Rally to Save the Double-D Pool

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Yesterday public officials and area residents came out to protest the city’s recent decision to close the Douglas-Degraw (“Double-D”) pool in Gowanus as part of budget-cutting efforts. As we mentioned earlier, Gowanus would stands to be particularly hard hit, with three day care centers, one senior center, one after-school program and a health clinic all on the line. Marty Markowitz showed up to the protest, taking off his shorts to reveal swim trunks (although he kept his shirt on), and spoke on behalf of the pool closure. As the Brooklyn Paper reports, Marty didn’t have a magic solution up his sleeve to save the pool. Instead, he asked private investors to consider shelling out the $200,000 dollars the city needs to reopen Double D. While protesters questioned the need for private funding even though the pool had so much government support, it seemed like the speakers, which included Assemblywoman Joan Millman and Congresswoman Yvette Clarke as well as Council Members Steve Levin and Brad Lander, had no other solutions in the face of an upcoming $400 million budget cut. A woman speaking on behalf of Wyckoff Gardens, one of three public housing projects nearby, said to the crowd, “To make all these cuts is to act like we’re not citizens. Well, we’re citizens.”
Marty: How About Adopt-a-Pool? [The Brooklyn Paper]
Parks Department To Close Four City Pools [NY 1]
Gowanus Gutted by Budget Cuts [Brownstoner]

0 Comment

  • delepp

    This is just the tip of the iceberg. Muni finance is the next implosion, it will be slow and painful. Underfunded pension obligations, wacky return expectations and dwindiling tax base.

  • I have no faith in this state’s govt to come up with simple, even temporary, solutions. Why not sell a summer consession? Why not charge $2 fee? So dumb to cut these not-that-expensive resources in this area.

  • always a bad idea to take away city public pools. you are essentially shooting yourself in the foot. which is exactly what will happen (you will be shot in the foot. or face!) when the little hoodrats have nothing to do and no where to do this summer.

    *rob*

  • I commend people for trying to save the pool but relative to the importance of the three day care centers and an afterschool program and a health clinic, am I the only one who thinks there are a few more important public services that should be saved before we worry about a pool?

  • I commend people for trying to save the pool but relative to the importance of the three day care centers and an afterschool program and a health clinic, am I the only one who thinks there are a few more important public services that should be saved before we worry about a pool?

  • I don’t know. That pool serves a large group of kids that live in public housing. If you don’t give kids something to do, they’ll think of things to do on their own. And you know what happens when you let kids think on their own…

    Also, there are people — many of the same people — working to stop the closures of the day care and senior centers as well. Just bcs you’re for the pool doesn’t mean you’re not for the other issues.

  • Bkhabitant – I see your point, but it’s unlikely there will ever be enough money to adequately provide social services, so what is the justification for any city funding of ‘extras’ like parks, museums, etc?

  • Sparafucile, I agree with you – there will never be enough money for everything, but if I had to choose between saving some afterschool programs/day care programs that provide structure, supervision and education for the youth in the area or a swimming pool, I don’t think the debate is close in my mind. Ringo makes a good point that we need to provide positive outlets for kids in the neighborhood, but I would argue the other programs do what a pool can do and more, though maybe the pool serves a wider population base (and so can see an argument there).