Brooklyn Bridge Park Plans Doomed?

bbp-piers23-03-2008.jpg
The DEC is calling the current iteration of Brooklyn Bridge Park plans unacceptable, according to an article in today’s Post, which is almost certainly going to mean further delays for the two-decades-in-the-making project and send its budget soaring. The DEC says the plan, which calls for 12 acres of waterfront being set aside for water sports uses and a marina, may harm marine life and the agency won’t issue a permit for the massive overhaul. Even without a redesign, Brooklyn Bridge Park costs are expected to be at least double the $150 million now budgeted for the project, according to Parks Commissioner Adrian Benepe. BBP foe Judi Francis says she’s not shocked by the news. “This plan has been bungled for so long that we shouldn’t be surprised that what this park is being promoted as – a park for beginning boaters – is in peril,” said Francis.
B’klyn Row a No-Go [NY Post]
Brooklyn Bridge Park: It’s a Go! [Brownstoner]
Drawing of plans for piers 2 and 3 from BBP Conservancy.

0 Comment

  • it’s all going to wash away anyways…

  • i just knew that the tether ball and model car racing would screw up this deal.

  • This is completely absurd. Boats might harm marine life? It used to be a port!

  • The yacht and motorboat facilities are fine, but the canoes and kayaks are going to screw up the ecosystem? Give me a break!

    The DEC has this one back asswards.

  • May I make a modest proposal?
    What the community really really needs is parking. Re-open the huge parking lot and give Cobble Hill and Brooklyn Heights residents first dibs at monthly rates.
    That would be a useful and community-minded gesture on the part of the pols and city officials. I for one would vote for anyone sensible enough to approach this in a new way. The current plans are stuck on stupid and have been stuck on stupid for about ten years.

  • has anyone actually read the article?
    they have to put wave and current altering systems in place to have a marina for small boats and kayaks etc (something not needed for large barges that would’ve docked there a long time ago).

    how can you not think that would affect marine life?

  • honestly, get rid of all the boat crap. a marina is the most un-democratic use of space, the most expensive and doesn’t generate the money they propose. dump all that, and the kayaks. More green spaces. Done.

  • Nothing but green spaces would be fine.

  • Nothing but green space would be useless about 300 days a year.

  • Nothing but green space would be used 365 days a year. Anyone think we should pave over Central and Prospect Parks because they are “underutilized” on certain cold winter days?

  • If you think Cantral Park is nothing but green space you are mentally damaged.

  • How about forcing Elizabeth Stribling to live there while it is all a big parking lot-desolate warehouse wasteland.

  • 11:07… OK, the parts that are, then. Parking lot in Sheep Meadow, anyone? No? But it’s cold out and nobody’s there! Long Meadow in Prospect Park–totally useless most of the time. New York could use another airport–seems like a good spot for one!

  • Anyone know the source of the pics in that article? They’re much more detailed than anything I’ve seen before.

  • Prospect Park is used all year and is 95% green space. BBP has an ice rink and other all-season areas. Dump the marina!

  • Take a closer look at the plans. The Marina is actually all in the water and takes up minimal land area. It’s not like it’s a choice between green space and a marina. It’s a choice between a Marina and open water. So the marina is not “undemocratic” because it’s not really taking land that would otherwise be used by the many and designating it for the few, it’s taking land that would otherwise not be used at all and providing a service for the few that will also activate the park and also add to the maritime feel of the park, which is one of it’s main features.

  • yes, but they want to take away land area from park use and give it to private use in order to subsidize the marina

  • It is a mistake to make a park down here at all. This land should be sold to the highest bidder and developed for tax-generating purposes. We cannot take care of the parks we already have. Only a private developer will be able to untangle the regs and strictures of the site and actually create something worth having. The governemnt is hopeless at this as evidenced at every turn so far in the saga of this fiasco-boondoggle.

  • marina is costing an enormous about of money. at the expense of other things

  • 1:19 and 3:07 – The marina is NOT being subsidized. The private development is supporting the operating and maintenance budget of the park, not the marina.

  • This park is going nowhere, now that Spitzer is toast

  • 3:36, you said it.
    Spitzer is toast on a stick.
    The plans for the park are even further dowm the toilet than they were before.
    Sell the damn lots to developers and be done with it. Use the revenues to restore the Empire Stores. I am tired of looking at abandoned pier sheds and empty parking lots (while frantically looking for a place to park).
    I like the idea of keeping a part of it as a community parking lot, that would be a really useful public amenity. Who gives a rat’s ass about kayaks. You wanna kayak? go to Florida.
    The whole situation is a prime example of a
    typical New York State, no can do, screw-up.

  • Absolutely right… this won’t happen. What a pathetic waste of millions already spent.

  • denton

    Geez. Spend a million to cover it all with grass, like Flushing Meadow. Set up some bbq grills and some lwan chairs and be done with it. End of story. Like Fulton Ferry Park. Have some concerts at night. Why does everything have to cost $200 million?

  • What is this “marine life” of which they speak? Three-eyed fish? Slugs? Come on!

