Barclays Center Transportation Plan Revealed


We’ve tried to pull together all the coverage from media outlets that pertains to the release of last night’s traffic plan for the Barclays Center, as can be seen in the links below. Here are the main points, as we understand them:
1. “You’ll want to think twice, or maybe even a third time, before deciding to drive to Barclays Arena when it opens on September 28. The parking plan for Barclays is being cut from 1,000 to 541 spots”. -WNYC
2. “The conundrum that Samuel I. Schwartz, the traffic engineering expert, faced was this: How could the already jam-packed streets in the heart of Brooklyn accommodate thousands of extra cars filled with fans traveling to a basketball arena and desperately searching for parking? His answer, revealed on Tuesday to a panel of Brooklyn officials with all the flourish and detail of a general planning to storm the beaches of Normandy, was to discourage driving entirely, by cutting the number of parking spaces at the Barclays Center in half.” -NY Times
3. “While the MTA and LIRR will add transit service after Barclays Center events to encourage use of the adjacent transit hub, and arena operators are trying hard to educated and encourrage event-goers to use such transit, the long-delayed Transportation Demand Management plan released today by developer Forest City Ratner still left arena neighbors worried.” -AY Report
4. “Those residents learned that the city won’t be granting their request for residential parking permits any time soon. The New York City Department of Transportation’s Christopher Hrones said his agency is still studying the issue…He added that even if the city were to approve a parking permit program, it would need permission from the state, and that takes time.” – Transportation Nation

And there you have it: Public transportation will be promoted, there will be far fewer parking spaces than initially anticipated, and no residential parking permits anytime soon.
Traffic Plan for a Brooklyn Arena Cuts Parking Slots by Half [NY Times]
Live Blogging: Barclays Center Traffic Mitigation Plan Public Meeting [Patch]
Barclays Fouls Out on Plan to Provide MetroCards [NY Post]
In Plan For Barclays Center, Parking Slashed By Half [WNYC]
Arena Transportation Plan Released [AY Report]
Meeting on TDM Plan is Cordial, Constructive, and Frustrating [AY Report]

27 Comment

  • ‘ah beep beep’

    as the late Donna Summer would have said

    gonna be interesting around there

  • ‘ah beep beep’

    as the late Donna Summer would have said

    gonna be interesting around there

  • I am all for more parking spaces because – like where i live in The Heights – there is NEVER a spot to be found. But, at this location THERE SHOULD NOT BE ANY PARKING SPACES BUILT. And tickets should have a bold “DO NOT DRIVE TO THE ARENA – THERE IS NO PARKING” printed on them. I was all for the arena, but am worried about the insane traffic.

  • People will not drive. Who drives to Madison Square Garden? Games are at 7 pm. What idiot would choose to drive to a stadium where there are no parking spots, during rush hour (which is nuts in its own right) when the 2,3,4,5,B,D,Q,N,R and LIRR all let out across the street?

  • The best news coverage on the Traffic Plan would just repeat the word “buIIshit” 497 times.

    :C

  • There has been a dramatic increase of parking spaces at new garages in the downtown Brooklyn footprint. All are within a reasonable walking distance of the arena. There is no doubt that parking garage companies like Edison and Central will promote the fact that they are within a 5 to 10 minute walk of the arena. They’ll offer special event-night rates. This isn’t necessarily bad because it will cause people to walk through downtown Brooklyn at hours when the area has been historically deserted. There is a great potential here for new businesses to flourish as a result on game nights. Theoretically, more people on the streets late at night means the area will be safer.

  • “Public transportation will be promoted, there will be far fewer parking spaces than initially anticipated, and no residential parking permits anytime soon.”

    Yeah, good. They got it right this time.

  • They should buy up those old brownstones in Park Slope and build parking garages.

  • Yes – some rational thinking on urban congestion. As I’ve noted before, pretty much every study has found that building more roads = more traffic, not less.

    http://www.freakonomics.com/2011/05/13/does-destroying-highways-solve-urban-traffic-congestion/

    People, despite “loving their cars” are for the most part rational. I have a car and I work in Manhattan (sorry – “The City”). Why don’t I drive? Because traffic bad and parking is expensive. No reason the Barclays Center will be any different.

    • Manhattan parking is a completely different animal from Brownstone Brooklyn parking.

      Manhattan rules – either No Parking or Metered Parking (1hr max) until 10pm-12am, very few spots, about $20 an hr for garage parking in evenings.

      Brooklyn Rules – no Meters after 7pm (when the game/events start), park on virtually any street, garages way cheaper than Manhattan.

      The Manhattan example only works if you make Brooklyn parking rules like Manhattan (which I’m sure tons of anti-car people would love) – and that would absolutely suck for all outer borough car owners.

      • you are not engaging with the central argument, which is that adding more parking spots will do nothing to ease congestion. In fact, it very well may make it worse. If people know it’s a nightmare to drive, they won’t.

        • If people have the option to park for free on city streets, they will. Residents close to Yankee Stadium have complained to their Community Board that the cops reserve spots for game attendees. They built huge parking lots on the site of a former park to accomodate drivers. But they’ve never been more than 60% full on game days. The only way to stop people driving to Barclays Center events is to introduce Residents Parking Permits.

    • Manhattan parking is a completely different animal from Brownstone Brooklyn parking.

      Manhattan rules – either No Parking or Metered Parking (1hr max) until 10pm-12am, very few spots, about $20 an hr for garage parking in evenings.

      Brooklyn Rules – no Meters after 7pm (when the game/events start), park on virtually any street, garages way cheaper than Manhattan.

      The Manhattan example only works if you make Brooklyn parking rules like Manhattan (which I’m sure tons of anti-car people would love) – and that would absolutely suck for all outer borough car owners.

  • Did I get this right… discouraging driving and promoting public transportation is meant to be a plan? I think not.

  • if don’t have a car and don’t drive, who cares about traffic problem. and if you do, you’re just as much of the problem as someone who drives to the arena.

    • Traffic problems still affect pedestrians (virtually all of us), and also those of us who live on a street (all of us) and suffers the constant inundation of horns and sirens. It is very much a safety and quality of life issue, for EVERYONE that is nearby

    • Traffic problems still affect pedestrians (virtually all of us), and also those of us who live on a street (all of us) and suffers the constant inundation of horns and sirens. It is very much a safety and quality of life issue, for EVERYONE that is nearby

  • Why is everyone ignoring the MTA report done several years ago showing that ALL the trains coming through Atlantic Avenue at rush hour are at 100% capacity. At 7pm, all of those trains are full of people commuting home. Is the state planning on running additional trains on game nights? Because if not, there are going to be a lot of people stranded on platforms trying to get back to Brooklyn.

  • Why is everyone ignoring the MTA report done several years ago showing that ALL the trains coming through Atlantic Avenue at rush hour are at 100% capacity. At 7pm, all of those trains are full of people commuting home. Is the state planning on running additional trains on game nights? Because if not, there are going to be a lot of people stranded on platforms trying to get back to Brooklyn.