Verdi’s Sales Like Its Architecture: Ugly

verdi-fort-greene-brooklyn-0108.jpg
The Verdi, a 14-unit development at 80 Adelphi Street in Fort Greene, definitely falls into the “What Were They Thinking?” category. When we scratched our head over this place back in September, two units were allegedly in contract. Now, four months later, there are just three. Is this over-the-top eyesore bound for the rental pool?
The Verdi [Corcoran] GMAP P*Shark DOB
At Verdi, All That Glitters Ain’t Gold [Brownstoner]
New Development: Verdi on Adelphi [Brownstoner]

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  • Wow, that is stunningly hideous.

  • “Beam me up Scotty!

    This planet’s atmosphere contains noxious architecture worse than humanly imaginable.

    Kirk out!”

  • They really needed to recess the balconies into the building envelope to make this work.

  • WTF!!! Staten Island in Ft Greene. No, Dubai.

  • Wow. That design is all sorts of awful. 11:51 beat me to it.

  • I just drove down Adelphi for the first time in a year and pulled over to look at this monstrosity. It’s amazingly bad. May be the ugliest new building in all of Brooklyn, although I’m sure there are other contenders.

  • Way overpriced for such a hideous development on such a borderline block.

  • It’s ugly but intersting or at least memorable. “I live in the Martian building”
    I have said it before, ugly sells. Whether its cars, clothes, or art.

  • slopefarm

    11:54 — I nominate 370 12th Street, the hulking stucco moth, as well as its single-winged sibling a few blocks further south. But this one is up there, too.

  • If this design weren’t so tragic it would be f-in hilarious.

    It’s so South Florida circa early 1990′s. Has this architect even worked since the 80′s & 90′s or is this his comeback and he’s stuck in a timewarp from his heyday? I can’t even imagine what this architect was thinking. If they could at least remove the round things it would be better. And what’s that tacky rickety wood lattice structure attached to the front of the building?

  • My thoughts when I look at this building is…It may be a great design sitting in the wrong place. If this building were sitting somewhere near all the new high tech development taking shape around BAM than maybe it would have a better shot. But on this street it looks like Charlie Brown’s christmas tree.

  • Sweet fancy moses! That thing is ugly..

  • Charlie Brown’s christmas tree?…lol. Now that’s fugh up.

  • “They really needed to recess the balconies into the building envelope to make this work.”

    Had the same thought, minus the “make this work” part. This patient requires more surgery.

  • Wow. See what can be built next to your house when your neighborhood isn’t landmarked?

    Glad I don’t have to walk past this thing to get to the train.

  • I smell a contest brewing — c’mon Bstoner!

  • “It’s ugly but intersting or at least memorable. “I live in the Martian building”
    I have said it before, ugly sells. Whether its cars, clothes, or art. ”

    Are you the unbelievably optomistic person who post whenever an overpriced or unpromising property is featured and tries to make some comment that implies the price might be achievable – e.g. “It just takes one person to love this …” or “Houses in this neighborhood have sold for this much” You are so relentlessly upbeat I think you are either on drugs of a REAL ESTATE AGENT.

  • So Rehab, the only choices in NYC are never be allowed to build anything new, or you get ugly new buildings?

    Nice. Wow, says a lot about how sophisticated NYC is.

    Not.

    Every other city in the world manages to build new buildings, plenty of them, and they don’t turn out like this. NYC is turning into an ugly city because of cheapass developers who don’t want to spend money on a decent architect, that’s all. There are far far far more interesting buildings being built in other cities in the U.S., with more innovation and talent. And international cities, forget it. They’re way ahead.

  • 12:18 – Yes, when I was traveling in France I was struck by how well the old and new buildings were integrated -they have lots of old buildings of course, and how well designed there public buildings, highways,bridges etc are. Must better than the US>.

  • Someone needs to beat the living whimsy out of this architect.

  • No, Guest 12:18, ugly new buildings shouldn’t be the only choice. I love great new modern. I’m just glad that a few of the historic hoods we have are protected from crap like this. And I completely agree with you that the problem is cheap-ass developers, and that other cities are way ahead of us on cool new design.

  • The tragedy here is that the developers actually may have cared somewhat about “design”; otherwise they would not have shelled out $ to achieve such unspeakably blinding, aquatic themed rotund forms. They could have put a fedders buildings that would have been cheaper, but chose not too. This is where bad taste mixed with a desire to capture some sort of a higher end market on myrtle can be a deadly weight on an entire block. That money could have been better spent on a better looking design.
    oh well…

  • There is one benefit to building ugly- no one will complain when you tear it down to build something new. No one will try to landmark your site so in terms of property investment in the long term it makes sence to keep building below expectation.

