Taking Stock of Brooklyn’s Blog Graveyard


Reclaimed Home, a long-time Brooklyn-based blog devoted to architectural salvage and adaptive reuse, was doing some house-cleaning on its blog roll (an old-school concept in itself at this point) and noticed how many Brooklyn blogs have called it quits in the last couple of years. Since we’ve been doing this now for, gulp, more than seven years the round-up made us feel both old and sentimental, common emotions at this time of year. The list of those who’ve packed it in include Bushwick BK (October 2011), Brooklyn Born (August 2011), Bed Stuy Blog (June 2011), Here Be Old Things (February 2011), Bed Stuy Banana (December 2009), Crown Heightser (August 2010), Clinton Hill Blog (July 2010) and Brooklyn Optimist (January 2010). And, of course, the saddest of them all, was the end of Gowanus Lounge, when its creator Bob Guskind died tragically in March 2009. RIP.

8 Comment

  • Without a doubt, commenting here has slowed as well though i suspect that’s more the result of blankslate’s technology and the fact that this site is now blocked by many corporate firewalls.

  • RIP, indeed. CHB had four wonderful years posting almost daily. A move and much-increased personal and professional responsibilities made continuing to create the content I wanted to, on a regular basis, impossible.

  • I’m very sorry to see BushwickBK go. Their original reporting on the arts and local politics was quite an achievement. I’ll miss Aaron Short’s reporting on community board meetings. They did an amazing job with almost no money. They’re the type of online local community reporting that ought to be supported by a Patch or NYT network (with its own private ad exchange and custom sponsorships and integration) because the small amount of traffic a local blog attracts won’t earn much at standard Web rates.

  • Thanks for sharing! I didn’t include Gowanus Lounge because they’re still posting, albeit without Bob Guskind.

    I do wonder if blogs as we know them will eventually start to disappear now that people’s attention spans are getting shorter what with Twitter, Facebook and all. I even notice that some companies no longer have websites….just social media.

    You’re doing it the right way, Brownstoner. As Lesterhead put it, it’s tough to keep up a blog as a small side job.

  • The trick is having a day job you really, really hate…though it is true that most people don’t realize how much work it is to consistently generate a lot of content. Hard to believe there were a couple of years in there where we wrote a dozen posts a day all by ourselves.

  • The trick is having a day job you really, really hate…though it is true that most people don’t realize how much work it is to consistently generate a lot of content. Hard to believe there were a couple of years in there where we wrote a dozen posts a day all by ourselves.

  • Oh, dear. This wasn’t the way it was supposed to play out. Remember when blogs were going to spring up as a grassroots replacement for Old Journalism? Bob Guskind’s blog, although an opinionated narrowcast around a few issues, was a sterling example of “boots on the ground” in neighborhoods (and on issues) utterly overlooked by the big guys. If blogs are indeed losing energy and eyeballs to Twitter and FB, (and they are–take it from somebody with 2 blogs), it bodes ill for the greater urban good, now that mainstream media metro coverage is a vestige and (on TV) a joke. Over the past year, I’ve started to feel that any blog post longer than a FB update will simply languish unread, and I’m sure that perception is chilling bloggers with more urgent concerns than my park walks or old-house rants. We are awash in “updates,” yet advocacy and activism have been reduced to crowdsourced nonsense like “Occupy Wall Street”–a perfect Twitterfest of earnest and incoherent slogan-babble.