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  • Wow, that’s wide!

  • Its a two way bike lane AND a 3 ft buffer. then parking then 2 lanes for driving then another for parking. Lights are up now lets see if the bikers obey or lets see how many people/carriages/dogs get hit by bikers not paying attention to the lights…

  • Love it. Now maybe they can get rid of the cars in the park.

  • Pretty exciting… I don’t think you have to worry about the bikes as much as these people/carriages/dogs standing IN the bike lane and/or buffer stripes INSTEAD of WHERE THEY SHOULD BE waiting… i.e., on the sidewalk.

    I’ve recently almost hit 3 stupid women as I’m turning right IN MY CAR. Just walzing out in the road…. without looking… because, obviously, you wait to cross the street IN THE ROAD and not on the sidewalk.

    Just sayin’

  • woohoo! This is so great. Long overdue! I think this will only make this world class park even better and finally, we’ll be able to bike to the north end of park slope without being a. run down on 8th avenue, b. riding on sidewalk, or c. going the wrong way on the park drive.

  • we also desperately need a stroller lane and a scooter lane as well as a fast walker lane.
    But in the end, this is Brooklyn so people will continue doing whatever the hell they feel like and will continue to yell at, and complain about, each other.

  • denton

    What will really be fun is seeing what all the cars do that drive to the Greenmarket on the weekend (now _that’s_ green). They’ll probably think the bike lane is a big parking lot.

  • quote:
    Pretty exciting… I don’t think you have to worry about the bikes as much as these people/carriages/dogs standing IN the bike lane and/or buffer stripes INSTEAD of WHERE THEY SHOULD BE waiting… i.e., on the sidewalk.

    excuse me, but feet trumps ALL. people can stand wherever they please.

    *rob*

  • I think this is great. I didn’t realize they were also doing the buffer to keep bicyclists from being doored by cars in the parking lane.

  • Rob — I have no problem with that…. just don’t sue me when I crush you and your baby standing in the middle of the road.

  • And finally NYC enters the 21st Century with regard to bike culture.

    Love this.

    Denton, I think they’ll be adding another lane to divide the bike lane in 2 and also adding those plastic barrier things, so no car is going to mistake this for a parking lane when it’s complete.

    This is actually really thoughtfully designed.

  • Sounds from all your rants that you’re just not a very good driver, tybur. ;-)

  • Apparently, the bike lane is being rolled out on a provisional basis. If it gets a lot of use, it will stay. If it isn’t, then Marty Markowitz gets his parking spaces back.

    So, ride your bike!!!

    Agree with commenters above who say next step is doing something about what goes on in the park. Between cars and meander-thals and NYPD who could care less, it’s a war on cyclists in there. Never seen so much road space so poorly used.

  • Awesome! That parking lane looks like it will do wonders to stop the car service drivers from driving in the bike lane too. And here’s another vote for getting cars out of the park!

  • I know ‘stoner isn’t a bikelane forum, but if the eyes are on the page anyway this was in my mailbox today:

    In regards to the condition of the pavement on Ocean Parkway, west of Park Circle, please be advised that we anticipate refurbishing Park Circle in 2011. Also, bicycle guide signs will soon be installed on Ocean Parkway to indicate the transition from the bicycle lane to the separated bicycle path. [ed. note: that's the beatup pavement in the bikelane part of the circle he's talking about. Only in NY does the circle get refurbished 1 year after it was built]

    The eastbound bicycle lane on Caton Avenue was recently restored between McDonald Avenue and Ocean Parkway and DOT is in the process of relocating the correspnding westbound lane onto Fort Hamilton Parkway, one block to the north. This is in response to community complaints about the tightness of the previous design for bicycles, cars and buses.

    Splitting the east and westbound bicycle lanes between Caton Avenue and Fort Hamilton Parkway will create a safer situation for all road users by better separating cyclists from moving vehicular traffic on Caton Avenue. This reconfiguration will also allow for wider parking lanes, which will better prevent cyclists from being hit by car doors.

    Finally, regarding the removal of the Bedford Avenue bicycle lane, DOT upgraded and made improvements to the parallel Kent Avenue by implementing a parking protected two-way bicycle facility from Clymer Street to North 14th Street. These improvements better meet the loading and parking needs of the local businesses and residents, and provides a safer route for cyclists traveling north through Williamsburg and Greenpoint, Brooklyn.