  • Denton,
    Off the top of my head, here are several reasons your “simple” $1 million idea won’t work:
    1) It’s like 85 acres of land – no way you could cover 85 acres with just 1 million
    2) Right now the piers have pier sheds built on them – just demolishing those is probably over $10 million – they are big and probably full of asbestos and lead paint.
    3) Unlike Fulton Ferry park, this park has the BQE running right by it which makes alot of noise – if you don’t do something to block that noise (which the park plan goes to great lengths to deal with) you will not have a pleasant park and people will be calling you an idiot for generations to come
    4)The park is built on piers that are over 50 years old and probably need maintenance like every other pier in the city due to the marine borers. Fulton Ferry is built on terra firma so it doesn’t have that problem. As you can imagine, marine work which requires divers and all that jazz gets pretty expensive pretty quickly. (by the way, this is another reason why parking on these piers in not such a great idea).

    But why should those basic facts get in the way of you assuming that the 3 minutes you have spent thinking about it hasn’t produced a more feasible plan the one that has been worked on for years by scores of people who’ve spent their careers learning how to do something like this?

  • just a stupid plan to begin with. fuck kayacks and all that other water shit. just leave the area alone. we don’t need another battery park city.

  • denton

    6:04, I’ll grant you some of that. Of course I was being a bit facetious, but why does everything have to cost billions of dollars? We’re moving into a time where these grandiose projects will not be able to be funded.

    Do you think the Promenade cost a zillion dollars? No, but it works.

    Nevertheless, the people that have spent their lives thinking about it maybe have forgotten where the money is coming from.

    And about point three, I disagree. The West Side Greenway has plenty of highway noise issues yet it’s pretty packed. If people are buying those Furman Street condos, people are used to it.

    I like noise. If I didn’t I’d move to Iowa.

    I’m inclined to agree with the spirit of 6:38. Just open it up to the public, let us chill on the piers. Lay down a lil’ grass.

    The days of easy money are over for the next decade at least. Time to rethink these things.

  • I vote for an ample municipal parking lot with tennis bubbles and other recreational amenities on top. Sell the central portion to private developers who need to set aside a public waterfront esplanade all the way to Fulton St. Developers can build fancy waterfront homes (2 to 3 stories) with private docks. it would be pretty to look at, you could walk on the new esplanade on nice days, the state would make money, the community would get desperately needed parking as well as tennis courts and other amenities (driving range, fitness center whatever). This would be a MODERN IDEA.
    Let’s stop trying to imitate OLMSTED & VAUX.
    They did their thing 150 years ago, we should do our thing today. PLEASE!!!

  • My poonanner is one malodorous cavity!

    –Montrose Morris

  • “This would be a MODERN IDEA. Let’s stop trying to imitate OLMSTED & VAUX. They did their thing 150 years ago, we should do our thing today. PLEASE!!!”

    Yes, let’s build something that will last (at least 10 years). Let’s cut corners in order to protect our bottom line! Get with the program, people! It’s the 21st century up in here!

  • Hey 8:41, the 19th Centuy is way over. If you are very wealthy, like Martha Stewart, you can reconstruct a replica at great cost of what rich people used to enjoy way back when. Today, most of us just want to enjoy the present, and savor the wonders that our own times offer us.
    Fuck Olmsted! lets have something we can really use. Liberate Brooklyn Bridge Park! Make it something we can drive to and park at and enjoy and then drive home. Fuck the elite and their fantasies of ladies in hoop skirts and men on horseback.

  • Of course, of course…but we were talking about my poonanner.

    –Montrose Morris

  • Of course, of course…but we were talking about my poonanner.

    –Montrose Morris

  • The facts are these:There are only 62 land acres once you take away the existing building. The park planners have inflated the park size to 85 acres, by closing in the water between the piers. Closing in the waters with wave attenuators – which are expensive to build, to maintain, and they are plain silly. They also do harm the environment by changing the composition and activity of the water and thus the marine life. Even if you are not interested in the water wildlife you have to ask yourself why the park planners are putting these things in, in the first place? Why? So they can artificially inflate the “size” of the park in order to justify HOUSING! Not too complicated. They want to build HOUSING on the site and the rules say they can only do so if there is a bigger park foot print. Mmmm. nasty business, this. I say let’s get back to planning a PARK and not fake wetlands and fake tidal pools with wave attenuators! And get rid of those stupid and dangerous highrise luxury towers, too. That is a really really really bad idea for parks.

  • The park is not 85 acres but 62 land acres excluding current buildings – they inflate the size in order to justify housing inside the park. Get rid of these costly and marine-life-harming wave attenuators and get back to creating a park for people not a back-drop for private real estate developers. Get rid of the architects and supporters of this stupid plan who are willing to “experiment” with Brooklyn’s open space by selling off precious waterfront land to the lowest real estate bidder. The park plan that the communities wanted -with things to do on the water including active and passive recreation, all throughout the year.

  • The park is not 85 acres but 62 land acres excluding current buildings – they inflate the size in order to justify housing inside the park. Get rid of these costly and marine-life-harming wave attenuators and get back to creating a park for people not a back-drop for private real estate developers. Get rid of the architects and supporters of this stupid plan who are willing to “experiment” with Brooklyn’s open space by selling off precious waterfront land to the lowest real estate bidder. The park plan that the communities wanted -with things to do on the water including active and passive recreation, all throughout the year.