13 Comment

  • Another crappy decision from the DOT. I live on Atlantic Avenue which already resembles the BQE. The only thing that actually moves the traffic is that extra lane. Now that 4-7 NO PARKING is going away, it will move even slower than usual. So there is yet another reason to hate the Barclay Center.

  • I live right behind Atlantic. I think this is a smart decision for three reasons:

    1. During the busiest time of the day, it creates a safety buffer between the honking, moving traffic and pedestrians on the sidewalk.

    2. For businesses on Atlantic, it actually provides incentive and space for cars to park (relatively) close and patronize the independent businesses.

    3. It makes Atlantic Avenue much LESS like the BQE — where there are three lanes of moving traffic — and more like a neighborhood street.

    Bonus reason: it reduces the amount of cars that can use Atlantic Avenue, which means, after an adjustment period, less cars will use Atlantic Avenue.

    AND DOT is eliminating left-hand turns at Bond & Hoyt, which also makes it safer for pedestrians to cross those intersections. Only things I’m concerned about are signal timing (which DOT is increasing) which I hope that doesn’t allow more speeding — and that they didn’t eliminate the left-hand turn at Nevins.

    C:

  • Are they out of their freakin’ minds???? The only reason traffic is not at a complete standstill on eastbound Atlantic Avenue during the afternoon rush is because of that third traffic lane. This is going to cause traffic to back up from 4th Avenue all the way to Boerum Place/Adams Street! Mark my words. Also, it seems like the DOT wants to have it’s cake and eat it too. Take this line from their release:

    “New York’s streets are our front yards and the economic engines of our city,” said Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan. “Our streets need to keep pace with changes that we’re seeing in neighborhoods like Boerum Hill to keep them working for the businesses and residents that depend on them.”

    Wait a minute… isn’t this the same commissioner who routinely argues in Manhattan that they don’t need curbside street parking in order for storefront businesses to be successful; to thrive? Study after study has shown that relatively few people in NYC drive in order to patronize these local businesses. Therefore, the argument that the parking is needed in order to make it easy for customers to get to the stores is moot. In fact, the DOT argues this case in Manhattan all the time. You can’t have it both ways.

    Then there’s this little ditty:

    “Additionally, new No Left Turn restrictions will be instituted on eastbound Atlantic Avenue at Smith Street from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., Monday through Friday, and at Bond Street at all times, as well as on westbound Atlantic Avenue at Hoyt Street, also at all times. These changes will eliminate congestion caused by turning vehicles and provide two through travel lanes in each direction. DOT will implement these changes in early July and then monitor traffic flow on nearby streets.”

    Again… are you freakin’ kidding me????? How the heck am I supposed to get to my home from Atlantic Avenue now? How the hell are people supposed to get to the parking lots and other destinations on Smith/Jay Street if they are coming from the BQE and they can’t turn left onto Smith/Jay from Atlantic? Also, if this is really about supporting local businesses why would they take away the left turn from westbound Atlantic onto Hoyt Street? Many people heading to the businesses on Smith Street from westbound Atlantic utilize this popular left turn onto Hoyt. That was the whole reason the DOT installed a left turn signal at that intersection in the first place. It makes it seem like the people making the traffic routing decisions in Brooklyn have no understanding of drivers’ trends.

    While we’re talking about improving Atlantic Avenue it should be pointed out that the DOT caused many traffic flow problems when it created left turn only lanes on eastbound Atlantic at Adams Street and westbound Atlantic at Court Street. Anyone who has driven on Atlantic Avenue knows that if you are in the left lane you are suddenly presented with this surprise without any warning. Stand out there and you’ll see the sudden panic among drivers as they frantically try to get out of the left turn only lanes. Why is that? Because the DOT did not install an signs that alert drivers to the fact that the left lane is about to become a turn only lane. There have been several accidents at these intersections as a result of the lack of signage. Doesn’t anyone from DOT observe traffic flow after they make changes like this? People have been complaining about this through official channels. All they need to do is install a sign a block earlier that tells drives the left lane ahead is for turns only. Problem solved.

    • Now that I think about this I can’t help but wonder if this is really about creating more street parking availability ahead of events at the Barclay Center. Hmmmm

      • Think of all the people that will be trying to make that left on Hoyt or Bond. Now they will have to make a right and double back. Good luck if you live/are looking for a parking space on Pacific St.

    • Just curious what neighborhood your home is in, Steve.

      Because the main answer to your question is: “parking lots” are not the best “destination” for Atlantic Avenue and Downtown Brooklyn to have.

      This whole thing is designed to make Atlantic Avenue a destination, not a highway. You want a highway, stay on the BQE.

  • Are they out of their freakin’ minds???? The only reason traffic is not at a complete standstill on eastbound Atlantic Avenue during the afternoon rush is because of that third traffic lane. This is going to cause traffic to back up from 4th Avenue all the way to Boerum Place/Adams Street! Mark my words. Also, it seems like the DOT wants to have it’s cake and eat it too. Take this line from their release:

    “New York’s streets are our front yards and the economic engines of our city,” said Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan. “Our streets need to keep pace with changes that we’re seeing in neighborhoods like Boerum Hill to keep them working for the businesses and residents that depend on them.”