    Thank you for your interest in the safety of Brooklyn’s streets.

    Joseph Palmieri

    Borough Commissioner

  • tybur…exactly. i hope to be riding on your wheel when it happens.

  • Funny etson… I exaggerate when I say “almost hit” — but these stupid people REGULARLY just step into the road and stand there. If they lose a foot, I don’t fee I should be responsible. Wait on the goddamn sidewalk… cars can turn (and get out of your way) faster and there’s less chance of splattering your baby on the pavement.

    That being said… these stupid people are actually piss me off more when I’m a pedestrian. Standing on Lexington Avenue in Manhattan during rush hour… there’s NO CHANCE of crossing until the light changes. BUT, lo and behold, stupid jerky has to wait IN FRONT OF ME in the road — and guess what, he/she then (more often than not) proceeds to walk slower than me a blocks my path. Aaaargh!

  • denton

    “Sounds from all your rants that you’re just not a very good driver, tybur.”

    look who’s taking, etson, you can’t even drive on the right side of the road!

  • morralkan

    Pardon me, but why are bike lanes needed at all on Prospect Park West when there is a REALLY wide bike / runner / walker lane just inside the park? OK, there are times when cars are permitted to drive inside the park, but really, isn’t there quite enough room to ride your bike INSIDE the park already?

    And, yes, I am an avid bicyclist and have been riding my bike in this area for the past 40 years or so. Talk about a huge waste of money in tight economic times! Almost as bad as the idiotic idea of making a pedestrian mall / table and chair arrangement on 14th St when Union Square Park is adjacent to the planned project. I don’t drive at all, so it’s not as if I would personally benefit from more lanes for vehicular traffic. Still, I doubt that we can really go back to the horse and buggy age, as delightful as that was. (Diptheria, polio, smallpox, measles, and whooping cough were also a real blast.)

  • But I have obtained drivers licenses in *three* countries (so far), Denton.

  • all the people on this string talking about getting impatient with strollers or slow walkers or whatever… SLOW DOWN. CHILL. BE FRIENDLY. LOOK OUT FOR PEOPLE. BE KIND TO PEDESTRIANS WHEN YOU’RE IN A CAR, ON A BIKE, OR JUST WALKING FAST. SLOW DOWN BROOKLYN, BE SAFE.

  • In regard to all bike lane posts it should always be stated:
    Commuting by bicycle is an alternative available to some people some of the year not an option for all people all year round.
    The only reason a small percentage of cycling commuters ever got this much power was because the DOT Commissioner is an out of touch elitist just like our mayor. Hopefully when she is gone we can go back to normal.

    “feet trumps ALL. people can stand wherever they please.”
    Yes pedestrians have the right of way, but that doesn’t mean they can stand where they please. You can contribute to someone else’s negligence.

    “And finally NYC enters the 21st Century with regard to bike culture.”
    Just because the paths are there doesn’t mean the culture has changed. One part of our culture that has changed is all the whining about how bicycling in the city isn’t safe and we need bike lanes. It’s as if New York has been taken over by whining, suburban, helicopter Moms.

    Now, instead of cars going too fast along PPW they will now drive more aggressively and lane change more to jockey for position. I can’t imagine the resulting congestion is going to make the residents any happier. But at least now people can ride in the street instead of in the park.

  • morralkan-Try riding from 12th and PPW to the GAP greenmarket. It’s almost impossible.

    Bike traffic inside the park runs in one direction (counterclockwise). There can be 5 blocks between park exits. To get in and out you have to ride on a pedestrian pathway.

  • morralkan… I think many of us were waiting for this comment.

    (1) The Park Drive is ONE-WAY. Only counter-clockwise. This is actually enforced for some retarded reason… even when the road is closed to traffic. I think it would be AWESOME if the road was closed to all cars and they made it a two-way ring road. But they’re not gonna do it.

    (2) This project was as much for *TRAFFIC CALMING* as it was for a bike lane… This road is treated like the Indy 500… it’s truly crazy how fast cars drive down this road… maybe 60+ mph. I’ve never witnessed a traffic ticket. Take a lane away and traffic slows down. Mechanical intervention to mitigate the lack of ANY traffic enforcement.

    (3) Because of the Indy 500 effect… biking down this road was frightening.

    (4) Paint striping and some plastic bollards costs almost nothing. This is a seriously cheap DOT project with A LOT of benefits.

