BREAKING VIDEO: Occupy Wall Street Protesters Arrested For Disturbing Foreclosure Auction at Downtown Brooklyn Court House

At around 4 p.m. today, several Occupy Wall Street protesters were arrested at 360 Adams Street in Downtown Brooklyn for disturbing the proceedings of the weekly foreclosure auction with a well-rehearsed group song. Before the auction’s 3 p.m. start time, protesters were assembled outside doing their human megaphone thing. Inside, when the auction was about to start, protesters errupted into song, the first lines of which were: “Mrs. Auctioneer, All the people here, Are asking you to hold all the sales right now…” After thirty minutes or so, officers of the court warned everyone left in room that they would be arrested if they didn’t leave. The second video shows the perp walk of one of the protesters who apparently didn’t listen.

16 Comment

  • Instead of coalescing around one common cause and goal, they are becoming more disparate, unfocused and problematic.

    Other than that, it seems there are no adults in the room.

    I think even the media is getting tired of this. I know 98% of America is!!!!

    • Now there will be more time to cover the unending Republican presidential candidate debates. Please remove me from your list of 98%.

    • Uhmm….

      A national poll in Time magazine gives OWS a 54% favorable rating (exactly twice the tea party’s 27%), with 23% negative.

      The kids are on to something!

      • The Tea Party is loved; these people are, at best earnest idiots. This will be over in a few weeks. I wonder how much of “OWS” is acutally a Democrat-funded astroturf campaign.

        • So people like Lech Walesa (Nobel Peace Prize winner, announcing he’ll fly from Poland to join the protest), Joseph Stiglitz (Nobel Prize winner in Economics, who’s spoken at Zuccotti Park), and Salman Rushdie (Booker Prize winner and signer of petition in support of OWS) are earnest idiots, huh?

        • You are right that the Tea Party is loved, but this is a very easy and general statement to make. Who is it loved by – 19% of the people? Not a bad thing, but in comparison to the OWS, not so good. I cannot say whether this is a Democrat party funded initiative. It may well be. But judging from their dithering about whether to get behind it or not, I would say not. It may, in the end, though, get their funding if they fall behind the message/movement if it becomes even more popular than it apears right now.

        • You are right that the Tea Party is loved, but this is a very easy and general statement to make. Who is it loved by – 19% of the people? Not a bad thing, but in comparison to the OWS, not so good. I cannot say whether this is a Democrat party funded initiative. It may well be. But judging from their dithering about whether to get behind it or not, I would say not. It may, in the end, though, get their funding if they fall behind the message/movement if it becomes even more popular than it apears right now.

      • Time magazine is a liberal pamphlet that nobody reads. You might as well be quoting Mother Jones.

    • Dave, most protests/movements get started this way – undisciplined, maybe even chaotic. Some end up finding their voices and become powerful spokespieces for the majority of Americans who cannot express these feelings or have nothing around which to express them. When we look back on this movement years from now I think we will be better able to determine who got tired it. Realistically, though – and I am sure you were jusst making a point – I don’t think 98% – or even close to that – are tired of it. We will see how those numbers change. The media, in many cases, are just beginning to cover it.

  • I walked by at 4:10ish and never noticed a thing, or people noticing what I did not notice. And I make it a point to look around and notice.

  • Her voice is impressive. She can actually sing! Not so impressive is you holding the video camera sideways. What’s with that?

  • “until loans are modified”? Banks and loaners held accountable?
    I’m not trying to side with banks here, but isn’t at least half the problem with all these foreclosures the fault of the people that took out loans to buy houses they could in no way afford? I mean, yeah, a lot of the current trouble was cause buy the buying and selling of debts, but it shouldn’t mean that people should get to keep a house they can’t pay for.

  • Are you sure this is OWS? I thought O4O was organizing this. Those are the same folks that helped Mary Ward stay in her house. Some of them have also participated in OWS but they are not OWS.

    Dave, I like the OWS group. As I interpret it, they are asking for jobs, more affordable health insurance, more affordable education, and meaningful financial reform — such as reinstating Glass Steagall — so we don’t continue to lurch from bubble to bubble. Basically, they’re not asking for much, just a return to how things used to be in the past. These are very reasonable requests.

    It does seem like the country is going to hell. I don’t blame people who work on Wall St — they’ve seen job losses too — but the current deregulation and tax cutting policies are really putting the screws to anyone who makes less than $130,000 a year.

    And no, tax cuts are not going to bring back jobs. Unfortunately. Only demand will do that. The current policies are short sighted, and in some cases aren’t helpful to the wealthy either.

    • You’re so right, mopar. We need more regulation, like the Community Reinvestment Act, brought to us courtesy of James Earl, Bubba, and Barny Fwank. Mandating banks to make loans that poor inner-city people could never afford to pay back sounds like a stellar plan.

  • Are you sure this is OWS? I thought O4O was organizing this. Those are the same folks that helped Mary Ward stay in her house. Some of them have also participated in OWS but they are not OWS.

    Dave, I like the OWS group. As I interpret it, they are asking for jobs, more affordable health insurance, more affordable education, and meaningful financial reform — such as reinstating Glass Steagall — so we don’t continue to lurch from bubble to bubble. Basically, they’re not asking for much, just a return to how things used to be in the past. These are very reasonable requests.

    It does seem like the country is going to hell. I don’t blame people who work on Wall St — they’ve seen job losses too — but the current deregulation and tax cutting policies are really putting the screws to anyone who makes less than $130,000 a year.

    And no, tax cuts are not going to bring back jobs. Unfortunately. Only demand will do that. The current policies are short sighted, and in some cases aren’t helpful to the wealthy either.