DOT Says No to Residential Parking Permits Near Arena


In a decision sure to disappoint many residents of Fort Greene, Prospect Heights, Park Slope and even Boerum Hill and Clinton Hill, DOT has decreed that residential parking permits are not merited by the increased crowds and traffic that the Barclays Arena will bring; DOT argues that the overall nighttime vacancy rates of 19 percent during the week and 27 percent on the weekends are sufficient to absorb arena visitors who don’t want to spend money on a garage. The agency issued its findings in a study of the parking conditions around both the Barclays Center and Yankeee Stadium, which was also denied permits; 60 percent of visitors to Yankee Stadium come by car, whereas officials are projecting that number to be only 30 percent at Barclays because of the better mass transit options. One of the inherent flaws of the study seems to be that it paints the plight of entire neighborhoods with one brush, treating someone who lives (and parks) at Carlton and Bergen (just a couple of blocks from the arena) the same as someone at, say, Park Place and Underhill. “DOT missed the boat,” Gib Veconi of the Prospect Heights Neighborhood Development Council told The New York Post. “The permits aren’t about entitlement or guaranteeing parking for residents. They’re about discouraging people from driving to games.” Council Member Letitia James wasn’t pleased with the decision either, though DOT says it will revisit the issue after the arena opens. To be fair, the city doesn’t currently offer residential parking permits anywhere, so the decision is probably being viewed as a precedent-setter that could open the floodgates for requests from every neighborhood in town. For a more detailed analysis of the news, check out Atlantic Yards Report.

39 Comment

  • They should have residential parking for all of nyc but limited to some streets. this way Alot of insurance dodgers who use their vacation homes upstate or family outside state to get insurance will stop taking up spots.

    The upstate thing is very common, but plate looks the same nobody could tell.

    This would force them to pay the same as people who don’t do it.

  • It’s already hard to find parking on Washington Ave specially on Sundays with those two churches in service. Good thing I don’t drive and my building has parking space for sale.

  • Yeah, it’s amazing how many South Carolinians park their cars in Brooklyn

  • Is anybody surprised? The same city that supported taking peope’s homes to build a private basketball arena and high rises is hardly going to protect people’s parking! They want all transportation access to money making at the arena to be available…it has always been quite clear who and what was valued here.

  • “nighttime vacancy rates of 19 percent during the week and 27 percent on the weekends”

    Huh? Where ?!

  • Is there a neighborhood called Fulton st, or is this just referencing that street independently from the rest of Clinton HIll?

  • Is there a neighborhood called Fulton st, or is this just referencing that street independently from the rest of Clinton HIll?

  • dash

    Not that I support the arena in any way, but… Spend some time in L.A. (Santa Monica in particular) and see what a mess preferential parking can become. I can understand the city not wanting to open such a can of worms.

  • dogandponyshow

    Those parking vacancy assertions of 19% week / 27% weekend are complete insanity. Who was doing the counting I ask?! I’ve lived in prime North Slope a few blocks from the arena – parking was a constant nightmarish joke every day. If you work a 9-5 and can’t be around to move the car for street cleaning, forget it – you’ve got tickets every week for sure. I live in Crown Heights now, where it’s better but not great and will only get worse as the arena pushes ppl out farther in every way possible. Cut us a break, man. I would pay nicely for a parking permit.

    • The nighttime vacancy rates are most likely a result of the alternate side parking regulations you refer to, which cause many residents to avoid the side that will be cleaned the following morning, leaving a lot of spots open for people who will only be parking for the evening.

      I’m surprised you are in favor of the parking permit plan as a Crown Heights resident (I am one too). It would prevent us from parking in the protected neighborhoods (e.g., to run errands or go to BAM when there is no event at the arena) and also would likely encourage out of towners to park in our neighborhood and take a short subway ride to the arena, so a double negative for us. (Yes, I know, I should be walking or biking to Park Slope or Fort Greene, but that’s not so easy in the winter with a toddler.)

      I personally think that driving will unfortunately be the most convenient option for some people coming to the arena, and they will drive whether or not there is free parking available. Therefore parking permits wouldn’t make much difference in terms of overall traffic, they would just protect free parking spots for certain residents. That’s not good policy.

  • yeah, the study didn’t really make much sense except when viewed as a results-oriented attempt at shutting down early advocacy. i’m not really sympathetic to arguments oriented solely toward preserving parking for residents, but from the perspective of traffic mitigation, barclays is going to have twice the number of events as yankee stadium, year-round when people with cars are actually in the city, including a much higher proportion of night events and more family/regional events likely to draw drivers. also, if arena parkers will limit themselves to a 10-minute walk from the arena, as the report notes, why did they not then analyze this smaller area separately?

    i hope that they do whatever “post-opening” traffic studies in late-september/early october, so that they can capture all the traffic during the jay-z concerts. seems only fair, since they are clearly trying to make a show of crowd-pleasing ticket prices for concerts by highly successful locals.