  • Someguy…you’re that troll who shows up on streetsblog, aren’t you?

  • If you want to see bike culture done right, go to Berlin.

    I just got back and think I wanna move there.

  • PS: A hearty welcome back to 11217!

  • Someguy — Did you miss that they studied the traffic volume of PPW? Oh, yeah, and did you miss that “jockeying for position” happened when it was 3 huge lanes too? The only difference was that it was at 50+ mph.

  • Thanks Ditmas.

    I was just in Berlin myself. :)

    Although I had NO desire to live there. Liked it a lot, but definitely not a place I’d want to live.

  • Great! Now what about the rest of the streets that border Prospect Park. PPSW is begging for a bike lane.

    It is about time that public space is equally divided among all modes of transport. I walk and bike as much as possible and I am more than willing to share the road; I just wish car drivers would do the same.

    Car drivers do not have a divine right to forward progress; In fact most traffic laws are geared to slow down or stop traffic. Slow down and stop every once in a while. Be that guy who stops to let a family cross the street safely. If you think you can get anywhere faster in Brooklyn by speeding around you really are an idi*t.

  • Totally Stupid, just ban cars from the park and make the park “2 lanes”.

  • “Just because the paths are there doesn’t mean the culture has changed.”

    *
    DOT announced a 35 percent increase in commuter cycling. Overall, cycling in the city has doubled in the past six years.

    *
    Bicycles are on the rise in New York City, where more and more people are making bikes a major part of their transportation diet. City officials say it’s the fastest-growing mode of transport.

    “The number of cyclists has jumped by 80 percent in the past decade — to 185,000 among the more than 8 million city denizens.

    City officials say they’ve worked to make the city more biker friendly. They note the hundreds of miles of marked bike paths created in recent years, safety awareness campaigns and handouts of free helmets to unprotected cyclists.”

    Bicycle accidents have decreased as the amount of bikers increased, according to officials. Over the same amount og time, accidents have dropped by nearly 40%.

  • No Tyburg6, I did not. Do you really think people livery cars, cabs and everyoneelse will go slower because there are less lanes? Or that they won’t weave in and out of lanes to go around slower cars?
    50 mph+ really? I drive it all the time and there simply aren’t enough green lights in row to go that fast.
    As for being a troll on streetsblog: Trolling (as I understand it) is trying to elicit a response, my posts are responses. They may be inflammatory but they are truly how I feel. Just because I am passionate about an issue and fall on the other side of it than most of Brownstoner’s commenters does not make me a troll. And it doesn’t make me wrong because I disagree with you.

  • 185,000 cyclists.
    8,000,000 commuters.
    looking at these numbers, I am left with one question. How much of a say do you think you should have?

  • dittoburg

    So when are they going to ban all vehicles, bikes and cars, from parks. The sooner the better.

  • ***Pardon me, but why are bike lanes needed at all on Prospect Park West when there is a REALLY wide bike / runner / walker lane just inside the park?***

    The bike path inside the park is one-way. Prior to this bike lane there was no good, safe way for cyclists to travel northbound along the PPW / 8th Avenue corridor aside from riding on the PPW sidewalk, which pedestrians do not appreciate. Now you can bike from Windsor Terrace to go shopping or drop your kid off at school in Park Slope. If it works, that means less traffic. Less cruising for parking. I think that’s fantastic.

    *** Talk about a huge waste of money in tight economic times!***

    The cost of this project is negligible. It’s not even a capital project. It’s just a “signs and markings” project. It barely rates as a budget line item. And if it doesn’t work, PPW can quickly and cheaply be restored to the mini-superhighway that you seem to want it to remain.

    ***I doubt that we can really go back to the horse and buggy age, as delightful as that was. (Diptheria, polio, smallpox, measles, and whooping cough were also a real blast.)***

    Are you f’ing kidding? If anything, the automobile is 21st century NYC as polio and whooping cough was to 19th century NYC. Likewise, the progressive reform movement that is making NYC more bikeable and less automobile-dependent is the direct descendant of the progressive reform movement that brought public health, safety and sanitation to NYC 110 years ago. You need to go visit a city like Paris, Berlin, Copenhagen or Portland, Oregon and let us know if you think those cities’ bikes and street car systems are dragging them back into the 19th century or pushing forward into the 21st. Those cities transportation systems make NYC look downright Third World.

  • Further diminishing the utility of the park bike line is the fact that it’s closed from 1am to 6am.

