Brooklyn is Chicken Crazed, Chicken Company Reports


Selections from a press release sent out today by Victory Chicken reporting that Brooklynites are flocking to its services, which include providing customers with chicken coops and hens:
-“We are seeing a huge upswing in demand for our all-in-one coop and chickens package,” says Brett Mons, Victory Chicken’s Business Coordinator.
-Customers who order a “Rosie” get a custom coop built in Brooklyn, three young hens, 2 months of supplies, and a quick training, all of which is delivered and installed at their place in about 2 hours for $785.
-”I love my coop and hens from Victory Chicken!” says Juno Shaye, a customer in Red Hook, Brooklyn. “And I can’t believe how fun and easy it is to keep chickens. It only takes a few minutes a day, and my two-year-old son absolutely loves them. Chickens are hilarious!”
Victory Chicken [Official Site]

35 Comment

  • $785 is the literal equivalent of 3 years’ worth of $5 dozen fancy eggs.

    Minus the ongoing cost of feed and labor.

    Just sayin’.

    C:

  • The real money will be in controlling the increased rat infestations these backyard setups will bring.

  • The real money will be in controlling the increased rat infestations these backyard setups will bring.

  • Nothing against chickens, but as someone with a little experience with them, I will simply say:
    chicken coops = chicken feed = lots ‘o rats

  • and thus another brooklyn trend hits its tipping point.

  • I think chickens are cute, and I’d be into this, but I keep thinking about bird flu. I know, that is neurotic.

  • I buy $2 cartons, so by my math, that would be 393 cartons of eggs to pay that off. But I don’t think it’s about saving money; the eggs probably taste better (if you let them eat bugs and worms too).

  • Hi Folks –

    Victory Chicken here.

    To Chuck: Yeah, if you’re motivation to keep chickens is to save money on eggs, you’ll probably be disappointed. Our customers usually do it for the eggs and as pets and as a hobby and for the fertilizer and, of course, for the glamor.

    To Wrath and Rookie: The coop is enclosed and the run is wrapped with chicken wire, which is also buried underneath, so rats cannot get in. The feed dish is inside the run, so except for a small amount of spillage, rats can’t really get at the food, and don’t really have a reason to hang out around our coops.

    To Jimmy: Not just a Brooklyn trend. This is booming in popularity all over the country, and also in Europe. And with a broad demographic mix. No sign of Tipping point yet, but we’ll keep ya posted.

    Now who wants to buy a chicken?

  • I’m surprised none of you have commented on the lack of architectural detail on the coop

  • Great so in 6mo CACC will not only be overrun with no-longer wanted cats and dogs, but chickens too.

    • “Great so in 6mo CACC will not only be overrun with no-longer wanted cats and dogs, but chickens too”

      fsrq, didnt you say this six months ago when the “coop” thing passed through Bstoner? Big difference between egg laying hens and cats and dogs.

      and if your concerned about what happens when they get sic I think you should focus your efforts and concern on the large corporate egg laying factories. Those hens could really use your help.

    • “Great so in 6mo CACC will not only be overrun with no-longer wanted cats and dogs, but chickens too”

      fsrq, didnt you say this six months ago when the “coop” thing passed through Bstoner? Big difference between egg laying hens and cats and dogs.

      and if your concerned about what happens when they get sic I think you should focus your efforts and concern on the large corporate egg laying factories. Those hens could really use your help.

  • To Heather: While we understand your concern, bird flu is an extremely unlikely scenario with backyard chickens. There has never been a reported case of H5N1 in the US in either a bird or a person, and The CDC has reviewed backyard chicken keeping and is not discouraging people from doing it. That said, it’ll still make some folks nervous, and isn’t a good hobby for everyone.

  • Hi all,

    We live in BedStuy and have four chickens. We’ve had them for two years. No rats at all; we do keep things clean though.

    As for costs, we got two of our hens for free and we paid 10 bucks apiece for the other birds. Every 2 and a half months we spend $25 on a bag of feed (about $200/year when you figure shipping costs). We supplement their food with chopped up greens from our kitchen and other scraps.

    As for housing, we got plans from “Chicken Coops for Dummies” and built a coop ourselves. I don’t remember what we paid in materials, but it wasn’t that expensive: plywood, 2x4s, fasteners, etc.

    We get 3 eggs a day, about 5 to 6 days a week. We eat a lot of eggs, but it’s more than we can eat. I haven’t done the comparative economic analysis, but I’d guess we’re probably losing a bit of money in terms of what we would spend on cheap factory farm eggs at the supermarket, but we come out on top versus buying expensive “free range” eggs at fancy pants groceries.

