, but most will know it’s difficult.)

    I HIGHLY suggest Brownstoner read Donald Shoup if it wants to better understand parking economics.

  • I actually think 30 is cheap — which as has been pointed out, is more trouble than expensive parking

  • I actually think 30 is cheap — which as has been pointed out, is more trouble than expensive parking

  • USGrant

    There is going to be a lot of sharks circling the neighborhoods near (and parts beyond) this new arena. I would circle the blocks, if I were going to take a chance on saving $45-$50 on parking. I would at least drive around to see what I could find – even if I knew I would be paying the going rate eventually. You never know when you’ll get lucky. (So, I guess everyone will end up doing this.)

  • USGrant

    There is going to be a lot of sharks circling the neighborhoods near (and parts beyond) this new arena. I would circle the blocks, if I were going to take a chance on saving $45-$50 on parking. I would at least drive around to see what I could find – even if I knew I would be paying the going rate eventually. You never know when you’ll get lucky. (So, I guess everyone will end up doing this.)

    • i think you’re spot on with what arena-goers will intend to do. as a practical matter, there isn’t going to be any parking (or any real “circling”) because any available parking will be taken up on the morning of event days, by ticketholders who will park and then commute to their jobs and back, and/or spend the day in the ‘hood drinking their free parking’s worth of cheap beer. maybe some of those would-be “circlers” will eventually figure it out and take the train or shuttle or whatever, but with the diversity of programming there are going to be at least 10% of ticketholders each time who are new to the arena don’t figure this out ahead of time.

      gonna be awesome for street vendors, and suck for everyone else.

  • we need parking permits in neighborhoods within a 10 minute drive of the arena!

  • I think that the vast majority of people will take mass transit anyway, either the subways, buses or LIRR. If I go to events at MSG in Manhattan I always take the subway; I would never drive and have to deal with traffic and exorbitant parking fees.

    Yes, even people who can afford to pay for the parking will probably take the subway to save the headache of dealing with traffic, and if they drive the first time, they probably won’t the next time.

    I can also see people taking cabs or car services and having them drop off a block or two away (like as soon as they get mired in traffic). That’s what I would do if I where not near convenient public transit.

  • As said, the more expensive the better

  • East New York

    Don’t like that price or the threat of traffic? Don’t drive.

    The point is there are options.

  • To think, I use to envy people that could afford to buy a house down there. NO MORE!

  • faithful

    I’m going to a concert @ Barclays next month. I will definitely take the B65. I think public transportation is the way to go!!!

  • There will still be many people, even NYers, whose idea of a great night out on the town does NOT include the subway or MTA bus. Personally, if I ever intended to set foot into that monstrosity of an arena, and since I don’t drive, I would take a car service. That, unfortunately, leaves the problem of actually getting a car service to pick one up when the event is over. For that reason, I think there will still be many people who will drive their cars to the arena. I pity the homeowners around there. Luckily, there will never be any programming that will bring me to the arena. I wish Bruce Ratner REALLY lousy business.

  • Vast majority of people will take subway or mass transit, some people will take cabs and car service and even fewer will take car.
    Almost anyone going to an event at an arena comes with one or more people (who goes alone to a game, concert, etc) .
    There will be minimal impact from “circling”

  • minard

    cheap compared to Giants Stadium (Metlife Arena).

  • minard

    cheap compared to Giants Stadium (Metlife Arena).

  • It’s fine if they want to charge $0, $50, or $100. And it’s fine if people want to park their cars on the street in the surrounding neighborhoods. It’s New York City and parking is difficult – it was before the Barclays Center and it will be after the Barclays Center and the difference will be negligible. If you live in Brooklyn and you have a problem because parking is difficult, get rid of your car. The superiority complex of residents int he area amazes. Barclays is not even built and it is already to find parking in places like Park Slope and Fort Green, and the large minority of license plates on cars parked on the streets are out of state anyway.

