10 Comment

  • I have not been following the issue closely, but this “solution” seems idiotic.

    I understand the issue with stack parking: if it takes too long to park the cars–which will all arrive at roughly the same time–then traffic jams will be worse and people will drive around the neighborhood looking for street parking.

    The solution, according to the NY1 article, is to reduce the available parking by 50% from 1,100 cars to 550 cars. Won’t that cause the other 550 drivers to drive around the neighborhood looking for places to park? Traffic will be even worse since, instead of just backing up while the lots slowly fill, they will now actually just sit there once the lots are full having nowhere to go other than the clogged side streets.

    • If you have paid money for a game or circus or some other show, don’t you need to get there in a timely fashion (i.e. before it starts)? I would think this is a very good solution, because once people drive there once, they will realize that after those 550 spaces are gone, the parking in the surrounding neighborhoods is going to be very minimal. Even without the arena, there is very little extra parking in the surrounding areas. One would hope that next time, they won’t drive at all, and will take advantage of the many trains that terminate directly in front of this new arena. You aren’t going to be able to drive around looking for parking for an hour, if you need to get inside and get to a game. We need to do things to give incentives for people to use mass transportation, not reward them for driving. Drivers already get too much and have ruined a large hunk of this nation with freeways, pollution, increased asthma rates and other things. Let’s not give them thousands of parking spaces, when right next door is long island railroad and a dozen subway lines. Cars are necessary in some areas, but this is not one of them.

      • What you say makes sense in theory, and I agree with you, but we all know that there are a lot of people who do things that don’t make sense. For example: Rick Santorum. Haha. In any case, this parking lot appears to be a temporary lot until the underground parking is finished in a few years.

      • In theory. In practice, as bklynarch has pointed out, half of all human beings are of below average intelligence. And a good number of the above-averagers make dumb choices, too.

        • many, many transit studies have shown that increased parking just increases the number of people who will drive, and that the inverse is also true. it is the classic “if you build it, they will come” situation. and even if one chooses not to believe science, is it not wiser first to the results of the (relative) status quo, and then try the more intrusive, more difficult, scientifically disfavored approach only when necessary?

    • If you have paid money for a game or circus or some other show, don’t you need to get there in a timely fashion (i.e. before it starts)? I would think this is a very good solution, because once people drive there once, they will realize that after those 550 spaces are gone, the parking in the surrounding neighborhoods is going to be very minimal. Even without the arena, there is very little extra parking in the surrounding areas. One would hope that next time, they won’t drive at all, and will take advantage of the many trains that terminate directly in front of this new arena. You aren’t going to be able to drive around looking for parking for an hour, if you need to get inside and get to a game. We need to do things to give incentives for people to use mass transportation, not reward them for driving. Drivers already get too much and have ruined a large hunk of this nation with freeways, pollution, increased asthma rates and other things. Let’s not give them thousands of parking spaces, when right next door is long island railroad and a dozen subway lines. Cars are necessary in some areas, but this is not one of them.

  • just double-park on Dean St. – I never seen anyone get a ticket for doing this.

  • I have attended events at MSG over the years with many many friends from the suburbs and outer boroughs – Long Island, NJ, Westerchester, Bay Ridge. Not once did any of them drive in. They always used public transportation, realizing that parkign and traffic would be a nightmare around 34th St whereas public transit options were many and excellent. Why would people behave any differently around AY?