BREAKING: Major Building Collapse on Carlton Avenue


There’s been a major building collapse at the construction project 231 Carlton Avenue, aka the Carlton Mews Townhouses. Based on what we gathered on site, excessive weight caused the roof to collapse which in turn knocked out the lower floors as well. The side walls and facade were still standing. We were also told that two construction workers came out of the collapse and NY1 currently is reporting that the two workers pulled out are in critical condition. Carlton and Dekalb Avenue are shut down and filled with rescue workers. Another tipster said this of the buildings: “Note also how warped the roof frame (of aluminum) is to the left of the one that gave; they probably overloaded the one on the right.” UPDATE: One worker now reported dead. Also, more photos on Gothamist.




12 Comment

  • It’s weird how all the other media are reporting that the collapsed building was at 214 Carlton. (At that building, it looks like the DOB disapproved some submitted work plans only a couple of weeks ago.)

  • My friend who was walking by there today reported seeing several people being removed unconscious from the building and cadaver dogs sniffing around. Crazy and tragic.

  • The NY Times has the most accurate coverage. At least they got the address right and that the collapse happened in a new building under construction not a brownstone.
    A terrible accident. It will probably make it even harder to pry permits out of the DOB for the foreseeable future.

  • I hope that there is some official response to this– and if DOB tightens the rules for permits, that may be necessary. I mean, I’ll complain as much as the next person when my work gets stalled, but there is no excuse for a person to die on a job site. Somebody must have done something horribly wrong, and I’d be glad to see our representatives work to ensure that future development is safe for the people who live & work in these buildings.

    • @from. I hear you but let’s see what the cause is, before “blaming someone” It was a bit unusual for a “new project” to have a collapse but we did have some crazy weather on Sat.

      • I’m all for gathering the facts and not rushing to blame. But I saw the quantity of cement that was stacked on the part of the building that *didn’t* collapse, so I can only assume that the part that did collapse was weighted at least as heavily– and I’m not saying that I know what happened, just that I hope that the investigation into it is serious & consequential.

        After all, it is the responsibility of any workplace to ensure that people there are safe under prevailing conditions. (Also imho- anyone working in NYC should prepare for the possibility of a little bit of crazy weather, since we seem to get it with some regularity.)

      • I’m all for gathering the facts and not rushing to blame. But I saw the quantity of cement that was stacked on the part of the building that *didn’t* collapse, so I can only assume that the part that did collapse was weighted at least as heavily– and I’m not saying that I know what happened, just that I hope that the investigation into it is serious & consequential.

        After all, it is the responsibility of any workplace to ensure that people there are safe under prevailing conditions. (Also imho- anyone working in NYC should prepare for the possibility of a little bit of crazy weather, since we seem to get it with some regularity.)

    • @from. I hear you but let’s see what the cause is, before “blaming someone” It was a bit unusual for a “new project” to have a collapse but we did have some crazy weather on Sat.

  • I hope that there is some official response to this– and if DOB tightens the rules for permits, that may be necessary. I mean, I’ll complain as much as the next person when my work gets stalled, but there is no excuse for a person to die on a job site. Somebody must have done something horribly wrong, and I’d be glad to see our representatives work to ensure that future development is safe for the people who live & work in these buildings.

  • I don’t know what happened but they may have overloaded the unfinished decking on the third or fourth floor.
    Construction is inherently dangerous. Always has been.

  • It’s true that construction will always be dangerous, but also that safer construction will always cost a little more.