    Also neither 8th Ave, 7th ave, or 6th ave in Park Slope have bike lanes. Installing one on heavily trafficked and narrow 7th ave is unlikely.
    In fact PPW is the only avenue between 4th ave and the park that had 3 lanes of one-way traffic. 8th ave only has two lanes, but no one complained about them not being enough. Now both 8th ave and PPW have the same amount of lanes.
    The nytimes recently published an article about a study detailing the methods that NYers chose to commute to work. Unfortunately, according to this study very few New Yorkers use a bicycle to get to work – under 1%. A shocking 21% drive alone to get to work.
    Some would interpret these statistics as proof that bike lanes cater to very few. I see them as proof that we can do more to approach cities like Copenhagen, where 50% use bikes to get to work.

  • Your logic is really flawed, someguy.

    Are you suggesting that the remaining 7,815,000 own cars?

    And bicyclists should (and do) have a large say because they are much more eco-friendly than your oil guzzling tank which may have just ruined the Gulf of Mexico for all eternity.

  • And for the record, the 185,000 was in 2008 and biking skyrocketed another 80% in 2009.

    Latest figures (now half way through 2010) I’ve heard are 400,000 daily commuters on bicycle.

  • 8,000,000 commuters. read the post. All I am saying is get a grip on yourselves.

  • Someguy — NO, I think livery and cabs will go slower because there is a car IN FRONT OF THEM and they can’t get around them. With the previous 3-wide-line road, cars could go crazy.

    And YES… cars do drive 50+ mph on PPW. If I’m driving (too fast, really) at 40 mph down PPW and someone in suped up Acura blows by me… how fast is he going? 42 mph?

    I truly hope this bike lane causes you personal problems. :-)

  • Most NYC commuters ride the subway, someguy.

    You’re the one coming to a post about a new bike lane whining about the poor car drivers of the city. Seems to me you’re the one who needs to get a grip. Your posts come across really desperate.

  • 11217 – did you ever end up getting a bike? i recall you were considering it

  • NYC has always been plenty bikeable. Bikes can and should go anywhere cars can except limited access highways. These bike lanes are really just a way to score anti-car political points. I am completely baffled by the idea that any bicyclist over the age of eight would have trouble sharing road space with other vehicles.

  • ” I am completely baffled by the idea that any bicyclist over the age of eight would have trouble sharing road space with other vehicles.”

    I think you got that last sentence a tad bit twisted ma

  • Hallelujah! Suck it, Marty!

  • “morralkan-Try riding from 12th and PPW to the GAP greenmarket. It’s almost impossible.”

    Downhill on 11th or 13th Street, right onto 8th Avenue, and another right up Union Street should do the trick.

  • They should put a bike lane on the Gownanus Expressway.

  • dittoburg

    Expert, is your partner denying you masked backdoor sex?
    Dr. Freud.

  • dittoburg

    In any event, it is entirely appropriate that on graduation day an asshat has a gownanus.

  • ooops!

    Well, it is an expressway.

  • nice 11217! happy riding!

  • What’s elitist about bicycling? Even a really nice bike costs a small fraction of what a car costs. Aren’t those who would prioritize the needs/wants of drivers the elitists?

    Or is it elitist to be in good enough physical shape to ride a bike? Would it be more populist to assume that the poor are not well-served by additional opportunities for lowe-cost fitness and recreation?

    Someone, please explain.

  • bmfsq

    The bike lanes should not be put on main thoroughfares, rather lesser traveled ones. And if it is illegal for a car to be in a bike lane, should it be the same for bikers in car lanes?

    Has anyone ever tried to drive on Union St as bikers struggle up the hill, wobbling between a row of parked cars and ones in traffic.

  • “What’s elitist about bicycling?”

    Drivers seem to think somehow they are the only ones who pay for the infrastructure in NYC (through registration fees and whatever else they need to pay to drive) and therefore are entitled to drive 60mph down residential streets without being bother by pesky hipsters pedaling around on toys.

    Oh, and don’t forget everyone on a bike runs red lights and rides on sidewalks.

  • Ilovebrooklyn:

    Neantherthals have decided that those who do things which are easy on the earth are elitists.

    You know…cause they think climate change is a bunch of malarkey.

  • “Oh, and don’t forget everyone on a bike runs red lights and rides on sidewalks.”

    dh, now your getting it ;-)

  • “And if it is illegal for a car to be in a bike lane, should it be the same for bikers in car lanes?”