  • I live within the study area and certainly have concerns about an influx of arena traffic. However, the whole permit thing is a big can of worms. While I suppose a resident parking zone might reduce the chance of parking headaches on game/event days, there would be a lot of downsides: (1) having to deal with (and pay for) a new DMV-like bureaucracy running the program; (2) another renewal deadline to forget and get ticketed for (like inspection and registration); (3) an extra hassle for people visiting from out of town (yes, I know that other cities give each household a certain # of visitor passes, but that’s yet another bureaucratic process).

    The whole illegal vehicle registration/insurance fraud issue is a different issue. If someone crunched the numbers and could show that parking permits could curb the practice, the potential benefits (increased registration revenues for the city, less money spent chasing down ticket deadbeats via the south carolina DMV, maybe even lower insurance rates for the honest folks) MIGHT be worth it — but that’s a different study that no one’s done yet.

  • I live within the study area and certainly have concerns about an influx of arena traffic. However, the whole permit thing is a big can of worms. While I suppose a resident parking zone might reduce the chance of parking headaches on game/event days, there would be a lot of downsides: (1) having to deal with (and pay for) a new DMV-like bureaucracy running the program; (2) another renewal deadline to forget and get ticketed for (like inspection and registration); (3) an extra hassle for people visiting from out of town (yes, I know that other cities give each household a certain # of visitor passes, but that’s yet another bureaucratic process).

    The whole illegal vehicle registration/insurance fraud issue is a different issue. If someone crunched the numbers and could show that parking permits could curb the practice, the potential benefits (increased registration revenues for the city, less money spent chasing down ticket deadbeats via the south carolina DMV, maybe even lower insurance rates for the honest folks) MIGHT be worth it — but that’s a different study that no one’s done yet.

  • It’s New York City, which everyone knows is not the most car-friendly place in the world. If you want a car in the city, deal with the hassle of finding a spot. If you want a car in the city and don’t want the hassle of finding a spot, pay for a space in a garage. If you don’t want the hassle and don’t want to pay for a space in a garage, don’t have a car. Not difficult.

    I don’t support putting a massive eye-sore in the middle of four wonderful neighborhoods, but the fact that it is there is not a reason to change precedent. Parking is difficult in every neighborhood. Just because there’s an arena coming doesn’t grant special treatment.

  • It’s New York City, which everyone knows is not the most car-friendly place in the world. If you want a car in the city, deal with the hassle of finding a spot. If you want a car in the city and don’t want the hassle of finding a spot, pay for a space in a garage. If you don’t want the hassle and don’t want to pay for a space in a garage, don’t have a car. Not difficult.

    I don’t support putting a massive eye-sore in the middle of four wonderful neighborhoods, but the fact that it is there is not a reason to change precedent. Parking is difficult in every neighborhood. Just because there’s an arena coming doesn’t grant special treatment.

  • It’s going to be a parking nightmare, no doubt, and I think there will be considerable spillover to satellite neighborhoods a couple stops from the arena (say along the B/Q/2/3/4/5) People coming in from farther out could park and then take a 5-minute train ride to Atlantic. That said, neighborhood parking permits would start a domino effect of demands for the same in surrounding neighborhoods. And how would disputes be settled over borders? E.G., people in Prospect Heights could park across Washington in Crown Heights, but not the reverse? That would be wildly unfair and nobody in the bordering neighborhoods would ever accept it.

  • It’s going to be a parking nightmare, no doubt, and I think there will be considerable spillover to satellite neighborhoods a couple stops from the arena (say along the B/Q/2/3/4/5) People coming in from farther out could park and then take a 5-minute train ride to Atlantic. That said, neighborhood parking permits would start a domino effect of demands for the same in surrounding neighborhoods. And how would disputes be settled over borders? E.G., people in Prospect Heights could park across Washington in Crown Heights, but not the reverse? That would be wildly unfair and nobody in the bordering neighborhoods would ever accept it.

  • Once again, the needs of the community surrounding the arena is dead last. A 19% vacancy rate on the weekdays and a 27% vacancy rate on the weekends translates as follows. The community will just have to either compete or wait until event attendees leave the neighborhood. DOT’s decision is not Brownstone Brooklyn friendly.

  • Once again, the needs of the community surrounding the arena is dead last. A 19% vacancy rate on the weekdays and a 27% vacancy rate on the weekends translates as follows. The community will just have to either compete or wait until event attendees leave the neighborhood. DOT’s decision is not Brownstone Brooklyn friendly.

  • no-permits

    lol now there’s a park slope east and a park slope west?

  • no-permits

    lol now there’s a park slope east and a park slope west?

  • East New York

    “The permits aren’t about entitlement or guaranteeing parking for residents”

    That’s exactly what they’re about. Certainly the latter.

  • “I think there will be considerable spillover to satellite neighborhoods a couple stops from the arena” and that is the very reason this is a bad plan. I rarely agree with DOT, this time is one of them. Share and share alike. Permits will just push the overall burden to other neighborhoods. Period.

    • share and share alike? i’m not in favor of RPP, but “share alike” is a laughably transparent NIMBY reason to be opposed to it. the externalities of this arena should be shared with all neighborhoods, and RPP would merely spread around (i.e. SHARE) the “overall burden,” so granting RPP would actually fit squarely within your “share and share alike” philosophy.

