House of the Day: 848 Carroll Street


Wow, this new limestone-and-brick townhouse listing at 848 Carroll Street in Park Slope is pretty impressive! Serious scale and historic detail all with a comprehensive modern tune-up at some point. The price, not surprisingly, ain’t low: $3,575,000. But when you consider that that’s about what the new townhouses on State Street will be priced at it doesn’t seem so bad given the historic power this place is packing.
848 Carroll Street [Halstead] GMAP P*Shark

15 Comment

  • While I agree that this is a gorgeous home, I don’t see how the outrageously priced new townhouses over on State Street should be used as a benchmark for pricing this. I want to avoid a snarky tone, but can someone explain to me what is happening in the current Brooklyn real estate market? By most economic indicators, we’re still in a deep recession, even in NYC. Where are buyers, and renters, for that matter, getting the cash to enter into and remain in this market?? I don’t get it. If my memory serves me correctly, the first set of townhouses on State Street by Time Equities Inc. sold six or seven years ago for $2.1-$2.5 million, and I thought that was outlandish then, having toured them and found the construction and finishes substandard. But that was at the height of a boom/bubble market. Now they want to price new ones at $1 million above the original prices. How is this justified? I was also shocked by the recent $3 million listing for a brownstone on Lafayette Ave, as if this is the new normal. I am a middle class creative/social worker type who has sadly become priced out of the neighborhood. Please explain what’s going on.

    • I think only one of the 14 townhouses sold at around $2.1. The remainders sold for between $2.5 and 2.75M.

      But yes, they are not a benchmark in any way for this house — to a certain extent those modern townhouses are sui generis,as they sell for over a $1 million more than traditional townhouses on State Street.

      As for the crazy high prices, look at Manhattan — 3 to 4 bedrooms apartments are out of reach of many or even most upper class professional types. Combine that with the massive bourgie-ification of Carroll Gardens, Boerum Hill etc., and you get very high prices.

    • I think only one of the 14 townhouses sold at around $2.1. The remainders sold for between $2.5 and 2.75M.

      But yes, they are not a benchmark in any way for this house — to a certain extent those modern townhouses are sui generis,as they sell for over a $1 million more than traditional townhouses on State Street.

      As for the crazy high prices, look at Manhattan — 3 to 4 bedrooms apartments are out of reach of many or even most upper class professional types. Combine that with the massive bourgie-ification of Carroll Gardens, Boerum Hill etc., and you get very high prices.

  • The 9 Townhouses project on State Street (and the previous 14 Townhouses development) is 1-3/4 miles away. W.T.F.

    There are plenty of Park Slope comps, not sure why that is relevant. But as long as we’re going off on tangents…

    http://streeteasy.com/nyc/house/14-town-houses

    $2.56M was the low end, most were $2.75M – $2.9M; the range never went as low as $2.1M.

  • Regardless of whether the State St townhouses are proper comps (they are, of course, not), I think this place may actually be slightly underpriced (!!). Recall that other impeccably renovated, large and historic homes in this part of Park Slope have sold as high as over $4M recently, and this house looks like it fits that bill (though perhaps some utilities or unpictured parts of the house are not up-to-date?). I think this place will go for over ask.

  • Regardless of whether the State St townhouses are proper comps (they are, of course, not), I think this place may actually be slightly underpriced (!!). Recall that other impeccably renovated, large and historic homes in this part of Park Slope have sold as high as over $4M recently, and this house looks like it fits that bill (though perhaps some utilities or unpictured parts of the house are not up-to-date?). I think this place will go for over ask.

  • You cannot really compare the brownstone brooklyn market with some other parts of NYC or US. most of the buyers in these area are more upper middle class and with huge down payments and reno budget.

  • Historic power.
    Did Washington live here – or perhaps Henry VIII popped in?

  • Historic power.
    Did Washington live here – or perhaps Henry VIII popped in?

  • Ew, the interior of this place is hideous.

  • I don’t quite agree with “dashey” but the photographs appear to be computerized “staging” of an empty house.

  • there is nothing “upper middle class” about a 3.5 million mansion. That’s upper class, only the very tiniest upper percentage of the American financial pyramid can afford something like this.

  • Don’t think the furniture is photoshopped into these pics…but could be wrong.

    I’ve been in one of the homes like this one on a house tour, and I find the front foyer on the first floor an oddly formal, outdated use of space. It would work, however, for someone who wanted an office with people coming in from the street, without having them access the rest of the house (no waiting room, though, which would be difficult for many client-based businesses.) The side servant stair gives you (narrow) access to the rest of the house without going through the foyer.

    But you’d still have the problem of the dining room a floor above the living room. I’d likely use the foyer as a dining room, and not the one on the parlor floor, if I lived there (which I wouldn’t – would buy a layout I liked better, were I shopping for a townhouse.) Lack of parlor floor powder room a drag, but hate to disturb details and grand rooms to put one in.

    Third floor OK, if you are going to use it all as a master suite and Ok with having the bedroom now used as a library have bathroom access without going through the master bedroom. It is always a problem with bedrooms on two floors to decide where to put the laundry – I’d want it on the lower bedroom floor – you can install a chute between floors, or roll a bag of dirty clothes down the stairs, but you can’t as easily send it up a floor.

    Guess that’s not a problem – if you can buy this house, your cleaning lady does your laundry.

  • Don’t think the furniture is photoshopped into these pics…but could be wrong.

    I’ve been in one of the homes like this one on a house tour, and I find the front foyer on the first floor an oddly formal, outdated use of space. It would work, however, for someone who wanted an office with people coming in from the street, without having them access the rest of the house (no waiting room, though, which would be difficult for many client-based businesses.) The side servant stair gives you (narrow) access to the rest of the house without going through the foyer.

    But you’d still have the problem of the dining room a floor above the living room. I’d likely use the foyer as a dining room, and not the one on the parlor floor, if I lived there (which I wouldn’t – would buy a layout I liked better, were I shopping for a townhouse.) Lack of parlor floor powder room a drag, but hate to disturb details and grand rooms to put one in.

    Third floor OK, if you are going to use it all as a master suite and Ok with having the bedroom now used as a library have bathroom access without going through the master bedroom. It is always a problem with bedrooms on two floors to decide where to put the laundry – I’d want it on the lower bedroom floor – you can install a chute between floors, or roll a bag of dirty clothes down the stairs, but you can’t as easily send it up a floor.

    Guess that’s not a problem – if you can buy this house, your cleaning lady does your laundry.