    It is. Bottom line is there isn’t enough enforcement of traffic regulations of both drivers and cyclists. It seems all traffic cops do is drive around and ticket UPS trucks.

  • “dh, now your getting it ;-)

    haha! if i’m gonna be accused of it, might as well do it!!

  • This is getting tiresome. Maybe you all would prefer I agree with you but I don’t. My gas guzzling tank? My whining? Hoping the bike lane causes me problems?
    Who exactly is whining here? Maybe your still upset about something someone else did to you but none of my arguments are invalid.
    My point about PPW (in case I wasn’t clear) is that when there is an opportunity to drive fast on any road about half of us will drive faster. Having less lanes does’t slow a driver down if there is no one in front of them. So we’re both only half right.
    Statistically, bikers are still a small minority albeit a green one. Allowances for bike commuting should be made but I think the righteousness is starting to get to some people’s heads. It’s a big city and 400,000 cyclist out of 8,000,000 comuters is still a very small percentage.
    For the record I am not a bike basher, I think the city should have places for bikes to lock up all over midtown, I think that you shouldn’t be allowed to drive to work in Manhattan by yourself or at all unless you can prove the need for it.
    Even if there were the same amount of bike lanes and bike consideration that exists in Copenhagen, Portland and Amsterdam there would not be the same amount of cyclists due to the large area of the city and the weather.
    What kinds of restrictions on cars would you like to see? No more cars at all? Are hybrids OK? Truck deliveries? I am curious to see where we would end up.

  • I love this! Now everyone can be safer on the road whether you are on a bicycle or in a car. I think the buffer is a great idea because no biker likes the thought of unexpectedly being hit by a car door. Changes like these are what make commuting in a big city enjoyable. But what’s even better is if I win the year of FREE commuting that I just entered at http://www.commuternation.com. It would be great if all of a sudden my commute changed to being very safe and totally free!

  • 8th ave becomes extremely narrow towards Union. There is heavier car traffic there because of folks driving towards Grand Army and Eastern Parkway. The result is that cyclists have very little room to maneuver between traffic and parked cars. The danger of being doored also increases.

    Remember also that because of the geography of the park, cyclists wanting to travel from the south center of the park (say, Windsor Terrace around Terrace Place or so) to the north center (Vanderbilt and prospect heights) must go all the way around to the west side or the east side. The new bike lane saves them from the added inconvenience of having to bike down to 8th ave, an additional avenue west of their intended direction.

    In addition the new lane provides a safe way for novice cyclists to try biking in the park without having to complete the entire loop and its steep incline on the eastern side.

  • “Downhill on 11th or 13th Street, right onto 8th Avenue, and another right up Union Street should do the trick.”

    No bike lanes any of those roads, which was the point.

    “I am completely baffled by the idea that any bicyclist over the age of eight would have trouble sharing road space with other vehicles.”

    Yeah, that’s really a tough one. I mean, it’s not like anyone’s been killed in an accident or anything.

    Sparafucile…if you’re going to be a moron, at least be funny.

  • Someguy…So it appears some of your views are reasonable. So why rant and rave about yuppies and bikes and greemarkets and trust funds etc? (Since you didn’t deny that you are the troll of streetsblog, I’m assuming you are.)

    Unless it’s too get others spun up and wasting their time commenting instead of working or whatever. Which is kind of why I’m here. :-)

  • dittoburg

    I though it was the Segway that was going to change the face of cities forever and usher in a new epoch.
    Turns out it was the bike.

  • People, people. This bike lane is a beautiful thing. Period. Safer, slower car traffic. More folks on bikes, saving the earth and their health with each turn of the pedal.

    bmfesq & dirty hipster: There is no such thing as a “car lane.” It is share and share alike out there. A bike is legally able to go anywhere a car can unless otherwise posted or insanely dangerous. The Vehicle and Traffic Law of New York State section 1231 says, “Bicyclists are granted all of the rights and are subject to all of the duties of the driver of a motor vehicle.” That means, yes, a bike can claim a spot in the main roadway if that’s the only place for the bike.

    someguy: Your first post was totally sexist. I’d like to “helicopter mother” your you-know-what for all the hooey you’ve been spewing this afternoon. I’m not impressed by your statistics. It’s time for a change. What’s the point of spouting old data?