    All in all, we’re pretty happy with the chickens. Neighbors like them too, and we give ‘em eggs from time to time.

    All in all, we like having birds and love going out to the backyard for fresh eggs. Maintenance is pretty minimal; we clean the coop every day (they do crap a lot, those chickens) but it only takes a few minutes.

    As for Victory Chicken —– I wish them luck, and they look like a great option for anyone who wants instant backyard hens. But speaking for myself, there is no way I’d drop almost a thousand bucks for a couple of birds, a chicken shack, and two months’ feed. Chickens are not a very difficult project; there are plenty of how-to books available through the Brooklyn Public Library.

  • Whats the plan when the birds get sick or injured? You just butcher them? or do you bring them to the vet?

    • Hi fsrq,

      Good question. I confess we haven’t thought it through fully. We’ve had one sick bird so far, and we were able to get things back on track after consulting a backyard hens site on the internet.

      We are planning to butcher when the hens no longer lay eggs. Not that I’m looking forward to it, but hey — meat comes from somewhere, doesn’t it? I hear old hens are not the tastiest in the oven, but they do make terrific soup. Our neighbors are interested (we are less so, as we’re vegetarians!)

  • By the way, influenza that jumps species from animal to human is a serious public health concern. A great place for viruses to mutate is in a densly-populated (and filthy) setting such as a factory farm. Backyard chickens are actually part of the solution.

    Well, I should take that back: a vegan diet adopted by a sufficient number of people across the globe would be the solution — but those of us who eat eggs might want to raise our own.

    A little video on the subject of bird flu from the US Humane Society:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q_22ZaAWSTc

  • I think this is a really cool thing. And I love the name “victory chicken”.

    I live on a little hobby farm myself, and have kept as many as fifty chickens. (Only time I ever saw a rat, the chickens were already killing it.) as long as you keep your feed put up, you won’t have a problem.

    The coop looks great, sturdy, well made and predator proof, and the fact that it comes with hens ready to go is fantastic. If you’ve got the $, it sure makes it very simple.

  • I’d be less concerned about rats than the danger from raccoons. Brooklyn is literally teeming with these wily, dexterous creatures. (Raccoons have even been spotted on the roof of my apt. building.) How raccoon-proof are these chicken coops?

  • I’d be less concerned about rats than the danger from raccoons. Brooklyn is literally teeming with these wily, dexterous creatures. (Raccoons have even been spotted on the roof of my apt. building.) How raccoon-proof are these chicken coops?

  • It’s been legal to keep hens in NYC for a few years, but not roosters.

    Our coop is secured with bolt locks, and the run is wrapped in chicken wire and is designed to keep out raccoons and possum. We bury the wire underneath the coop when we install it to make sure nothing can tunnel in.

  • That is a cute little coop. I’m late to this thread, but wondering what people do with their chickens when it gets really cold. Do they stay outside when temps are in the teens or below? Not so much an issue this winter, but what did people do last year?

    • You buy birds appropriate for the climate. they are fine through the winter. just need a light and battery powered water bowl. the light can provide heat, but also helps with egg production during the short on light months.

    • petunia, you can do what pig-three says.

      I insulated: I modified my “chicken coops for dummies” plan and used extra sheets of thin plywood to sandwich foam board into walls and floors. We put ‘pink panther’ style insulation into the roof during the cold months, and pull it out during warm months. As you note, this year is not an issue. Last year though our birds were fine. On a few of the coldest days last year I put a bowl of water in the coop overnight; it never froze.

  • To Petunia:

    Thanks for the compliment on the coop. We also do them in barnyard red and forest green. As to your question about cold weather, Victory Chicken provides cold weather breeds like Rhode Island Reds and Barred Rocks that have been bred for year round climates colder than NYC. Our coops are built so that you do not need a heat lamp in the winter (though as pig points out, egg production tapers off during the winter without an articficial light). Insulating the interior by pushing some hay up against the walls is all I’ve ever had to do in the winter, and my birds have been outside through sub-zero temps. The water in the dish will occasionally freeze in winter, and so you need to be sure to refill it at least daily in really low temps (or get a heated water dish). But in general, chickens are very hardy and withstand NYC winters just fine. Summer heat is actual more of a concern – make sure they always have plenty of water in the hot summer months!

  • Do the coops boycott israeli chicken feed….?

  • We’ve had chickens in our Clinton Hill backyard since 2010. They ARE hilarious… But can be a bit loud in the morning. We installed an automatic door that doesn’t let them out until 7:30, and it has helped with the noise.

    Sadly, three nights ago a racoon (Yes, a RACOON) ate one of our chickens!!! Make sure your ladies are locked up at night.