Condo of the Day: 438 12th Street, #6A


We’re really digging this lofty condo at the Ansonia at 438 12th Street, we’re just not sure we’d want to pay over $1,000 a foot in the South Slope. The living room has gigantic windows with unobstructed views to the south and west, and there’s even some private outdoor space in addition to three bedrooms. Still, $1,530,000 for 1,415 square feet?
438 12th Street, #6A [Brown Harris Stevens] GMAP P*Shark

28 Comment

  • With that sliding door between the third bedroom and living/dining area, it’s hard to really think of that as a third bedroom.

  • no-permits

    calling this south slope? i don’t know about that.

  • I dont like the way the 2 windows are seperated with that slim wall. It should have of been one less bedroom and a bugger living space. It should be just 2 bedrooms, that sliding thing looks retarded.

    I dont like the layout.

  • I dont like the way the 2 windows are seperated with that slim wall. It should have of been one less bedroom and a bugger living space. It should be just 2 bedrooms, that sliding thing looks retarded.

    I dont like the layout.

  • South Slope-or not just “Park Slope” has always started after 9th st.

  • no-permits

    if i had to use the word south slope, which i never would because it’s completely made up, i’d say anything on the other side of 15th street.

  • no-permits

    if i had to use the word south slope, which i never would because it’s completely made up, i’d say anything on the other side of 15th street.

  • I really like this bldg, great location… I wonder what it’s like in that shared courtyard, how territorial people get!?

    no-permits, what nabe is this? BTW, people like you that care about such stuff are generally fools.

  • It just depends on how long you’ve been here I guess. When I moved here if someone said they lived on 12th st in Park Slope, they would have been corrected. Today Park Slope apparently runs into Sunset Park. Which will probably be called “New Park Slope” or “Sunset Slope” or something soon enough, then Park Slope can run all the way to Bay Ridge. Anyway, this condo is too expensive, Park Slope proper or not.

  • It just depends on how long you’ve been here I guess. When I moved here if someone said they lived on 12th st in Park Slope, they would have been corrected. Today Park Slope apparently runs into Sunset Park. Which will probably be called “New Park Slope” or “Sunset Slope” or something soon enough, then Park Slope can run all the way to Bay Ridge. Anyway, this condo is too expensive, Park Slope proper or not.

  • I didn’t think there was this much confusion about the boundaries of Park Slope since they are pretty well defined by major roads. North Slope is Flatbush / Bergen to Union. Center Slope is Union to 9th. South Slope is 9th to the Expressway. 5th Ave used to be the western border but now its 4th. past that is Gowanas. The park is obviously the eastern border. – Coming from someone who’s lived in the hood on and off since ’88

  • rh

    South Slope may be a made up broker name…I can’t be bothered to check the origins, but when I was looking to purchase my house back in 1993/94, it was definitely called “South Slope”. So, a bit more than the last 5 years.

  • The New York City Department of City Planning officially designated “South Park Slope” in 2005, but the term was used long before that. So it’s been official for over 7 years and it wasn’t coined solely by brokers.

    • no-permits

      the link you posted has to due with zoning, and not the naming of the area. click through some of the “project, studies and proposals” and see how they refer to certain areas.

  • The one thing you are correct about, no-permits is that the apartment above is in Park Slope, not South Park Slope. South Park Slope “officially” begins at 15th and goes to 24th. That’s according to the City of New York. Not Corcoran.

  • Lived in and out of the slope since ’81, mostly in. Back in the 80s, northern slope did mean those (then) undesirable blocks in the northern section, which would be, looking at a map, the northen triangle on the map…with the 4th Ave./Atlantic/Flatbush intersection at the top, with borders running down Flatbush to 7th Ave., and over 4th Ave. to Union St, and up Union to 6th or so, and then sort of zigzagging over toward 7th and Flatbush…it wasn’t so much a street boundary on that side, rather a state of the block, less gentrified. I lived on two such blocks there, as well as one in what was later termed center slope, but then just park slope, which was from Unon St on over to some undefined edge, maybe 5th St., maybe 8th – as with the northern part of the slope, it was more of a direction than a specific outline.

    Out of the slope for a few years, came back in early 90s, and avoided all ads saying N. Slope when looking for apartments, as I wanted to live more up slope again. Only once I was back did I realize that realtors and landlords now used ‘north’ slope in a positive sense…duh, I should have figured that since it was now in ads, and hadn’t been in the 80s. Seemed like now they were using N. Slope and Center slope as defined areas, and the north slope had expanded a lot to include anything not in the now defined center slope.

    9th st and beyond was always southern slope back then, and anything beyond 14th St was not Park Slope. The part from above 7th ave and up was considered Windsor Terrace, on the other side, Sunset Park. Yes, old names like Greenwood have been revived (nothing wrong with that). Yes, the use of South Slope on signs beyond 14th began as gentrification spread, but was not in use when I was first there. And since the rezoning in 2005, there is apparently a South Park Slope neighborhood now. We differ on what we call the areas because the names have changed a lot over the past few decades.

    Originally, the slope did not go to the expressway, as the area was named, I think, long before there was an expressway. It went from where there was park (14th st) down to where the slope stopped sloping at 4th Ave. Between 4th and 5th aves was not gentrified for many years, but it was considered part of the slope.

  • While it’s interesting to contemplate the changes in names over the decades, and many people will be surprised to learn of the South Park Slope designation, let’s not forget that at some point in time there was a large area known as South Brooklyn. Didn’t that extend to what is now Park Slope?

    Not a lot of discussion about the apartment though!

  • I like that building but since you can practically buy a small house in the same area for the same price, why?