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  • INCREDIBLE.. This is worse than what you see in third world countries like klongs (canals) in Bangkok.

  • Unlikely to be raw sewage, it’s storm runoff. It’s a tornado, so sh*t happens.

  • “Gets” nasty? Didn’t that gondola sail years ago?

  • Actually it is raw sewage. In NYC the sewers and storm drains are combined so when there is a large amount of runoff that the system can’t handle, it overflows directly into the canals/rivers.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Storm_drain#Combined_sewers

  • Meh.

    What do you expect?

    Now add 10-20 years of that since we decided Superfund is the way to go instead of local government and business route.

  • “Unlikely to be raw sewage, it’s storm runoff. It’s a tornado, so sh*t happens.”

    Yes it happens and it happened here; raw sewage combined with stormwater. NYC like many older cities have a combined storm and sanitary sewer lines.

    During rainstorms, the system can’t handle the increased flow and overflows to the rivers (called combined sewer overflows or CSOs). This is necessary, otherwise it would back up into your basements. Happens all over the City, but this one is HUGE. “Coney Island Whitefish” (i.e. condoms) are a tell tale sign of CSOs…coming from the toilets, not street drains.

  • Let’s build Luxury Condos around this.

  • I was waiting for one of the guys doing the video to do some jackass-style on camera puking.

  • “Let’s build Luxury Condos around this.”

    LMAO. As I say, I don’t know who’s paying those prices at the Satori and Third & Bond to live by the perpetual aroma of sewage and such.

  • denton, It is indeed raw sewage — one of the major perils of NYC’s combined sewage system.

    http://www.dec.ny.gov/chemical/48595.html

  • I’m searching for a place to buy, and will remember this line about the CSO next time I’m entertaining this area as a possibility:

    “They may contain high levels of suspended solids, toxic chemicals, floatable material and other pollutants that can cause the exceedance of NYS water quality standards and pose risks to human and aquatic health.”

    Pass

  • “Floatable material.”

  • “LMAO. As I say, I don’t know who’s paying those prices at the Satori and Third & Bond to live by the perpetual aroma of sewage and such.”

    You obviously have never been down around there. There’s no sewer smell from the canal. It smells like sea water and even then you have to actually stand on one of the bridges to even smell that. If if did actually smell Park Slope would be a ghetto and obviously that’s not the case.

  • Looks like Augustus Gloop’s Chocolate River! MMMMMMM….

  • Oh, and it’s STILL THERE. Walk over the Union Street bridge for an inimate view and smell.

    On hot days the Gowanus Canal notoriously stunk up the area for blocks around it. Residents of The Satori are in for some unpleasant olfactory experiences this summer while the city “fixes” the flushing tunnel. Likely for several summers.

  • Brenda, “Floatable material” literally made me happy to know that people working for the city are great copywriters who might do better in the real estate or marketing field.

  • It used to be the case that you could smell the Gowanus from several blocks, but that is simply no longer true. I think the City long ago installed some sort of pumping system that has greatly reduced the foul odor. That in itself has played a large part in that area becoming as developed as it is today.

  • Well I guess that mystery’s solved.
    Now we know where they got the term:

    “UP SHIT’S CREEK!”

  • > Now add 10-20 years of that since we decided Superfund is
    > the way to go instead of local government and business route.

    Yeah, because biz and local gov’t were really on the ball here for the last 150 years.

  • “If if did actually smell Park Slope would be a ghetto and obviously that’s not the case.”

    are you actually saying the canal doesn’t smell? now THAT”S funny

  • “There’s no sewer smell from the canal. It smells like sea water and even then you have to actually stand on one of the bridges to even smell that.”

    Sorry, but this is simply inaccurate. I live on Union street and often walk across the union street bridge to make my way over to carroll gardens. I also grew up near the water and am acquainted with with what sea water smells like. What the Gowanus is givin’ off ain’t the smell of sea water. When you’re within say 20 feet of that bridge, not to mention when you’re actually crossing it, it smells absolutely foul. I’ve crossed it many, many times and can’t recall a single time when it DID NOT smell. It’s horrendous.

  • It’s weird to be arguing about smells, but as someone who crosses the 3rd st bridge every morning and the union st bridge every evening on my way to and from work the canal is just not as bad as people on this board want it to be. Maybe you live near 3rd and Bond and are mad about construction noise (although the concrete factory is clearly the biggest noise factor on 3rd) and are trying to depress prices by talking about how bad the canal is. (or alternatively you want to buy there and are hoping to scare away other buyers)

    Yes it has a smell, some days it’s salty, some it’s oily, some it’s got a hint of sewage, but it’s never terrible except during an active CSO and the smell clears up from those very quickly.

  • jwald, that exact pumping system, which, as you say, greatly reduced the smell, HAS BEEN TURNED OFF for repairs *estimated* to take two years. Sorry for the bad news. Really, really sorry.

  • Combined Sewage Overflows (CSO’s) occur all over New York City. (Think about that next time you are Brooklyn Bridge Park.) This is the antiquated system we inherit from prior generations. There was a NYT series on this in the past year or so.

    Will it ever be changed? Its an issue of putting the $$ into infrastructure development.

    As I understand it, the repairs currently being done on the Canal’s Flushing System will reduce CSO’s by 30% when completed. It doesn’t seem like much of an improvement to me, but at least it is something.

    The canal does not smell bad very often, except on CSO days. I never smell it one block away on the Carroll Garden side.

  • When I watched this on YouTube an ad for Axe deodorant came up! Putting that smell on top of the Gowanus really would make me puke.

    I walked down 3rd Ave on Friday, and it still stank for blocks, now about a month after the tornado.

    Regarding the comment from crimsonson:

    “Now add 10-20 years of that since we decided Superfund is the way to go instead of local government and business route.”

    Wow that is ignorant! The city hasn’t been able to do anything about this for decades. Superfund is a long process, but it will complete the job and do it right, at no expense to the taxpayer. A clean, multi-use Gowanus area between Park Slope and Carroll Gardens will be one of the more interesting parts of the borough, not to mention a goldmine to property and business owners.