Carlton Avenue Bridge Could Be Closed for Four More Years

carlton-avenue-bridge-0109.jpg
DOT cut a much more generous deal with Forest City than was initially made public and ESDC perpetuated the myth to the appelate court, according to a fascinating and detailed expose yesterday on the Atlantic Yards Report. ESDC first told the public in 2007′s Final Environmental Impact Statement that the bridge would be closed for two years. A Freedom of Information Act request by AY Report’s Norman Oder, however, revealed that Forest City has three years to complete the project with another two years tacked on in the case of an “unavoidable delay.” “The reconstruction of the bridge was not necessary,” Council Member Letitia James said. “Governor Paterson should return the bridge to a state of good repair and reopen it immediately to the community.”
Contract Gives FCR Three Years (And Maybe More) [AY Report]
Photo by Tracy Collins

0 Comment

  • Ranter lied about somenthing? Quelle #$%#$ing surpise!

  • This is a real screw job – two years to build an overpass was riduculous to begin with and they should either force him to do it or do it and put a lien on the property.

  • …case of an “unavoidable delay.” – like endless lawsuits?

  • I’m pretty sure none of the lawsuits include a stop work order on rebuilding that bridge. Find a new scapegoat. -like incompetent businessmen?

  • How about incompetent businessmen and stupid City/state officials who subsidize them? Let’s also point out the presentation of a project that seems to be such a turnoff that the aforementioned stupid businessman can’t even sign up a major tenant.

  • As a Carlton Ave dweller, I don’t really mind this–it keeps the thru traffic on our street to a minimum!

  • Argh!

    I mean, since I walk or ride *around* the non-bridge (How much do I love crossing Atlantic at Vanderibilt instead?) about twice a week, it wasn’t a secret to me that it was going to be gone for a lot more than two years, but the missing bridge is a MAJOR inconvenience.

    For bonus fun, I was nearly mugged last winter just after the bridge closed when I headed out to walk over it, not realizing I was going to be walking through a long dark block of warehouses instead. Lucky for me I was just furious enough about the whole thing (it was snowing, too. Grrrr.) that when the group of teenagers surrounded me and asked me for the time I just flipped out and started yelling at them (I think I said something like “oh no way. No fu…ing way. It is snowing, I am walking home, the damn bridge is gone and now you think you are going to mug me? F… you. No way, I do not have time for this, too.” and they told me I was crazy.

    They might be right.

    Anyway, it is a huge problem that the bridge is gone. It isn’t safe and it really does cut off the neighborhoods that used to be connected by the bridge.

  • as someone who lives nearby as well, i don’t mind the reduced traffic but i’d like to be able to use carlton to get to ft. greene myself (on foot). i don’t have time to read the AY report, but i’m a little confused about this post. are you saying that they projected they’d be done in two years but the deal allows them five? sorry, but i don’t find that particularly surprising or controversial. disappointing, yes. scandalous? no.

  • nice work anti-AY crew. thanks for saving brooklyn. keep up that meritless litigation and make us proud!

  • i disagree -

    I feel the same way. The reduced traffic down carlton is surely nice, but on the weekends when i want to take a stroll to FG, its sort of annoying to walk down to Bergen and take the 6th Ave Bridge.

  • “Lucky for me I was just furious enough about the whole thing (it was snowing, too. Grrrr.) that when the group of teenagers surrounded me and asked me for the time I just flipped out and started yelling at them (I think I said something like “oh no way. No fu…ing way. It is snowing, I am walking home, the damn bridge is gone and now you think you are going to mug me? F… you. No way, I do not have time for this, too.”

    You should be glad that this inconvenience taught you how to handle yourself in the big city! Always remember – punks don’t hassle people who they think will fight back.

  • East New York, except for the requisite four year stint in a college town, I’ve never lived anywhere but the big city.

    And, i disagree, the point is that the DOT and the ESDC actually testified that it would be closed for two years. The environmental review process might be a great festival of political farce and obfuscation, but you aren’t supposed to just lie outright.

  • what testimony are you talking about? link doesn’t contain any testimony. i get the point you’re making, it’s just a silly and unsupported one. not even oder’s link can sustain it. you can’t point to any promise for a two year closure anywhere, and neither did oder. i’m sure that everyone aspired to have it closed for only two years at the time they submitted those documents. what is the implication, that FCR wanted it to take longer but lied? sorry conspiracy theorists, but that makes no sense. nobody has pointed to any reason known at the time that it couldn’t have been done in the time period. as for oder’s “unanswered questions,” give me a break. you actually need someone to announce that a project like this might not get done in the aspirational, probabilistic timetable a developer announces? that makes you seem like children, really.

    AY-haters, these kind of made-up tempests are silly, and they erode the power of your more rational arguments.

  • Serpentor, your story can’t be true. The anti-AY camp has assured us that life in the footprint is pure bliss and that any assertions of crime are fabricated by Ratner’s paid PR flacks.

  • The loss of the bridge has been a burden on us. I would walk across that bridge from Fort Greene to Park Slope a number of times each week, especially on the weekend.

    I spoke out against this and the supposed “two-year” closure and reconstruction timeframe from the get-go. And, I figured the bridge would be closed for many, many years…

    Yes, it does seem to have quieted the traffic on Carlton a bit in Fort Greene, of course, but it has shuttled that vehicular traffic to Vanderbilt and is a real inconvenience to pedestrians.

    It really does feel, as many pointed out, that it basically cut the neighborhoods of Fort Green and Prospect Heights off from each other.

    The distance from Vanderbilt to 6th Avenue is very far on foot. That is one long mega-block. I would not walk up to Vanderbilt to then walk to Grand Army Plaza, get mugged, and then walk all the way down to 7th Avenue to do some shopping…just seems like a huge, rather bleak (at moments along the walk) route.

    But frankly, I also do not love walking from Fort Greene across to 6th Avenue and up through PS because you end up walking downhill in FG and then way up hill to get to 7th Avenue in Park Slope instead of staying on a very slow slope going along Carlton to Flatbush as you would if the bridge were in place.

    I do walk the 6th Avenue route right now but I have to say 6th Avenue seems much more a place to get mugged than 7th quite frankly. There are long blocks of 6th that seem absolutely deserted at many times of day and on the weekend. I have heard of more muggings on 6th compared to 7th as well. Who knows…just doesn’t add to feelings of safety, especially irksome because it is a longer, inconvenient route compared to walking the now-gone Carlton Bridge.

    I should add, they closed the bridge last year way before it was necessary. It just sat there with barricades and nothing going on except what seemed like parking for the developer.