  • pushystrollermom – i agree with everything you said. I don’t believe i said anything to the contrary.

  • Pushystrollermom, I’d like to apologize for being sexist. You are right, I should have said helicopter parenting.
    Contrary to your opinion I don’t believe I have been spewing “hooey” all day long. My opinions are as valid as the rest.
    fuplease, yes I have commented maybe 10 times at THE MOST on streets blog. You’ve got a good eye for recognizing my rant style. I guess I rant and rave because I feel strongly about these issues, and even if I agree with them in principle I find the lack of open-mindedness stupid. So I take the extreme.
    BTW- Is it trolling if I am contributing a contrary opinion to the mainstream (every time I comment). I don’t see the point to commenting when all you are doing is agreeing.

  • morralkan

    To Fuplease, et al

    Yes, the bike lanes in the park are one way. Big deal – advocate for splitting then and making them TWO way. Having to go FIVE whole blocks to another exit doesn’t seem like a great distance to such an avid biker. (I ride from Crown Hts to Bay Ridge to get a haircut.) I’m sure the entrance/exit problem could also be easily solved.

    Also, as others have pointed out, bikes are allowed to go virtually everyplace that cars can go, so ride on 8th Ave, 7th Ave, etc. The point I was making was that I have biked all of these streets without specifically-marked bike lanes and I’m pretty sure you can do so also.

    Just because you want to ride a bike (which I also do on a nearly daily basis) doesn’t mean that other, who perhaps are not physically able to do so, might not need to drive a car or take a taxi.

    As to the park being closed between 1 and 6, for chrissake, how much auto traffic do you generally encounter along PPW during those hours?

    I’ve spent time in Germany and Paris. In many German towns, bikes share the sidewalks with pedestrians (in marked lanes).

  • Looks like a great way to safeguard bike traffic. In Beijing this the norm. Too bad it’s not two-way on this particular stretch, but I’m sure it will be used as such.

  • I live near PPW and I think the primary concern ought to be traffic calming, as many vehicles travel entirely too fast on the street. My belief is that eliminating a lane of traffic will be beneficial in that regard, since there simply will be less room to pass and weave in and out.

  • I ride just about every day, often 20 or more miles at a time. A small percentage of my rides are inside of a bike lane, possibly less than 5% of my total distance is done in a designated lane.

    Do I like bike lanes? Not especially. They’re nice to have, sure, but I don’t think they are necessary. I’ve never thought this area could really use a dedicated bike lane and I didn’t cry over the loss on Bedford. (The one on Kent is so much better!)

    With all these infrastructure changes to accommodate cyclists, I feel like there needs to be a campaign towards educating cyclists on how to ride defensively and appropriately on the road. I can’t tolerate “bike salmon” riding the wrong way down a one way street, red light runners, and any other cyclist who has a disregard for the rules of the road.

    I feel that if bikes are to have the same rights as cars, they need to act like cars. There are far too many wishy-washy fair-weather cyclists clogging up the roads, posing a danger to themselves and traffic as well. You can’t just cruise up on the sidewalk, dart between parked cars, or go North on 2nd Ave. Yeah, NYC has a ton of bad drivers, but I see more cyclists behaving badly than I do cars.

    All I have to say is, respect the road and it will respect you. I don’t have a negative attitude towards cars and I’m not an evangelical cyclist. I just like to ride my bike where I please and do it as safely as possible. If you feel uncomfortable riding through a certain area, take some time to map a route that will fit your comfort level better. We can do without many of the bike lanes as long as we show a little responsibility on our part. In the thousands of miles that I have logged in the five boros, I’ve had maybe 10 close calls. It is all about being alert and making yourself visible.

  • “Even if there were the same amount of bike lanes and bike consideration that exists in Copenhagen, Portland and Amsterdam there would not be the same amount of cyclists due to the large area of the city and the weather. ”

    maybe people would ride greater distances if there were great bike lanes…exactly like in the places you’ve mentioned. In amsterdam people regularly ride a 30 minute distance to work…i would too if i didnt have to worry about dying along the way. And much like these places NYC is fairly flat making for easy pedaling. Maybe all these great bikes lanes are why i didnt see too many overweight people in amsterdam & copenhagen or why denmark is considered the happiest country. Truly a model for NYC to strive for in more ways than one.

  • Cumberland Yo

    YES YES YES

    BIKEZ69696969