    Wait a minute… isn’t this the same commissioner who routinely argues in Manhattan that they don’t need curbside street parking in order for storefront businesses to be successful; to thrive? Study after study has shown that relatively few people in NYC drive in order to patronize these local businesses. Therefore, the argument that the parking is needed in order to make it easy for customers to get to the stores is moot. In fact, the DOT argues this case in Manhattan all the time. You can’t have it both ways.

    Then there’s this little ditty:

    “Additionally, new No Left Turn restrictions will be instituted on eastbound Atlantic Avenue at Smith Street from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., Monday through Friday, and at Bond Street at all times, as well as on westbound Atlantic Avenue at Hoyt Street, also at all times. These changes will eliminate congestion caused by turning vehicles and provide two through travel lanes in each direction. DOT will implement these changes in early July and then monitor traffic flow on nearby streets.”

    Again… are you freakin’ kidding me????? How the heck am I supposed to get to my home from Atlantic Avenue now? How the hell are people supposed to get to the parking lots and other destinations on Smith/Jay Street if they are coming from the BQE and they can’t turn left onto Smith/Jay from Atlantic? Also, if this is really about supporting local businesses why would they take away the left turn from westbound Atlantic onto Hoyt Street? Many people heading to the businesses on Smith Street from westbound Atlantic utilize this popular left turn onto Hoyt. That was the whole reason the DOT installed a left turn signal at that intersection in the first place. It makes it seem like the people making the traffic routing decisions in Brooklyn have no understanding of drivers’ trends.

    While we’re talking about improving Atlantic Avenue it should be pointed out that the DOT caused many traffic flow problems when it created left turn only lanes on eastbound Atlantic at Adams Street and westbound Atlantic at Court Street. Anyone who has driven on Atlantic Avenue knows that if you are in the left lane you are suddenly presented with this surprise without any warning. Stand out there and you’ll see the sudden panic among drivers as they frantically try to get out of the left turn only lanes. Why is that? Because the DOT did not install an signs that alert drivers to the fact that the left lane is about to become a turn only lane. There have been several accidents at these intersections as a result of the lack of signage. Doesn’t anyone from DOT observe traffic flow after they make changes like this? People have been complaining about this through official channels. All they need to do is install a sign a block earlier that tells drives the left lane ahead is for turns only. Problem solved.

  • This is only going to put more traffic on the side streets in the neighborhood.

  • I live in Clinton Hill. My son goes to PS 261 on Pacific. Even now driving over there to drop him off or pick him up is a nightmare. Answer? I don’t drive. He takes the MTA bus himself in the morning down Fulton and walks himself to school. In the afternoon I do the same or even just walk there to pick him up. It is faster than driving. It is never ever worth it to drive. And that’s okay.

  • >You want a highway, stay on the BQE

    Exactly. People who love driving and car sewers don’t understand what this change is about. It’s about reducing and slowing traffic, which happens when you remove a lane (I can cite.) It will make Atlantic somewhat more of a neighborhood street. Now they need to ticket the speeders. Parking on both sides also makes it seem safer as chuck said..

    The only wrong thing is increasing light timing…they should be *reduced* so that there’s more randomness in traffic flow, which is perceptually good for pedestrians and limits speeding.

    • While I am all for neighborhood streets the fact is Atlantic Avenue is a thru avenue. It was not designed to be a neighborhood street. It was designed to move large volumes of traffic and large trucks efficiently. I applaud attempts to make crossing the street safer for pedestrians, I walk across Atlantic Avenue every day, but we have to acknowledge that some thoroughfares serve the community best when the move vehicle traffic efficiently from point A to point B. I walk. I bike. I take public transit buses. I use the subway. But I also recognize that impeding the flow of traffic on major thoroughfares, especially those designated as truck routes, is not a net benefit for business. There is a cost associated with spending more time in transit as a result of taking away a traffic lane, especially for delivery of goods. It might make sense to implement these kind of changes on an avenue like 8th Avenue in Park Slope or Prospect Park West or Court Street. But we also need wide avenues like Atlantic that can move large volumes of traffic efficiently during peek usage periods. We need a healthy mix of both.

      • Maybe it was designed incorrectly. Certainly there is no reason to presume that Atlantic Ave *needs* to be a major through street.

        And your concerns about deliveries are totally unfounded. Commercial deliveries don’t happen at 5:30 pm on a weekday. They happen in the middle of the night, when Atlantic Ave could be a one-lane street and still have enough room for trucks to come by (obviously not advocating it being a one-lane street, for those who don’t understand hyperbole).

      • Maybe it was designed incorrectly. Certainly there is no reason to presume that Atlantic Ave *needs* to be a major through street.

        And your concerns about deliveries are totally unfounded. Commercial deliveries don’t happen at 5:30 pm on a weekday. They happen in the middle of the night, when Atlantic Ave could be a one-lane street and still have enough room for trucks to come by (obviously not advocating it being a one-lane street, for those who don’t understand hyperbole).