  • 11 subway lines + LIRR + expensive parking = a high insentive to avoid driving, read as: a good thing! This is actually smart planning to let market forces set the parking rates, which should be high, rather than subsidize parking spots like they did at Yankee stadium which results in millions of tax payers dollars underwriting cemented urban dead space that tax payers now need to pay to tear down! density is the new green living, baby.

    when did our civic pact come with an inalienable right to free automobile parking? I say the city should auction off every curb-side parking spot in the city for $1,000/year and use that money to make the subways and buses free to everyone. that would be far more egalitarian…since everyone has access to the subway/buses, and only those who can afford cars have access to parking spots. oh, and the stipulation the MTA will have to abide by to sink their teeth into all this money is that they will move from a state to city entity. Let’s do this.

    • Just want to inject a bit of reality into this discussion. Both mass transit and parking are subsidized by the state. When you look at farebox recovery ratios (the amount of operating expenses covered by fares paid), there is not one system (NYC subway/bus, LIRR, SI rail, MetroNorth) that generates more than 55% of their revenues from ridership. Wikipedia provides the following information on recovery ratios:

      LIRR: 26.6%
      Subway/bus: 55.5%
      Metro North: 36.2%
      SI rail: 15.2%

      So, before we start talking about fairness, lets accept the proposition that there are good reasons to encourage both mass transit and car ownership in the city. Also, “everyone”” does not have subway/bus access. There are huge swaths of Brooklyn, the Bronx and Queens that have only limited MTA access and must rely on private cars, dollar vans, private bus systems, and car services for mobility. And what happens to people who can’t access public transportation due to physical disabilities?

      Central Brooklyn is blessed with a wonderful amount of mass transit. But this is the exception rather than the rule in Brooklyn. Many neighborhoods have access to only one or no train lines. Before we talk about making NYC car free we should be looking at building subways that run to underserved neighborhoods, strengthening our ancient system against flooding that may come from climate change, and providing additional mass transit alternatives that are suited to our particular climate and weather. As for Ratner’s Folly, I predict it will be very much like MSG. People that live on a train line that runs there will take public transit so long as the commute is less than 45-60 minutes. Everyone else will drive because no one wants the hassle of an hour + commute at midnight after leaving a game, show or concert

  • minard

    There are the folks who like to drive and the folks who do not like to drive. They really cannot figure each other out at all. The greater hate comes from the non-drivers i think but maybe that’s because the drivers are too busy looking for a place to park to blog.

  • No one drive to Madison Square Garden, even though it is undoubtedly the case that:

    1. More people are coming in from out of town
    2. There is far more parking around MSG (tons of garages)

    Why on earth will people decide to drive to Barclays?

  • minard

    LOL!
    A lot of people drive to Madison Square Garden.
    Are you kidding me? Who do you think fills up all those garages in the vicinity? New Yorkers are so out of touch with their fellow Americans. It’s really comical. Like my friends from the burbs are going to take a bus or a train in to see the Knicks or the Rangers. LOL!

  • minard

    LOL!
    A lot of people drive to Madison Square Garden.
    Are you kidding me? Who do you think fills up all those garages in the vicinity? New Yorkers are so out of touch with their fellow Americans. It’s really comical. Like my friends from the burbs are going to take a bus or a train in to see the Knicks or the Rangers. LOL!

  • Street parking should be even more expensive to prevent people from circling around. If you live in NYC you should be taking transit, not driving.

  • Street parking should be even more expensive to prevent people from circling around. If you live in NYC you should be taking transit, not driving.

  • Even though I do not know how to drive, there are still times when a car in the city is necessary: heavy duty shopping, taking older or very young people places, and picking up building supplies are three reasons that come to mind. Also, there are lots of trips that are highly inconvenient and time-consuming by public transportation. To get from Crown Hts (where I live) to almost anywhere in Queens, for example is a horror without a car.

  • Affordable parking? Is that a joke? We should subsidize driving in downtown Brooklyn? Ate you insane?

  • Good points, lcarnett. Of course, leaving the arena late at night will probably entail much longer commutes since, by that hour, trains are running quite infrequently. Attendees could easily be standing in a station for a half hour before any train arrives. If they need to transfer to another line, the aubway/bus trip could easily end up taking a couple of hours. That’s not even considering the MTA’s FasTrack repair program where some lines are not running after 10PM four nights in a row.

    People who think everyone can and must use commute only by public transportation/bikes/walking are not being realistic. I doubt that that will be possible here even if I lived another two lifetimes.