  • The new buildings in England are worse.

  • Quite possibly the most breathtaking building that mankind has ever constructed.

  • I don’t think it’s so bad. Those keyhole windows are pretty funky. reminds me of wacky Victorian designs. What I hate are concrete boxes that are boring and cheap. This is neither. I think it will grow on you.

  • The worst part about Brooklyn’s cheap-ass developers is they still demand top-of-the-market prices no matter what crap they build.

    It’s something cultural here with these guys that they don’t take pride in their product, they just want the money. You just don’t see buildings this expensive in other cities in the U.S. that are so ugly and cheaply built. In Chicago, Seattle or Minneapolis for the top prices downtown you get a beautifully converted historic loft with very modern elements, designed by an award winning architecture firm. Here you get Joe Shlomo stank junk.

  • Makes Richard Meier look like an amateur.

  • 1:08 I agree. Come to America build crap make money. Only in NY.

  • Don’t be so quick to blame the architect. Alot of times, architects are out ruled by the client on aesthetics. Sometimes clients just don’t want to listen and the architect has to subcome and do what the client wants.

    Granted there are alot of architects who just knock out these cheap, unappealling designs for the money.

  • Uh, slopefarm – you must be referring to “The Juliette.” Beaut, but nowhere close to the fugliness of this. The Camelot, on the other hand (also on 12th st) is a contender.

    BK developers were behind the 12th street fuglies (or maybe it was Bill DB)

  • what’s disturbing is the phallic like vertical window bay.

    I live in the building that looks like two c**ks

  • “Someone needs to beat the living whimsy out of this architect.”
    12:32, you made my day. OK, it IS a slow one, but still… Thanks!

  • My eyes! My eyes! Aiyeeeeee!

    Yes, Brownstoner, how about a Brooklyn’s Ugliest contest?

  • Does anyone know what happened to that building with the sheetrock on the outside and the uneven windows? I don’t know what street it was on ,but Brownstoner had a pic of it a while back. Is it still standing?

  • Wow! I think that architect got cold-cocked! Twice!!

  • This building could look pretty good for Halloween tho:

    http://home.nyc.rr.com/seyr/imgs/verdi-Halloween.jpg

  • Those aren’t penises, they’re the eyestalks of the giant slug or crab that masquerades as a building and feeds on passersby stunned by its bizarre appearance.

    Also, 12:18, a “Not” joke? Come on.

  • Sorry, I couldn’t help the “not” joke before! Because it’s ironic we New Yorkers pride ourselves on being the coolest people in the country. But other cities in the country are kicking our asses with their new architecture.

  • Awesomely awful. What are the cross streets? My mother said never to watch a wreck, but I’ve just got to see this one with my own eyes…

  • I think it would help sales if they filled in those vertical windows with red, like two giant upside down thermometers, everytime someone goes to contract. Feel the fever!

  • I’ll be the contrarian. I don’t think it’s that bad, it has a sort of Louis Kahn, deconstruvist feel. I like the materials choices. At least it’s not one of those fedders box o’ crap structures. Some greenery on the roof and balconies with nice trees in the front would go a long way.

  • Call me crazy, but I kinda actually like it… and I’m not one for most new development. At least it’s bold…

  • I kind of want to go see it in person, too.

    Maybe this will become first widely laughed at, then notorous, then endear itself to the people of Brooklyn in its strangeness.

    I could sort of see the Louis Kahn reference except for the balconies. Question – are all buildings with absurd, useless balconies for which there is no explanation, built by Orthodox Jews? I’d heard that before, because there’s some ceremony they need outdoor space for.

  • i am always confused by posts on these sites…i read them all the time and never subscribe as it mostly seems to be people who like to see themselves look smart or knowledgable. After going through this thread and doing some of my own research. i have this to say. I have lived on this block for 13 years, i am an investor and this is the only unique building, as far as new construction goes, in a long time. If it had grey brick like everyone else would that be better? I just don’t get it. BY the way, went inside, the finishes are very high end. Solid walnut wood floors, (5inch plank too) central AC, high ceilings, etc. These boutique style buildings offer a better quality of finish than you can possibly imagine. So i say go on and hate while the buyers in 3-5 years laugh all the way to the bank…enjoy the hate fest kids..

  • “So i say go on and hate while the buyers in 3-5 years laugh all the way to the bank.”

    Except that there are no buyers. That’s the point.

  • My wife thinks it’s horrible, but I like it. There is symmetry, flow, interesting windows going up. There is a bit of the cathedral to it, don’t you think. Scratch the balconies so the front is smoother and this building would sing. I think that in five years people will really appreciate it.

    I don’t get it, people hate simple fedders shit-boxes but then reject a building that obviously cost real money to build and has personality, you just can’t win for losing.