      • In what way would banning non-resident parking around the arena share the “overall burden”? It would push the problem outwards, and create an entire border region of second-class-parking citizens. Seriously, per the map above, somebody who lived on President St. in the Slope wouldn’t be allowed to park on Berkeley, but someone on Berkeley could park on President. There’s no way to make that fair, and the demand for residential parking permits would spread to every neighborhood.

  • w_p: hardly NIMBY at all…it will be in “all our back yards” or streets, rather. The impact will be felt by all surrounding neighborhoods in various degrees. RPP would simply push the burden to other neighborhoods, not share, what I believe most of us agree on, an undo burned on this area of Brooklyn due to the arena. I fully expect folks to park in my neighborhood and grab the R to the arena. But I prefer to not have the majority of that burden simply shifted due to one’s proximity to the arena.

    That’s my idea of “sharing” the burden.

  • sorry you guys just don’t get how traffic reduction works!

    1) the “overall burden” is not the burden just of parking, but the burden of *traffic.* totally, totally disingenuous to suggest that greenwood heights will be sharing equally in that burden. the DOT’s study showed that the area within 10 minutes of the arena is the core area where people will be looking to park, and that seems sensible. And they’ll be looking to park there in part BECAUSE of the free spaces. Reducing the amount of free spaces in that 10-minute ring will reduce the overall volume of drivers (studies show this), which will help everyone. And actually, reducing the overall volume will help YOU the most. It’s not likely that even successful efforts would meaningfully reduce the traffic in the 10-minute ring, because enough people will be looking for any kind of parking (or be looking to avoid jams on flatbush or whatever) to clog our streets before and after events.

    2) RPP is not the same thing as “banning” non-residential parking. there are many ways to do it, and to do it more fairly (limiting RPP to certain hours, RPP to park for more than, say, 2 hours, etc., metered parking during arena events with an exception for local registrations, whatever). Lots of things people with brains could come up with that would serve the purposes of traffic mitigation and provide the neighborhood with some measure of relief given the unequal burden already placed on it. They do it in other cities, and NYC is just not that special.

  • ianmac47

    Residential parking permits would only make sense if the city charged market rates. The majority of households that don’t own cars shouldn’t be subsidizing your free parking.

  • w_p: Agreed with the traffic issue in the 10 minute ring, not about the parking. The argument has been discussed ad nauseum for years…and long before the arena. Let’s just agree that RPP has flaws (in any city) and a better overall solution has never been addressed by DOT, pre or post AY. I lived in Ft. Greene for almost 20 years, and that nexus has always been a nightmare.

    As afar as RPP in other cities, I recently lived in Boston for 3 months. The section of town I was in had RPP…and it was ridiculous. It was elitist and did not give equal benefit the to main demographics of the neighborhood: upper class whites and working class Blacks/Hispanics. But that has as much to do with gentrification than anything else…however to had to pay-to-play, thus you can guess the make of most of the cars on the streets. Fortunately the area we were in was built with courtyards and alley ways that allow non RPP parking, though normally associated with a particular building. But, that’s Boston, not Brooklyn. Huge density difference and very different street grid.

  • bk1lnite

    That’s an interesting idea. Create Barclays area parking permits for on-street spaces near the arena. Sell them not only to residents, but also to Nets season ticket holders, people who drive to work there, whoever, for whatever the market will bear. Maybe $2500/year for a permit and sell 4000 of them to raise $10million a year in revenue for the city.

  • I would support a $1000/yr parking pass. Get rid of the parked cars that just switch sides but never go anywhere and you would have no problem. Take a dollar van and quit crying.

  • Residential parking permits are un-civic. You want to dry up the available parking spots? Slowly begin to flip 10% of all parking spaces within 10 blocks of the arena into bike racks or expanded sidewalks.

  • In all of these comparisons that you and others do about the parking situation neglects the fact that Madison Square Garden has no parking. They have Rangers, concerts, Knicks, conventions, etc. Hosting more than the size of a typical Barclays arena event with only off-site private parking lots. I think that is the most fare comparison, not Yankee stadium. MSG and BA both have LIRR, and plenty of subways and buses.

  • Refresh my memory: why do we allow permanent car storage on the public streets? Is that why we build streets? Could I, as a pedestrian, live on the sidewalk? Or store my furniture in the street, taking up half the roadway? I am sure there is a reason – just refresh my memory.
    Christopher Gray

  • Refresh my memory: why do we allow permanent car storage on the public streets? Is that why we build streets? Could I, as a pedestrian, live on the sidewalk? Or store my furniture in the street, taking up half the roadway? I am sure there is a reason – just refresh my memory.
    Christopher Gray

  • cp

    where are the free spots in boerum hill? i can’t seem to find them whenever i try to park there; i gave up and just take the subway and walk far; except in winter.

  • cp

    where are the free spots in boerum hill? i can’t seem to find them whenever i try to park there; i gave up and just take the subway and walk far; except in winter.