  • “Don’t be so quick to blame the architect. Alot of times, architects are out ruled by the client on aesthetics. Sometimes clients just don’t want to listen and the architect has to subcome and do what the client wants.”

    OK, then the architect should have walked off the job…in principle.

    As for the Kahn ref’s above…pleeeeze!

    “So i say go on and hate while the buyers in 3-5 years laugh all the way to the bank…enjoy the hate fest kids..”

    You are assuming someone will buy in this WOS (weird as shit) building.

  • Sorry (WAS), even funnier!

  • “You just don’t see buildings this expensive in other cities in the U.S. that are so ugly and cheaply built. In Chicago, Seattle or Minneapolis for the top prices downtown you get a beautifully converted historic loft with very modern elements, designed by an award winning architecture firm….”

    Actually, above poster, while I share your disgust with most of what is being built in Bklyn, I have to argue (as a recent 10-year resident of Chicago) that there is a special brand of heinousness being built in that great town, too. It’s nicer than our Fedders buildings. But it’s really bad, even at high price points. Silly, ugly, bad attempts to create vintage-y townhouse configurations with cinderblock, copper gutters, ugly face brick, Victorianesque pastiches of Italiante/Neo-Grec/Mansard-roofs but with cheap materials, fake slate, fake shingles, garages on the front of the house, pretentiousness run amok– seriously depressing.

    Brooklyn probably deserves the title of capital of bad taste in new construction–if only because nobody in Baltimore can afford to renovate their house anymore–but it’s not alone on that stage.

  • Also: 6:50, please post the phone number of your pot dealer, because he obviously has some great stuff.

  • In fairness to 5:12, I CAN see someone buying these units after they’ve been on the market 3-5 years ;)

  • If they are still standing in 3-5 years, that is.

  • But Rehab, those houses in Chicago you talk about are NOT in this price point and they are not at the top prices in their respective neighborhoods. The comment about comparing what you get elsewhere architecturally, was all about top prices in each city for new developments.

  • Hey, I’ll defend the Louis Kahn reference: check out his work at the U of Penn and for the Parliment in Bangladesh. The brick, the compartmentalized structure and the prominent circular features are all there. This structure may not have the same harmonious feel to it but there appears to be an effort. I would have to see the inside to see if the architect really knew what he/she was doing or was just slapping a bunch of references together in a post-modernist pastiche.

  • I kind of like it too. The context may be all wrong, and architects should take that in to account when they design. It is modern, unique and obviously not Fedders cheap. I tend to also like mid-century and suburban ranch/split level style. Maybe I’m weird but people need to be a little more open minded.

  • this place is also at least 10 min away from any subways. fnu times in the rain.

  • I think it looks great, new and modern. wake up people, get with the time.

  • There are a number of things that could have been done to this structure to make it better looking. rescaleing the “shapes” in relation to its entirety, ditch the balconies, use materials on exterior to complement the neighborhood, build it in Baltimore. Iwas fortunate enough to watch the Guggenheim rise from the earth while I attended Stuyvesant HS and thinking to be an Architect. My opinion? A Frank Lloyd this guy – aint !!!!!!! And by the way NYNY is in a state of flux. Change though sometimes very painful is in the end a GOOD thing. And if you have time go to http://deal.typepad.com VENT!

  • UGLY!!!!!!!!!!!! UGLY!!!!!!!!!!UGLY!!!!!!!!!!
    SINFULLY UGLY!!!!!!!!!!BUT so are alot of other things in this old world….. most of which are are executed by people with NO TASTE who are ONlY concerned about $$$$$$

    If you want to get something off your chest, out of your mind, or you just need to VENT go to http://deal.typepad.com

  • I know I’m late to this party, but as I happen to be one of the three buyers in the building, I think I’m entitled to a word, and the word is, Please. People are confusing design choices with quality in an ill-judged manner.

    Yeah, the iridescent tiles are silly–in fact, many of the aesthetic choices inside and out are head-slappers, but I’ve watched the building go up, and it’s been solidly and carefully built; the materials are high-quality; and the layouts of the apartments are as sensible as any I’ve seen. As for the slow sales, maybe, but I would point out to the original poster that Corcoran actually took all the unsold units off the website for most of the winter and didn’t seem to be pushing the building. It may be that they thought they’d get more interest once the building was completed and they had a sample unit; they’re probably right. I’d note that Clermont Condominiums has made NO sales in its 49-unit, much more conservative building.

    I’m buying into this building because I’ve lived on the block for a decade, and I love it here. So what if there are a few things I don’t like about the building’s aesthetics? I can paint and replace tiles and, in a few years, I’m willing to bet that the condo association will quietly resurface the exterior.